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Med field. 



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342nd 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 
TOWN OFFICERS 



Our thanks and gratitude is extended to Byron and Claire Reed, 
local artists who collaborated on the cover and pen and ink 
drawing of the new gazebo that graces the center of our town 
common. 



342nd Anniversary 




ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1992 



■•: ' , ' ' '^ ■ 




THE 1992 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT IS DEDICATED TO 
PAUL F. CURRAN 



Paul F. Curran has been active in the 
Medfield community since 1966. His caring, 
quiet and unassuming way has touched many 
lives through his involvement as Veterans' 
Director, Veterans' Agent and Burial Agent, 
as a member of the Home Committee, Memorial 
Day Committee, Outreach Advisory Committee 
and as past commander and active member of 
the American Legion Beckwith Post #110. His 
compassion, perseverance and dedication 
exemplifies the spirit of community service. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreports1992medf 



InMemoriam 



WALTER E. ANDERSON 

Developmeent and Industrial Commission 1955-1963 

Treasurer 1960-1969 



EDWIN C. FLAHERTY 
Council on Aging 1974-1981 



WILLIAM L. HALLOWELL 

Personnel Board 1965-1968 

Bicentennial Committee 1974-1977 



JOHN E. NICHOLS 
Park Commissioner 1979-1984 



GILDO J. PEDERZINI 

Finance Committee 1950-1952 

Cemetery Commissioner 1957-1959 



HERBERT D. TALERMAN 

Civil Defense Auxiliary Police Officer 1975-1989 

Special Police Officer 1977-1989 



FACTS ABOUT MEDFIELD 



Population as of January 1, 1992 
Assessed Valuation 1992 



Tax Rate 



7/1/91 
7/1/92 



6/30/92 
6/30/93 



10,747 

$770,364,877.00 

$ 14.16 
$ 14.59 



Area 14.43 Square Miles 

Miles of Highway 7 0.82 

Elevation at Town Hall approximately 180 feet above sea level 
Medfield is in the following Voting Districts: 



9th District 

Representative to Congress 



2nd District 

Governor's Councillor 



1st Suffolk and Norfolk District 
Senator in General Court 



13th Norfolk District 

Representative in General Court 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United State Senators 



John J. Moakley 

World Trade Center, Suite 220 

Boston , MA 02110 



Michael M. Murphy 
8 Flintlocke Lane 
Canton, MA 02021 

Marian Walsh 

Massachusetts Senate 

State House - Room 219 

Boston, MA 02133 

Lida Harkins 

House of Representatives 

State House - Room 257 

Boston, MA 02133 

Edward M. Kennedy 

J.F.K. Memorial Building 

Room 409 

Boston, MA 02203 

John Kerry 

Transportation Building 

10 Park Plaza - Suite 3220 

Boston, MA 02116 



Number of Registered Voters as of December 31, 1992: 

Democrats 1226 

Republicans 1269 

No Party or Designation 4438 

Others 11 



TOTAL 



6944 



1992 ELECTED TOWN OFFICERS 



Ralph C. Copeland 



Nancy J. Preston 



John F. Ganley 
Harold F. Pritoni 
Ann B. Thompson 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MODERATOR 



TOWN CLERK 



SELECTMEN 



Jr. 



Term Expires 
1993 

1994 



1993 
1994 
1995 



ASSESSORS 



Carole A. Rossi 
William D. Walsh 
Clara E. Doub 



1993 
1994 
1995 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



F. Paul Quatromoni 
Clarence A. Purvis 
William F. Tosches 
Richard M. Fitzpatrick 
Mark F. Wilson 



1993 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1995 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Michael D. West 
Maura Y. McNicholas 
Elizabeth J. Kozel 
David B. Allan 
James C. Baughman 



Daniel W. Nye 
Nargaret E. Bancroft 
John K. Gagliani 
Mark G. Cerel 
Paul B. Rhuda 



PLANNING BOARD 



1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 
1995 



1992 
1994 
1995 
1996 
1997 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 



Kathryn Violick-Boole 

Margaret M. Maider 

Eric W. O'Brien, appointed to fill vacancy 

David A. Armstrong, appointed to fill vacancy 

Geralyn N. Warren 

John P. Monahan, resigned 1992 

J. Gary Walsh, resigned 1992 



1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1995 
1995 
1993 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



Valerie A. Mariani, State Appointed 
Mary Ellen Thompson 
Richard D. Jordan 
L. Paul Galante, Jr. 
Diane E. Nightingale 



September 10, 1996 
1993 
1994 
1995 
1996 



APPOINTMENTS 

FIRE CHIEF 
William A. Kingsbury 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Richard D. Hurley 

SERGEANTS 



Ronald E. Kerr 
Raymond T. Wheeler 



John L. Mayer 
John W. Wilhelmi 



POLICE OFFICERS 



Richard D. Bishop 
Robert W. Brady 
Raymond M. Burton 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
Dana P. Friend 
Shawn P. Garvey 



Stephen H. Grover 

Robert G. Hudson 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Robert E. Naughton 

Kevin W. Robinson 



PERMANENT INTERMITTENT POLICE OFFICERS 



John F. Carmichael 
Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Ruth E. Gaffey 



Patrick J. Kenney 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

Shirley M. Rossi 

Daniel J. Sicard 



APPOINTMENTS MADE BY SELECTMEN 

(All appointments expire April 1993 unless otherwise stated. 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Michael J. Sullivan 

TREASURER/ COLLECTOR 

Robert G. Stokes 
October 1, 1990 - September 30, 1993 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Georgia K. Colivas 

TOWN COUNSEL 

Peter M. Michelson 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan A. Willgohs 1993 

Neil D. MacKenzie 1994 

Heidi F. Groff 1995 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

Eric W. O'Brien 1993 

Walter F. Reynolds, Jr. 1994 

David F. McCue 1995 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

Peyton C. March 1993 

Leland D. Beverage 1994 

John J. McKeever 1995 

SUPERINTENDENT OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 

Edward M. Hinkley 

FIELD DRIVER AND FENCE VIEWER 

John P. 0' Toole 



ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 

Raymond M. Burton 
Jennifer Shaw-Verrochi, Assistant 
Nicholas R. Matczak, Assistant 
Joyce R. Bazigian 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi 
Susan Steele, D.V.M. , Assistant 

POUND KEEPER 
Roy Owen 

INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

John P. O'Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Assistant Inspector of Buildings 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 
John A. Rose, Jr., Assistant Gas Inspector 

John A. Rose, Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Assistant Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph F. Erskine, Wiring Inspector 

Tauno 0. Aalto, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

James J. Leonard, Assistant Wiring Inspector 

OFFICIAL GREETER OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Joseph E. Ryan 

OFFICIAL HISTORIAN OF THE TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
Richard P.DeSorgher 

OFFICIAL KEEPER OF THE TOWN CLOCK 

Austin C. Buchanan Edward M. Hinkley, Assistant 

BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Mary I. MairEtienne 1993 

Roberta A. Kolsti 1994 

William H. Dunlea, Jr. 1995 

VETERANS 7 DEPARTMENT 

Paul F. Curran, Director, Agent, Burial Agent 
G. Marshall Chick, Graves Officer 

COLLECTOR OF WATER AND SEWER USE CHARGES 

Robert G. Stokes September 30, 1993 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Patricia A. Rioux 

MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 
Patricia A. Rioux 

PUBLIC WEIGHER 
Patricia A. Rioux 

10 



CONSTABLES AND KEEPERS OF THE LOCK UP 



Richard D. Bishop 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Robert W. Brady 
Patrick J. Caulfield 
John F. Carmichael 
Joseph G. Cavanaugh 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Dana P. Friend 
Ruth A. Gaffey 
John T. Garvey 
Shawn P. Garvey 
Stephen H. Grover 
Robert G. Hudson 
Richard D. Hurley 



Patrick Kenney 

Ronald E. Kerr 

George W. Kingsbury 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr. 

William H. Mann 

John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Robert E. Naughton 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Kevin W. Robinson 

Daniel J. Sicard 

Thomas Tabarani 

Raymond J. Wheeler 

John W. Wilhelmi 



POLICE MATRONS 



Jessie A. Erskine 
Lorna C. Fabbo 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
Mary I. MairEtienne 



Jennifer Shaw Verocchi 



Elisabeth T. Mann 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Mary L. Solar i 



SPECIAL 
Maj. A. F. Abdallah 
Leo Acera 
Jerry W. Adams 
Albert Baima 
Edwin Bettencourt 
Herbert Burr 
William A. Carlson 
John F. Carmichael 
Jonathan M. Carroll 
Vincent M. Cellucci 
Joseph Concannon 
Robert E. Currie 
William J. Davis 
Thomas G. Degnim 
Joseph T. DeStito 
Robert A. Dixon 
Michael J. Doran 
Kenneth Dunbar 
William J. Dwyer 
David C. Egy 
Frank S. Newell 
Warren J. O'Brien 
James P. Pignon 
Janet M. Poirier 
Robert J. Shannon 
Charles H. Stone, Jr. 
Thomas Tabarani 
J. Robert Tocci 
Thomas Walsh 
Paul Sicard 
Donna M. Wo If rum 



POLICE OFFICERS 

Robert V. Eklund, Jr. 

Leo R. Ethier, Jr. 

Glen R. Eykel 

Jeffrey M. Farrell 

Susan A. Fornaciari 

John Gerlach 

John J. Hackett Jr. 

Steven F. Hagan 

Patrick Harris 

Timothy P. Heinz 

John Holmes 

David J. Holt 

Paul J. Murphy 

William D. Jones 

Winslow Karlson III 

Thomas Leen, Jr. 

Joy Leonard 

Roderick A. MacLeod 

David R. McConnel 

Edward J. Meau 

Aaron J. Mick 

Peter Opanasets 

Stephen K. Plympton 

Gary C. Rowley 

Carl Sheridan 

John J. Sullivan 

Domenic J. Tiber i 

William Treeful 

Alan F. Washkewits 

Colin T. Wise 



11 



TRAFFIC SUPERVISORS 



John T. Garvey, Jr. 
Elizabeth R. Hinkley 
George Kingsbury 
Elisabeth T. Mann 
William H. Mann 
Jennifer Shaw Verocchi 



Armando B. Palmieri 

Patricia A. Rioux 

Louise Papadoyiannis 

Mary L. Solari 

Thomas Tabaran 

Armando Viera, Jr. 



AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OFFICER 
Irene L. O'Toole 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



Margaret E. Bancroft 
Bonnie Wren-Burgess 
Sharon Lowenthal 
Stephen M. Nolan 
Peter M. Michelson 



Charles H. Peck 
Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 
Mary Ellen Thompson 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



Ben B. Korbly 
Jean C. Brown 
Robert K. Williams 
John J. Lynch 
Carl J. Brewer 
Madeleine I. Harding, 



Associate Member 



Annie M. Rogers, Associate Member 



April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 
April 1993 
April 1993 



AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT COMPLIANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Jane Archer 
Kenneth Feeney 
Fred Rogers 



Austin Buchanan 

Chief Richard Hurley 

Michael J. Sullivan 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



SUBDIVISION CONTROL 



Burgess P. Standley 

Ralph C. Good, Jr. 

Robert F. Sylvia 

Sandra G. Munsey, Associate Member 

Charles H. Peck, Associate Member 

Kenneth M. Childs, Jr., Associate Member 



April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1993 
April 1993 
April 1993 



ARCHITECTURAL BARRIERS COMMITTEE 



Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 
Bruno J. Palumbo 

Michael J. 



Beverly Hallowell 
Christie A. Shoop 



Sullivan 



12 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



Mary Ann Hatem 
Amy E. Imber 
Jeffrey A. Masters 
Martha M. Moon 
Marie Zack Nolan 
Wendy Clarridge Corkum 
Laura J. Howick 
Rosalie F. Shirley 
Timothy J. Ryan 
Steven H. Cook 
Lucinda Davis 
Francis A. Iafolla 
William F. Pope 



April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 
April 



1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1996 
1996 
1997 
1997 



BLASTING STUDY COMMITTEE 



Joseph D. Codispoti 
Daniel W. Nye 
Robert Sylvia 



William A. Kingsbury 
John P. 0' Toole 



BUSINESS & INDUSTRIAL DISTRICT IMPROVEMENT COMMITTEE 



Fred W. Clarridge 
Thelma M. Meader 



Lorraine G. Holland 
Daniel W. Nye 



CABLE T.V. COMMITTEE 
Clara B. Doub Robert H. Gibbs 

CABLE FRANCHISE NEGOTIATING COMMITTEE 



Thomas Sweeney 
Robert Gibbs 
William Kean 

CADD SYSTEM COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft 

Peter R. Smith 



C . B . Doub 

Robert Sawyer 

Dr. Marion Catlin 



Louise E. Rose 



CAPITAL BUDGET COMMITTEE 



John F. Ganley 
Nancy Temple Horan 
Margaret E. Bancroft 



George Niles 

John A. Moretti 

Michael J. Sullivan 



CEMETERY AGENT 
Lawrence G. Whitestone 



CHARLES RIVER NATURAL STORAGE AREA DESIGNEES 
Michael J. Sullivan Kenneth P. Feeney 



13 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Director 

Thomas Hamano, Underwater Rescue and Recovery 

Patrick S. Harris, Chief Radio Operator 

Judith C. Harris, Radio Operator 

Harold Economos, Radio Operator 

Barry M. Glassman, Radio Operator 

William Johnson, Radio Operator 

Vernon Valero, Radio Operator 

Patricia A. Rioux, Shelter Manager 

CIVIL DEFENSE AUXILIARY POLICE OFFICERS 

Vincent M. Cellucci, Deputy Chief 
Bruce Berry, Sergeant 



Paul B. Alberta 
Raymond M. Burton, Jr 
Harold Economos 
Robert S. Gallagher 
Barry M. Glassman 
Thomas Hamano 
Judith C. Harris 
Patrick S. Harris 
William Johnson 
Craig Jones 
Eric Jones 
Nicholas R. Matczak 



John L. Mayer 

Thomas P. McNiff 

Lorieanne D. Niles 

Thomas Ralph 

Tobey J. E. Reed 

Patricia A. Rioux 

James S. Ryan, Jr. 

Gordon Spencer 

Vernon Valero 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi 

Armando R. Viera, Jr. 



COLLECTIVE BARGAINING TEAM 



Stephen Buckley, Jr. 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr 
Peter M. Michelson 



Richard D. Hurley 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Paul J. Williamson 



COMMUNITY GARDENS COMMITTEE 



Aldo L. D'Angelo 
Leonard C. Haigh 
Harold F. Pritoni 
Edward Touhey 
Arthur McCarthy 



Sr, 



Carol J. Dennison 

Harvey D. Hoover 

Roy Owen 

Louis Riceberg 

Edwin J. Kinter 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Denise Yurkofsky 
Douglas S. Sparrow 
Caroline D. Standley 
Craig S. Harwood 
John Thompson 
Scott D. Pitz 
Ann Lee Howell 
Theresa A. Cos, 
James G. White, 
Betty A. Kaerwer 



Associate Member 
Associate Member 
Associate Member 



April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1994 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 
April 1995 
April 1993 
April 1993 
April 1993 



14 



CONSTABLE FOR ELECTIONS 
Nancy J. Preston 

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 

CREDIT UNION COMMITTEE 



William J. Donovan 
Robert E. Kennedy, Jr. 



Irene L. O' Toole 
James F. Lynn 



DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION 



John F. Ganley 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
Hinkley 
Thompson 



Paul E 
Ann B. 



April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1995 



NATIONAL ORGANIZATION ON DISABILITY 

Frederick A. Rogers, Jr. 

ELECTION OFFICERS 



Priscilla Anderson 
Robert Brady 
Katherine Buchanan 
Francis Colella 
Barbara Connors 
Anna Floser 
Beverly Hallowell 
Elizabeth Lordan 
Mary MairEtienne 
Ann Mentzer 
Anna Murphy 
Edith 0' Toole 
Dorcas Owen 
Nancy Preston 
Patricia Rioux 
Alexander Smith 
Gary Stapin 
Phyllis Wilmarth 



Eldon Bassett 

Joan Bussow 

Sadie Carson 

Georgia Colivas 

Marge Eppich 

Nancy Frank 

Dorothea Gaughran 

Mabelle E. Maguire 

George Mentzer 

Emmy Mitchell 

Margaret O'Brien 

Irene 0' Toole 

Elmer Portman 

Gail Rad 

Kevin Robinson 

Dorothy Sumner 

David Wilmarth 



EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES RESPONSE COMMITTEE 



Raymond M. Burton 
Richard D. Hurley 
Robert E. Meaney, Jr. 



Robert E. Currie 

Joan M. Kiessling 

James D. Sullivan, M.D. 



Michael J. Sullivan 



EMERGENCY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Vincent M. 
Richard D. 
Michael J. 



Cellucci 

Hurley 

Sullivan 



Kenneth P. Feeney 

Robert A. Kinsman 

Ann B. Thompson 



15 



EMPLOYEE INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



George J. Callahan 
Pauline Cooley 
Robert H. White 

Georganne Iverson-Kelley 



Malcolm J.Gibson 

Virginia A. Murley 

Robert J. Santoro 



ENFORCING OFFICER FOR ZONING 
John P. O' Toole Anthony Calo, Assistant 

ENTERPRISE FUND COMMITTEE 



Leland D. Beverage 
John F. Ganley 
John J. McKeever 
Robert G. Stokes 



Kenneth P. 
Peyton C, 
Matthew F. 



Feeney 

March 

Schmid 



Michael J. Sullivan 



FAIR HOUSING OFFICER 
Michael J. Sullivan 



Robert G. Stokes 



FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Reverend Robert L. Wood 



STUDY COMMITTEE TO DEVELOP 4 58 MAIN STREET 



Jane B. Archer 
Francis A. Iafolla 



Margaret Bancroft 
Elizabeth Moore 



MEDFIELD REPRESENTATIVE TO REGIONAL HAZARDOUS WASTE COMMITTEE 

Francis H. Tosches 

HAZMAT COMMITTEE 



Vincent M. Cellucci 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Richard D. Hurley 

William A. Kingsbury 

OFFICIAL TOWN HISTORIAN 
Richard P. DeSorgher 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

David F. Temple 

Burgess P. Standley 

Paul E. Nyren, Jr 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Priscilla Batting 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Richard P. DeSorgher, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 

John Hooper, Associate Member 



Robert A. Kinsman 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Ann B. Thompson 

Joan A. Willgohs 



April 


1993 


April 


1993 


April 


1994 


April 


1994 


April 


1995 


April 


1993 


April 


1993 


April 


1993 


April 


1995 



16 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



Donald MacDonald 
Paul E. Nyren, Jr, 
Richard DeSorgher 
John Hooper 
Stephen M. Nolan 



April 1993 
April 1993 
April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1994 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FINANCING AUTHORITY 



Pauline M. Goucher 
Charles H. Peck 
Ann Lee Howell 
Stephen Buckley, Jr 
Robert J. McCarthy 



April 1993 
April 1994 
April 1995 
April 1996 
April 1997 



INSURANCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



W. Grant Chambers 



Joseph B. McWilliams 



Edward J. MacDonald, resigned 
KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Paul E. Nyren, Jr. 

Thomas S. Lingel, Assoc, mem, 



Barbara Leighton 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Michael Cronin 



LAND MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 



Eric O'Brien 
John A. Moretti 
Harry F. Pritoni, Jr. 



Weston G. Kolsti 

Michael J. Sullivan 

Kenneth P. Feeney 



LOCAL AUCTION PERMIT AGENT 
Irene L. O'Toole 
LOCAL WATER RESOURCE MANAGEMENT OFFICIAL 
Kenneth P. Feeney 
LOCAL ELECTION DISTRICT REVIEW COMMITTEE 



Nancy J. Preston 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Denise Yurkofsky 
Marjorie Temple 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Joseph C. Donnelly 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 
Charles H. DeBevoise 
Martha L. Smick 
Jeffrey Masters 



Robert G. Stokes 



April, 
April, 
April, 
April, 
April , 
April, 
April, 
April , 



1993 
1993 
1993 
1994 
1994 
1994 
1995 
1995 



17 



MEDFIELD DESIGNEE - MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 
Michael J. Sullivan 

MEDFIELD STATE HOSPITAL REUSE COMMITTEE 

Joseph Donnelly Joseph Schembri, Ed. D. 

Paul Rhuda Paul Bardelli 

Marion Caitlin Richard Guilmette 

Timothy Hall Laura Catlin 

Mark Cerel Ann B. Thompson, Ex Officio 

Michael J. Sullivan, Ex Officio 

METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 

Martha L. Smick August, 1993 

MEMORIAL DAY COMMITTEE 

Paul F. Curran Albert J. Manganello, Jr. 

Clifford G. Doucette Donald Mailing 

John F. Ganley Frank C. Mayer 

Richard D. Hurley, Chief Irene L. O'Toole 

William A. Kingsbury, Chief Dorcas B. Owen 

Gerald P. Kazan jian James F. Tubridy 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 

Paul F. Curran Richard F. DeSorgher 

Robert A. Kinsman David F. Temple 

Patricia A. Walsh 

MILLIS CONSORTIUM FOR RECYCLING 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

MINORITY BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICER 

Irene L. O'Toole 

MUNICIPAL CENSUS SUPERVISOR 

Nancy J. Preston 

NEPONSET WATER SUPPLY PROTECTION STUDY COMMITTEE 

Leland D. Beverage 

REPRESENTATIVE TO THE NORFOLK COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 

John F. Ganley 

OPEN SPACE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Margaret E. Bancroft Eric W. O'Brien 

Kenneth P. Feeney Martha L. Smick 

Barbara Cushman-Lodge Michael J. Sullivan 

Jonathan Bennett Caroline D. Standley 

Charles F. Ferullo, Jr. Christine M. Hajjar 

James W. Sullivan Jane Ann Hayes 

18 



PARKING CLERK AND HEARING OFFICER 
Nancy J. Preston Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Asst 



PESTICIDE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Edward M. Hinkley 
Graeme Justice 



William M. Jackson 
Robert A. Kinsman 



Alan D. Paul 



PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
William A. Kingsbury, Chief 
Thomas Reis 
Ann B. Thompson 
Thompson Lingel 



Michael J. Sullivan 

Robert G. Stokes 

John A Rose, Jr. 

Walter Reynolds, Jr. 



PUBLIC WORKS PROJECTS COMMITTEE 



Kenneth M. Childs, Jr 



Michael J. Sullivan 
RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Barbara Donnelly 

Kenneth P. Feeney 

Erin Pastuszenski 

Sandra Frigon 

David F. Temple, Resigned 



Kenneth P. Feeny 



Cheryl E. Dunlea 

Cynthia Greene 

Daniel O'Toole 

John C. Moon 



JOINT REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE 

Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 

REGIONALIZATION GROUP 
Frances Cusack 



RIGHT-TO-KNOW COORDINATOR 

William A. Kingsbury 

SAFETY COMMITTEE 



Jane B. Archer 
Kenneth P. Feeney 



Ann J. Grady 
Jane Kimbal 
Philip P. Bonanno 
Paul J. Alfano 



John A. Moretti 
SIGN ADVISORY 



Marguerite M. Eppich 
Irene L. O'Toole 



April, 1993 

April, 1993 

April, 1993 

April, 1995 



STRATEGIC PLANNING COMMITTEE 



R. Edward Beard 
Robert Sawyer 
Donald Harding 



Lida Harkins 

Randie Martin 

Richard DeSorgher 



19 



THREE RIVERS INTERLOCAL COUNCIL (MAPC) 
Martha Smick Michael J. Sullivan 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEDFIELD CENTER TRAFFIC 



Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
Kenneth M. Chi Ids, Jr. 
Richard Hangen 



Mark G. Cerel 
David Temple 



YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



Marc R. Mercadante 
Daniel V. Arnold 
Shiela M. McCabe 
Tracie L. Slack 
Ellen L. Gray 
Brendan D. McNulty 
Peter C. (Chip) Cornwell 
Gregory B. Thomson 
Shannon T. Cook 
Robert M. Senger 
Lauren M. Young 
Lisa A. Halliday 
Eric B. Palson 
Daniel J. Rosen 
Brian A. Miller 
Gay W. D'Amaro 
Elizabeth Marcel 
Regina O'Connor 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 
Christine E. Nolan 
Gregory P. Fournier 
Allison M. Foley 
Thomas R. Guilmette 
Melissa P. Kelcourse 
Mara A. Strier 
Mary Gillis 
Heather Wood 



Alisa N. Kendrick 

Jillian D. Mariani 

Jennifer M. Lodgsdon 

Paul L. Galante III 

Sara E. Mastronardi 

Courtney E. Cannon 

Alexis Kosc 

Kevin P. Barry 

Elizabeth L. McKeever 

Neal E. Toomey 

Jack Finley 

Gary K. Moss 

Sarah Pronovost 

Erica L. Hunt 

Wayne C. Currie, Jr. 

William "Jack" Heller 

Thomas P. McNiff 

David G. Taylor 

Robert W. Wallace 

Adam N. Gottlieb 

Jennufer A. Karnakis 

Nicholas J. Scobbo III 

David R. Thomas 

Lisa C. Petras 

Catherine Moroney 

Elizabeth Newton 



APPOINTED BY ASSESSORS 

Stanley E. Bergeron, Assistant Assessor 
Irene M. Hartling, Assistant Assessor 
Marjorie M. Temple, Assistant Assessor 



APPOINTED BY TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
June Doucette, Assistant 

APPOINTED BY TOWN CLERK 

Dorcas B. Owen, Assistant 
Frederick A. Rogers, Jr., Assistant Hearing Officer 



20 



APPOINTED BY CHAIRMAN OF THE SELECTMEN 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND THE MODERATOR 

VOCATIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE REPRESENTATIVE 

Karl D. Lord June 30, 1995 



APPOINTED BY FIRE CHIEF 

Charles G. Seavey, Deputy Fire Chief 

Thomas Seeley, Captain 

Clinton M. Clark, Lieutenant 

Thomas M. LaPlante, Jr., Lieutenant 

Richard M. Rogers, Lieutenant 

David C. O' Toole, Lieutenant 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

William R. Domey, P.E., Engineer/Agent April 1993 

John J. Keefe, R.S., Milk Inspector/Agent April 1993 
Mae L. Otting, Administrative Assistant April 1993 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 

DEPUTY MODERATOR 
Tidal B. Henry 

WARRANT COMMITTEE 

Stephen Buckley, Jr. April 1995 

Mary W. Harney April 1993 

Sally I. Wright April 1995 

Thompson S. Lingel April 1993 

George P. Niles, Jr. April 1994 

Neal R. Olsen April 1994 

Martin Rosen April 1994 

Matthew F. Schmid April 1993 

Pat Whitney April 1993 

PERMANENT SCHOOL BUILDING AND PLANNING COMMITTEE 

Mark H. Kaizerman April 1994 

F. Paul Quatromoni April 1995 

David R. Iverson April 1995 

Harry C. Merrow April 1993 

Elmer O. Portmann April 1993 
Thomas M. Reis, Ex Officio 

COMMITTEE TO STUDY FEASIBILITY OF REGIONALIZATION 

Justin L. Brady Elmer O. Portmann 

Richard P. DeSorgher J. Gary Walsh 
Werner F. Kiessling 



21 



APPOINTED BY THE COMMITTEE CONSISTING OF THE MODERATOR, 
THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN AND CHAIRMAN 
OF THE WARRANT COMMITTEE 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

James F. Lynn November 30, 1995 

Marcel Joseph November 30, 1994 

Michael Walsh November 30, 1993 

Thomas N. Fannin, resigned November 30, 1993 

APPOINTED BY THE PLANNING BOARD 



ASSOCIATE PLANNING BOARD MEMBER FOR SITE PLAN REVIEWS 
Joseph R, Parker, Jr. April, 1993 



LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 
formerly, THE MASTER PLAN IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE 

Martha L. Smick 
Joseph C. Donnelly, Jr. 
Daniel L. Jones, Jr. 
Jeffrey Masters 
Denise Yurkofsky 
Marjorie M. Temple 
Geralyn M. Warren 
Charles H. DeBevoise 



SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 



Apr i 1 , 


1995 


April, 


1994 


April, 


1994 


April, 


1995 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1994 


April, 


1995 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1993 


April, 


1994 



Paul J. Alfano 
Ann J. Grady 
Jane Kimball 
Philip P. Bonanno 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER /COLLECTOR 

Marguerite M. Eppich, Assistant Treasurer - September 30, 1993 
Nancy Griffin, Assistant Collector - September 30, 1993 



22 



BOARD, COMMITTEE AND COMMISSION MEETINGS 



NAME 

Annual 

Town Election 

Annual 

Town Meeting 

Appeals Board 



Arts Council 
Assessors 
Civil Defense 

Conservation 
Health 

Historical Comm. 

Housing 
Authority 



DAY 

Last Monday 
in March 

Last Monday 
in April 

Wednesdays 
as needed 

Bi-annually 

1st Thursday/Month 

1st Monday/Month 

1st Thursday/Month 

1st and 3rd 
Wednesday /Month 

3rd Wednesday/Mo. 

3rd Monday /Month 



TIME 



6 A.M. to 
8 P.M. 



PLACE 

Memorial 
School 



Library Trustees 2nd Tuesday/Month 



Park and 
Recreation 

Planning 

Recycling 

School Comm. 

Selectmen 
Warrant Comm. 
Water & Sewer 



2nd and 4th 
Tuesday/Month 

Monday 

Tuesday 



7:30 P.M. High School 



7:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 
6:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

7:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 

8:00 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 
7:30 P.M. 



Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Police 
Station 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

Tilden 
Village 

Library 

Pfaff Ctre. 

Town Hall 
Town Hall 
Dale St. 



1st & 3rd Monday 

September- June 

(once a month July-August) 

Tuesday 7:00 P.M. Town Hall 

(every other Tuesday and as needed) 

Tuesday - Fall to 8:30 P.M. Town Hall 
Town meeting 

1st & 3rd Tuesday 7:30 P.M. Town Hall 



23 



24 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1992 



25 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To The Residents of Medfield: 

The Board reorganized for the ensuing year in March and 
elected John F. Ganley, Chairman, Harry F. Pritoni, Jr. , Clerk 
and congratulated Ann B. Thompson on her re-election to a third 
term as Selectmen. 

The year 1992 could be described as a year of renovation, 
construction, regionalization, and beautif ication. It was also 
a year of change in our local, state, and federal government 
and the world. 

RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION: 

In April, upon the recommendation of the School Planning and 
Building Committee, the Selectmen engaged A. Anthony Tappe and 
Associates to do a study for renovations and an addition to 
our thirty one year old Medfield High School. At the April 
town meeting voters filled the high school gymnasium and 
auditorium to debate the issue and voted 866 to 148 to 
appropriate 6.9 million dollars to design, construct, furnish 
and equip an addition and renovate the Medfield High School 
building, subject to passage of a debt exclusion override in a 
special election to be held in June. This override passed by a 
wide margin. In September, the bid was awarded to the same 
firm that did the study. The School Building and Planning 
Committee, headed by Elmer Portmann, is working towards a 
starting date of June 1993 and a completion date of Fall of 
1994. 

After five years of planning, the Allendale Affordable Housing 
Project has become a reality. A lottery was held in April and 
seventeen families were chosen in an emotional and happy 
lottery. Construction began in August and by the end of the 
year most of the seventeen families were settled in their new 
homes. We would like to extend our thanks and appreciation to 
the Affordable Housing Committee and to the Medfield 
Development Corporation who spent countless hours on this 
project and came through on schedule with an affordable housing 
complex that the town can be proud of. 

REGIONALIZATION: 

After last year's town meeting, a Committee to Study the 
Feasibility of School Regionaliaation was formed and charged 
with the task of reporting back to the Selectmen this year. 
The Committee voted four to one that it was not a reasonable 
idea to pursue regionalization. A minority report was given 
by Werner Keissling. 

The Selectmen voted to support and sign an application for a 
Municipal Incentive Grant to be submitted by the Town of Millis 
on behalf of Millis, Medfield and Norfolk for the purpose of 
studying the feasibility of regionalizing the towns' police and 
ambulance departments. 



26 



A Study Committee to Study the Financial Impact to the Town by 
joining with the Millis Consortium, an effort to regionalize a 
recycling facility, was headed by Selectman Harold F. Pritoni, 
Jr. Detailed information was presented and the conclusion was 
that Medfield was better off to continue to recycle 
independently rather than join the Consortium. Medfield' s 
recycling efforts exceed state mandates now and are doing well 
on our own. We would like to commend Superintendent of Public 
Works Feeney and the Recycling Committee for establishing a 
workable recycling program and for their continued efforts to 
educate the public and encourage recycling. 

As state funds decrease and mandates increase, department heads 
and town committees and commissions have all worked together to 
provide services in a cost effective way, and we must continue 
to explore viable alternatives, such as regionalization. 

BEAUTIFICATION: 

In 1985 a Committee was formed to study the best use for the 
former site of St. Edward's Church which was purchased by the 
town, and it was decided to pursue the idea of a town common. 
This year, the completion of this beautiful town common was 
highlighted by the addition of a distinctive gazebo in the 
center of the grounds, and a perennial garden planted by the 
Garden Club adjacent to it. The Board voted to dedicate the 
gazebo to the citizens of Medfield past and present. This 
common was constructed with minimal town funds and with 
generous contributions by the townspeople and business alike. 

Because of fiscal contraints, the town has had to come up with 
creative ways to fund special projects such as this. The 
proceeds from the returnable bottle bin at the Transfer Station 
has been used to fund the Town Common, Grist Mill and Hazardous 
Waste Collection Day. We hope you keep this in mind when you 
are recycling. 

CHANGES : 

This year saw changes in elected offices locally, state-wide 
and nationally. Locally, the first ever recall petition was 
initiated to recall School Committee members. Incumbants were 
replaced by two new members. At the state level, town 
resident, Senator Christopher Lane was replaced by Marion 
Walsh. On the federal level, our district bounds were redrawn 
and we became part of the 9th Congressional District serviced 
by Congressman John Joseph Moakley. Nationally, the country 
voted for William Clinton for President and Albert Gore for 
Vice President. 

The declining economy was a prime factor in many of these 
changes. Towns, cities, states, and the nation struggle to 
balance budgets and deal with inflation and a rising deficit. 
If we don't face reality now and deal with deficit spending, 
future generations will have to pay the consequences. If towns 
such as Medfield can set an example by honest and responsible 
government, by educating our children and preserving our 
environment, and letting it be known that we expect the same 
from our state and federal government, then perhaps the message 
will be heard. 

27 



RETIREMENTS : 

After twenty six years as Town Counsel, Charles Fuller, Jr. 
retired in June. Serving as Town Counsel was almost an 
avocation for Chuck, as he loved the town and what he was 
doing. He had a knowledge of municipal law that was 
unsurpassed and he will be missed. The Board appointed 
resident Peter Michelson, of the firm of Bromberg and Sunstein 
as his replacement. 

Edward J. MacDonald retired from the Insurance Advisory 
Committee after eighteen years of service. His expertise and 
in the field of insurance and his dedication was an invaluable 
asset to the town and he saved the town literally hundreds of 
thousands of dollars. He exemplifies the type of volunteer 
that the town has been fortunate to have over the year. 

Special recognition was also given to Joan M. Kiessling upon 
her retirement in October after thirteen years of service as 
Emergency Medical Technician and to William F. Kean upon his 
resignation from the Cable Television Committee. 

NEW TOWN COMMITTEES: 

A Strategic Planning Committee was appointed in January to 
provide a long term look at all the town services and 
facilities, review current and potential revenue sources and 
look at regionalization and consolidation of town services and 
the impact of state and federal mandates. 

A Traffic Study Committee was appointed to study the traffic 

conditions, parking, and lights in the center of town. We 

realize that as the town grows, we need to look ahead to 

alleviate problems that have arisen and provide for a 

pleasant, workable downtown area. Funds will have to be 

allocated for a professional traffic study and we hope to 
obtain these at our next annual town meeting. 

Medfield State Hospital Reuse Committee was appointed in 
September to study suggestions and plans for possible reuse of 
Medfield State Hospital in the event the Commonwealth 
discontinues its current use as a state mental facility. 

DONATIONS OF LAND: 

The Town has been fortunate in the past to have land owners 
donate land to the Town for conservation and preservation 
purposes, and this year is no exception. The Board accepted a 
piece of land on Lakewood Terrace that once was the site of a 
millstone quarry operation, a gift from John D. Copeland and 
Linda M. Baldini. 

The Board also voted to accept a parcel of land from the G. 
Kennedy Realty trust on Millbrook Road for conservation 
purposes . 



28 



SNOW EMERGENCY: 

The year ended with a huge snow storm on December 12 and 13th 
and as a result, the Board voted to declare a snow emergency. 
This storm dumped 24 inches of wet snow on Medfield and caused 
damage to trees and brush that was equal to, if not more than 
we have experienced in past hurricanes. Some homes were without 
electricity for as long as four days. As usual, all town 
departments did a tremendous job, working around the clock so 
that Medfield would get back to normal as soon as possible. We 
are very proud of the people that we have working with us. 

CONCLUSION: 

The Board members continue to be involved in the Norfolk 'County 
Advisory Board, Walpole sludge issue, Medfield State Hospital, 
Youth Advisory and various other special committees and 
commissions in addition to their regular Selectmen's meetings. 
We urge our citizens to participate in town government. Our 
unique form of New England town government is new to many of 
our recent residents, and participation by old as well as new 
citizens is a worthwhile experience and can really make a 
difference. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John F. Ganley, Chairman 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Clerk 
Ann B. Thompson 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 








Selectman Ganley honoring Edward J. MacDonald upon 
his retirement from the Insurance Advisory Committee. 



29 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my 11th Annual Report for the Public 
Works Department. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

Resurfacing: The following streets were crack filled, Grader 
patched and slurry sealed: Surrey Run, The Paddock Lane, 
Marlyn Road, Blacksmith Drive, Hutson Road, Kamark Road, 
Longmeadow Road, Evergreen Road, Springvalley Road, Woodfall 
Road and Stonybrook Road. 

Marlyn Road: The final cleanup and inspection of the Marlyn 
Road drainage project was completed in the Spring of 1992. 

The Medfield Highway Department performed routine maintenance 
of 75 miles of roadway with 72.63 tons of asphalt. 

Sub-Division Inspections: The following subdivisions were 
inspected for proper installation of streets, water, sewer 
and drainage: Rocky Acres, Woodcliff Estates Phase 1 and 2, 
Grist Mill Pond Estates, Homestead Estates, Tallwoods, Kettle 
Pond Estates, Hawthorne Village, and the Meadows. 

High School Soccer Fields: .Final grading of the soccer 
fields was completed in 1992. Seeding will be completed in 
1993. 

Sidewalks: The Highway Department reconstructed 3 00 feet of 
cement sidewalk on North Street. 

Philip Street Reconstruction: The gravel part of Philip 
Street was regraded, shoulder work completed and hot topped 
for a distance of 520 feet. 

Noon Hill Culvert: This hazard elimination project was 
approved by local Conservation in late October and 
construction started in November. In December the Department 
of Environmental Protection took over the job because of 
State Permit requirements. At this time we have resubmitted 
applications to fulfill all State requirements. Hopefully, 
the project will be completed in the Spring of 1993. 

Main Street Drainage: The Highway Department installed 4 00 
feet of drainage and seven catch basins along Main Street. 

Transfer Station: The Medfield Highway Department built new 
recycling and materials overflow areas. These new areas 
should help to simplify recycling and aid in traffic flows at 
the Transfer Station. We also added #2 Plastics to our 
recycling list. 



30 



Recycled: 


Glass 


110.45 tons 




Cans 


19.33 tons 




Newsprint 


618.78 tons 




#2 Plastics 


7.97 tons 




White Goods Metal 


252 tons 




Grass and Leaves 


1500 cubic yards 




Deposit Cans and Bottles 


$1,994.45 



5,391.67 tons of solid waste were trucked to the Wheelabrator 
incinerator in Millbury. 

Snow: The total snow fall for 1992 was 37 1/4 inches. The 
normal snowfall for Medfield should average 60 inches. 

Blizzard: On Saturday, December 12, the snow began and 
continued into Sunday the 13th. The major problem with this 
storm was that the 24 inches of wet snow brought down trees 
and wires which hampered snow removal operations. It also 
caused widespread power outages. With the combined efforts 
of the Street, Water and Sewer Departments, we were able to 
keep the streets of Medfield open to vehicle traffic for the 
entire duration of the storm. The cleanup of trees and limbs 
lasted an additional five weeks and generated 20,000 cubic 
yards of brush. To put the scope of damages into 
perspective, the amount of debris generated by this one storm 
exceeded the amount of debris generated by Hurricane Gloria 
and Hurricane Bob. Total cost of damages and cleanup 
expenses were $282,052. The Town of Medfield was declared a 
disaster area and became eligible for Federal and State aid. 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

The total amount of water pumped in 1992 was 
366,322,000 gallons, or 34,559 gallons per capita. 

The Water Department replaced, installed or inspected 
the following: 

64 new services 

5 new hydrants (replaced) 
54 meters (replaced) 
59 new meters 
5,000' new water main (Main Street) 
1,000' new water main (Orchard Street) 
3 00' new water main (Causeway Street) 

During the Blizzard of 1992 the #1 water truck 
overheated while plowing snow and caught fire. The truck was 
a total loss. 

Unfunded federal mandated water testing will cost the 
Town of Medfield approximately $10,000 per year. 

SEWER DEPARTMENT 

In 1992 we tested 300,589,000 gallons of waste water of 
which 29,009,230 gallons came from the State Hospital. We 
also received 597,950 gallons of septage. 



31 



In 1992, we trucked 8,297,000 gallons of 4% sludge 
New England Treatment Company in Rhode Island. 



to 



The new Federal Discharge Permit has been issued to the 
Medfield Wastewater Treatment Plant and will be in effect for 
the next five (5) years. 

The Environmental Protection Agency team found the 
Treatment Plant in full compliance with its current discharge 
permit and issued the Town of Medfield a new permit. 

State Grant Program; Phase II of the Infiltration Inflow 
Study and Smoke testing was completed in 1992. This program 
is a combination of a federal and state grant. 

In conclusion, appreciation is expressed to secretaries 
Edith Fernald of the Highway Department and to Evelyn Clarke 
of the Water and Sewer Department, Robert Kennedy, Street 
Department Foreman, Charles Evans, Water and Sewer Foreman, 
and Peter lafolla, Chief Operator of the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant, as well as, all the men of the various departments who 
are to be commended for their continuous conscientious 
public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth P. Feeney, 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 




Public Works Superintendent Feeney 
for Allendale. 



with contractor 



32 



,■■:;:,. 




Brush pile at transfer station from December blizzard 








Resurfacing Philip Street 



■?-■ 




in Street drainage construction project 
33 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Chief of the Fire 
Department for the year ending December 31, 1992. 

This year brought about many changes in personnel. We 
had two members retire, Lt. Clinton Clark who served for 4 
years and Firefighter James Tubridy who served for 2 7 years. 
Their years of dedicated service to the town is greatly 
appreciated, and I wish them well in their retirement. We 
had four members, David Bento, Joseph Cavanaugh, Dwayne 
Doherty and Benjamin Martin, resign due to either conflicting 
schedules which made them unavailable or a move from the 
community. I thank them for the time and effort they gave to 
the department. In July, Jeffrey Bennotti, James Gorman, 
Jr., and John Monahan were appointed to the department. 

Our ongoing training this year was highlighted by the 
conducting of a "live burn" which took place at a building 
scheduled to be demolished, Members of the department, along 
with members from Millis and Norfolk, were trained in all 
aspects of interior fire attack and ventilation procedures. 
This was an excellent "hands on" experience for everyone 
involved. This year we were also host to a Pumps and 
Hydraulics class conducted by Massachusetts Fire Academy, 
which was attended by firefighters from Norfolk County. 

In July, we accepted delivery of our new engine, a 1992 
Pierce 1250 GPM Pumper. This piece replaced a 1961 
International and is designated as Engine 2 . Members of the 
department are extremely proud of this unit and it should 
serve the community well for years to come. In August we 
accepted delivery of our Air/Fill Purification System. This 
system enables us to fill our air tanks at the station which 
minimizes down time and greatly enhances our training 
program. 

In December the town was hit by a devastating winter 
storm. Eight department members and I in a 3 6 hour period 
answered over 150 calls for assistance for downed wires, 
investigations, water problems, medical emergencies and a 
vehicle fire. The firefighters performed above and beyond 
the call of duty under such adverse conditions. Their 
commitment to the citizens of Medfield was evident when 
members put their own businesses aside or used personal days 
from their jobs, to stay on duty the week following the 
storm, to make sure all emergencies had been addressed and 
the damage to the fire alarm system had been repaired. 

Inspections and Fire Drills were conducted at the 
Nursing Home, Preschools, Schools and other buildings both 
public and private, throughout the year. 



34 



As always, I am extremely grateful for the dedication 
and service that the members of the department continue to 
show throughout the year. Without them we would be lost. I 
would also like to thank our volunteer dispatcher Fred 
Rogers, Town Officials, and Town Hall personnel for their 
help and cooperation throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Kingsbury, 
FIRE CHIEF 




Medfield Call Fireman at "live burn training session 

at former Fire Chief Clarks' camp. 

(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press) 



35 



SERVICES RENDERED FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1992 



ALARMS 



Accidental 


63 


Box 


165 


False 


2 


Still 


157 


Home 


31 


December 13, Storm 


154 


SERVICES 




Assist Ambulance 


3 


Appliances 


12 


Bomb Scares 


2 


Brush and Grass 


15 


Burners -Oil 


4 


- Gas 





Chimneys 


1 


Details 


8 


Dumpsters 


1 


Electrical 


14 


Fuel Spills 


6 


Gas Grilles 


1 


Investigations 


83 


Motor Vehicles 


10 


Motor Vehicles Accidents 


15 


Mutual Aid - Rendered 


9 


- Received 


3 


Rescues 


2 


Reports to Fire Marshal 


8 


Station Duty 


2 


Responses to Medfield State 


Hospital 44 


Structures 


8 


PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 




Lock Outs 


1 


Water Problems 


7 


Assist Police Department 


1 


Other 


3 


INSPECTIONS 




Blasting 


129 


Fire Prevention 


46 


Fuel Storage 


64 


New Residential 


65 


New Commercial 


3 


Smoke Detectors - New 


65 


- Resale 


221 


Oil Burners 


64 


Tank Truck 


1 


Woodstoves 


6 



36 



PERMITS ISSUED 




Blasting 


23 


Bonfire 


1 


Burning 


681 


Fuel Storage 


59 


Fire Alarm Inst/Alt 


3 


Propane Storage 


8 


Powder Storage 


8 


Sprinkler System Inst/Alt 


8 


Tank Truck 


1 


U/Tank Removal 


19 


U/Tank Installation 


1 




New 1992 Pierce Pumper placed into service 
July 1, 1992. 



37 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Board of Selectmen and residents who have assisted the 
Department throughout the year. The last twelve months have 
provided an opportunity to weigh some alternative methods, 
such as multi-community policing. A state grant has opened 
the doors to changing police work in the Northeast. 

Budget cuts have caused drastic attempts to balance 
public safety with a balanced budget. If a Tri-Town Police 
Department does not materialize, serious cuts in personnel 
will have to be made. Public safety is usually appreciated 
only after an urgent need for help is realized. One should 
not ask after the fact, why did we go without it. Nineteen 
hundred and ninety-three will be a crucial year. 

The year gave us some reductions in crime, but the 
abuse petitions skyrocketed. With more than three hundred 
restraining orders in effect, it has tapped our small 
community. Abuse has topped our nations most feared list. 
Protection laws have made the Police Officer's job extremely 
complex. It has also kept Officers tied up for hours 
obtaining restraining orders and securing the family in safe 
homes . 

This year all Officers turned in the old six shooter 
for a .40 caliber semi-automatic handgun. Each officer was 
trained in day and night stress qualifications. The extra 
training was the first of its kind in the State. Two-thirds 
of the Police Department work nights and yet formally we 
trained on bright sunny days without stress or poor weather 
conditions. Training should be a realistic event to be 
rewarding. 

My personal thanks to Sgt. John Wilhelmi and Officer 
Stephen Grover for their dedication to making sure that each 
officer was qualified with his new weapon. 

Officers John Carmichael, Ray Burton and Stephen Grover 
completed an eighty hour course in advanced traffic accident 
investigation . 

Detective Robert E. Naughton won the prestigious George 
Hannah Medal of Honor. Bob is the proud holder of the New 
England Chief's of Police Medal of Honor, the Massachusetts 
Patrolmen Association Medal of Honor, The American Legion's 
Law and Order Award, the Medfield Police Department's Medal 
of Valor and the Town of Medfield' s Selectmen Citation of 
Bravery Award. Thanks Bob for a job well done. 



38 



The Police Station alterations are now complete and I 
would like to thank the citizens of Medfield for their 
patience. The process was slow but done right. The North 
Street entrance has added security and has enhanced the 
beauty of the station. Let's work together to make this year 
as good as last. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley, Chief 
MEDFIELD POLICE DEPARTMENT 




Detective Robert Naughton Naughton at State House 
accept George Hanna Award for Bravery. 
(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press) 



to 



39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Statistics for 1992 are as follows: 

Accidents 183 

Arrests 75 

Assists 522 

Bomb Scares 2 

Burglar Alarms 521 

Civil and Family problems 87 

Disturbance calls 12 3 

Closed Homes 3 

Doors and Windows 54 

Breaking and Entering 2 2 

Emergency calls 256 

Fires 53 

Fire Alarms 13 3 

Funeral Traffic 18 

Larceny 80 

Lost children 4 

Found children 4 

Malicious Damage 15 

Mischief 45 

Missing Patients Medfield State Hospital 52 
Missing Patients Medfield State Hospital Picked Up 3 

Messages Delivered 28 

Missing persons 24 

Missing persons located 33 

Sudden Deaths 11 

Suspicious Cars 77 

Suspicious Persons 34 

Suspicious Phone calls 60 

Assaults 9 

Stolen Property Recovered 1 

Stolen Cars 2 

Stolen Cars recovered 6 

Accosting 3 

Miscellaneous Complaints 318 

Ambulance trips 4 01 

Fatal 1 

Animal Control Calls 237 

Deer killed by cars 3 6 

Hazard Calls 185 

Protective Custody 4 

Drugs 2 

Assault and Battery with a Deadly Weapon 1 

Fireworks 18 

Hunters 531 

Storm 2 

209A Violations 2 

Solicitors Complaints 24 

Miscellaneous By Laws 6 

Murder 1 

Operating Under the Influence 2 



40 



AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Emergency Medical Technicians of the Medfield 
Ambulance responded to 401 calls in 1992. This was an 
increase over 1991, 387 calls. We would like to thank the 
people for their support throughout the year. 

For another year of dedication and excellence given by 
our voluntary EMTS and the paramedics from Norwood and 
Leonard Morse Hospitals, thank you. 

After twelve years of service, we sadly say good-bye to 
Joan Kiessling. She will be missed. Brendan McNiff joined 
our ranks of volunteers. 

Destination of trips as follows: 

Leonard Morse Hospital 236 

Norwood Hospital 83 

Glover 22 

Framingham Union 5 

Newton Wellesley 5 

Brigham & Womens 2 

VA Hospital 1 

Dedham Medical 1 

Faulkner 1 

Milford 1 

Southwood 1 

Deaconess 1 

Life Flight 1 

Home 2 

Mutual Aid 13 

Cancelled 25 



Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Hurley 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



41 



AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1992 saw it finally happen. .. "Allendale, " an affordable 
housing subdivision of 17 single family homes, became a 
reality on Dale Street! After more than five years of 
planning and work, including the challenging task of 
conquering the State's "alphabet soup" of agencies, 
Allendale was approved under the Local Initiative Program and 
received a comprensive permit from the Board of Appeals. An 
emotional lottery was held in April 1992 in which 42 
qualified first time, moderate income buyers participated. 

The Medfield Community Development Corporation (MCDC) , 
a non-profit corporation formed by Affordable Housing 
Committee members and other citizens who wanted to see 
affordable housing built in Medfield, served as the developer 
of Allendale. 

In June, State Senator Chris Lane filed a bill on 
Medfield' s behalf with the state legislature that made the 
transfer of land from the Town to the Medfield Community 
Development Corporation exempt from the state's new Uniform 
Procurement Act. Town Meeting had passed an article in 1988 
which enabled the town to sell the land to the Medfield 
Community Development Corporation for $1. However, since the 
transaction had not officially taken place, Senator Lane's 
bill enabled the project to proceed as planned. 

During the summer, final engineering and design for the 
site work and housing was completed. 

The Executive Office of Communities and Development 
(EOCD) issued an environmental clearance and release of Small 

Cities Program grant funds for the infrastructure, a Housing 

Development Support Program grant of $537,440 on August 7th. 

On August 12th the Medfield Community Development Corporation 
(MCDC) and the Dedham Institution for Savings closed on a 

construction loan for construction of the houses. 

The Committee and Medfield Community Development 
Corporation held a ground breaking ceremony attended by town 
and state officials, State Senator Chris Lane, the home 
buyers and many townspeople on August 2 2nd. 

In September, construction of the modular homes began 
and was completed by the end of December 1992. 

In spring of 1993 the roads, driveways, and sidewalks 
will receive their final paving and the last few lawns will 
also be completed. 



42 



THE DEVELOPMENT TEAM 

Medfield Community Development Corporation (MCDC) Board 
of Directors: President - Bonnie Wren-Burgess 

Vice President - Mary Ellen Thompson 
Treasurer - Charles Peck 
Clerk - Robert Ingram 
Director - Sharon Lowenthal 
Members - Margaret Bancroft 
Frank Murray 
Stephen Nolan 
William Priante, Sr. 
Fayre Stephenson 
Michael Sullivan 
Ann Thompson 
Project Director: Margaret E. Bancroft 
Contractor: Bilt-Rite Construction, Dorchester with 

Huntington Homes, E. Montpelier, Vermont 
Site Work: Metro Equipment Corporation, Roxbury 
Clerk of the Works: Thomas A. Copithorne, Medfield 
Attorney: Stephen M. Nolan, Hill & Barlow, 

A Professional Corporation, Boston 
Engineering: Kalkunte Engineering Corporation, 

Stoughton 
Construction Financing: Dedham Institution for Savings 
Site Work Financing: Massachusetts Small Cities Program 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bonnie Wren-Burgess, Chairperson 
Michael Sullivan Fayre Stephenson 
Ann B. Thompson Margaret Bancroft 

Stephen Nolan Charles H. Peck 

Peter Michelson Mary Thompson 

Sharon Lowenthal Frank Murray 




Governor Weld signs Allendale Land Transfer Bill. 
Observed by Christine Cochran, Senator Chris Lane, 
Medfield Community Development members Nolan, 
Bancroft and Wren-Burgess. 



43 




Allendale ground breaking - August 22, 1992 
(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press) 



44 




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ffc»ecT HJftU^tX HA*i»*=T tf^JSf 



PaPSSC 



Building Allendale. 





45 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Aging provides many services to 
our senior citizens. Most of our programs could not exist 
without our wonderful network of volunteers who come to the 
center every day, pick up the hot food packages and deliver 
them to home-bound people. (These volunteers also report 
any problems in the home that may need to be attended to) . 
We in turn refer these problems to families or people who can 
help, including the Medfield police and fire departments in 
emergency situations. 

The meals delivered to shut-ins are nutritiously 
balanced, and assure that these seniors have at least one 
good meal a day - plus a visitor! Our daily lunch programs 
(Monday - Friday) also serve a well balanced meal. Ruth 
Laracy, our manager, does a wonderful job to make sure that 
everyone's needs are met. We have 15-30 seniors who come 
each day to enjoy the meal and the company of people who care 
about them. They play board games, joke with each other and 
have a good time. If someone is sick or has a problem much 
concern and caring is shown. All newcomers are welcomed. 

The monthly HOPE newsletter informs people of upcoming 
events and such things as changes in Social Security or 
Medicare. People say that they love this little newsletter 
for its informative and humorous articles. F.O.S.I. (Friends 
of Seniors, Inc.) pays for the postage. 

We offer painting, crafts, and exercise classes for a 
fee of $2 per class. We also administer the U.S. Government 
quarterly food surplus program. Each month we offer a free 
blood pressure and health clinic provided by the Walpole 
V.N. A. The attendance at this clinic has exploded! Dr. 
Montague, a podiatrist, runs a monthly clinic for $10 a 
patient which is quite a bargain. 

Our annual free Flu immunization clinic, sponsored by 
the V.N. A. , served 266 people this year. The clinic serves 
Medfield residents of all ages who have respiratory problems 
and all citizens 65 and over. We are very indebted to the 
V.N. A. for their many services to our Community. 

Our "Bus for Us" continues to provide transportation in 
Medfield five days a week and 2 mall trips a month. We also 
provide transportation for disabled people. 

This fiscal year, we received a Formula Grant from the 
state for $2,188. The money was used to defray the costs of 
our program teachers and cover some of our newsletter 
expenses . 



46 



We are especially grateful to F.O.S.I., the Lions Club, 
American Legion, Women Auxiliary, Catholic Daughters, and 
Sportsman's Club for all that they have done this year to 
provide special occasions for our seniors. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Barbara J. Connors, Director 
Ben B. Korbly, Chairman 



ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my report for the year ending December 
31, 1992. 

All barns and livestock have been inspected and pass 
the requirements of the Town of Medfield and the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 



The following animals were registered in Medfield in 



1992: 



Beef 


8 


Beef heifers 


2 


Donkeys 


2 


Horses 


69 


Ponies 


4 


Sheep 


23 



In addition, 
geese and ducks. 



there are a number of domestic chickens, 



There was a significant decrease in dog bites in 1992. 
Eight were reported in Medfield this year, each one requiring 
a minimum ten-day quarantine of the animal. There was one 
report of a raccoon biting a dog. The raccoon was humanely 
destroyed and had a negative rabies test. Due to the 
increase of incidents of raccoon rabies, it is my 
recommendation that animal owners vaccinate not only their 
dogs and cats, as required by law, but also their horses. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jennifer A. Shaw, 
MEDFIELD ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



47 



BOARD OF APPEALS ON ZONING 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Board of Appeals acted on the following applications 
during 1992. 

GRANTED: Special Permit for temporary amusement - circus 

Special Permit to extend the Med-Vale nursing home 
Special Permit for a sewer line through a Flood 

Plain District 
Special Permit for an Open Space Residential 

development, Hawthorne Village 
An amendment to Comprehensive Permit granted to 
Medfield Community Development Corporation in 
1991 

Special Permit for a home occupation 
Special Permit to put a water line through a 

Watershed Protection District 
Variance from the required lot size 
One request to withdraw application 
Special Permit for a dentist's office 
Special Permit for a home in a Flood Plain 

District 



DENIED: Special Permit for temporary amusement 
Aquifer Protection District 
Variance for a deck on a house 



in the 



The Appeals Board would like to give its sincere thanks 
for all the support and consideration it has received this 
past year from the Town Boards and the residents of Medfield. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert F. Sylvia, Chairman 
Burgess P. Standley, Secretary 
Ralph C. Good, Jr., Member 
Sandra G. Munsey, Associate 
Charles H. Peck, Associate 
Kenneth M. Childs, Jr. , Associate 



48 



COUNCIL ON ARTS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Council on Arts sponsored several exciting 
events during the year 1992. Arts Council members kicked off 
the year by staging a major dramatic production, the Zullo 
Gallery held its fifth season, and an outdoor summer concert 
was held at Baker's Pond. 

The Arts Council's own Theatre Club presented "Strange 
Snow" at the Medfield High School on January 31 and February 
1, 1992. Arts Council members Frank Iafolla and Wendy 
Clarridge and Medfield resident Jim Horgan played the leading 
roles. The show was directed by Dick Pearl. Many Arts 
Council members and area volunteers worked diligently to 
produce the show. The performance was video taped and the 
tape is available to Medfield residents. The Theatre Club 
took the show on the road, performing in Framingham and at 
the New England Shelter for Homeless Veterans in Boston. 
Profits from the production were donated to the New England 
Shelter. 

The Zullo Gallery, a nonprofit gallery begun by the 
Arts Council, began the year with its first national 
printmakers exhibition sponsored in conjunction with the 
Boston Printmakers. Forty artists from around the country 
were selected to present their work. A variety of techniques 
were represented that resulted in many different kinds of 
prints being displayed such as wood engravings, intaglios, 
serigraphs, lithographs and monoprints. 

Subsequently, an "Exhibition of Contemporary Artists" 
featured Peter Wise, Robert Wood, Eric Mackey and Amy Cain. 

The third show of the year featured works from the 
Brickbottom Artists Cooperative in Somerville, MA. Urban 
landscapes by David Scholl and painted aluminum and bronze 
sculpture by Ovi Simonis were presented at the exhibit. The 
show was sponsored by FDC Packaging of Medfield and the 
Massachusetts Arts Lottery program (through the Medfield 
Council on Arts) . 

As in previous years, the Gallery was closed for the 
summer; however, it did not reopen in September as funding 
was sought for a full-time staff position. The Gallery has 
always been staffed by volunteers. After four years, it 
became evident that a full-time paid position was necessary 
if the Gallery was to remain open for 2 hours per week. 
Plans were made in December to open the Zullo Gallery only on 
weekends in 1993 and to present works of 10 local artists 
on a permanent basis rather than rotating shows, until 
financing can be found to fund the staff position. 



49 



In August, the Medfield Arts Council was pleased to 
present John Lincoln Wright and the Sour Mash Boys, an 
award-winning country western group, at a free outdoor 
concert at Meeting House (Baker's) Pond. The concert was 
another example of local business and the community 
supporting the arts, as APC Pest and Termite Control, Inc. of 
Medfield and the Medfield Park and Recreation Commission more 
than matched the grant from the Massachusetts Arts Lottery 
program to make the concert possible. 

The Massachusetts Arts Lottery allocates funds annually 
to each town which helps to support the arts and humanities. 
Awards granted by Medfield this year were: 

Medfield Council on Arts, $1,000. To continue the 
Zullo Gallery and stage a benefit/performing arts 
night. 

Medfield Council on Arts Theatre Group, $500. To stage 
a dramatic production. 

Neponset Choral Society, $100. 1992-1993 Season: 
Three Programs. 

Very Special Arts Massachusetts, $100. Fourth Annual 
Adult Festival. 

Medfield Council on Arts. $54 3. To hold a second 
annual outdoor summer concert. 

Performing Arts Student Series (PASS program) : 
Medfield Dale Street School, $600. Fourth and fifth 
grade students to attend "Islands of Anyplace" at the 
American Repertory Theatre. 

The Council on Arts wishes to thank the Town of 
Medfield and its citizens for continuing to support our 
efforts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marie Zack Nolan, Chairperson 
Martha Moon, Treasurer 
Mary Ann Hates, Secretary 
Lucinda Davis, PASS Coordinator 
Connie Jones, Publicity 
Timothy Ryan 
Wendy Clarridge 
Jeffrey Masters 
Rosalie Shirley 
William Pope 
Frances Iafolla 
Gordon Jackson 



50 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

We entered 1992 continuing to work on contentions by a 
small number of taxpayers that their values were too high 
while continuing to hear from those who felt the decline in 
the real estate market should not have affected their values 
on the downside. Our consulting appraiser reviewed each 
application and in most instances, the Board accepted his 
recommendations adjusting where appropriate. 

We also continued with the quarterly billing program 
which allows revenue to be collected on a systematic basis 
eliminating a need to borrow in anticipation and providing 
extra time for setting a new rate for actual billing in 
December. This program appears to be working effectively. 

Although trends now show the number of home sales to 
have increased over the past calendar year, lower prices are 
still reflected in our overall FY 1993 town valuation of 
(1991) $779,209,227, an increase of less than 9,000,000 over 
FY 1992. When combined with all other factors for the year, 
this resulted in a tax rate of $14.59, an increase of $.53. 
Again the Selectmen, on Assessors' advice, voted to have one 
single tax rate for all classes of property: Residential, 
commercial, industrial and personal. 

Voters, for the second year, rejected an article 
submitted by the Assessors to Town Meeting to allow taxpayers 
to qualify for exemptions if they added to their owner 
occupied domicile to provide housing for someone over the age 
of 65. However, they approved an increased qualifying level 
of $3 0,000 for tax deferral applicants. This exemption 
provides an opportunity for persons over 65, with limited 
assets, to defer payment until sale of the property or death 
of the applicant, with a payment and interest of 8% per year 
for each year's deferral. Although opponents feared many 
more applicants would take advantage of this benefit, this 
has not happened. 

The Board does not anticipate great value changes in 
the year ahead and unfortunately, this may mean higher tax 
rates again. We will enter a term where we will be paying on 
a debt incurred by vote of the town for high school 
renovation and addition as an override of Proposition 2 1/2. 
Our greatest hope is that a large new growth amount from new 
lots in subdivisions will offset some of these negatives for 
an increased tax base. 



51 



Again, our thanks to our patient staff who face the 
public daily on our behalf. It has been a fairly peaceful 
year, but as always, we try to attend educational meetings to 
keep up with changes in laws and procedures put into effect 
by the legislature and Department of Revenue in order to do 
our job better. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Carol A. Rossi, Chairman 
William 0. Walsh, Clerk 
Clara E. Doub 




Congressman John Joseph Moakley shakes hand 
young "constituent" at a visit to town hall. 
(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press) 



with 



52 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

THE CEMETERY, A SUPERNATURAL LANDSCAPE 

Most people think of cemeteries as merely a final 
resting place of the dead, often conjuring images that focus 
on fear and sadness. But cemeteries are a significant open 
space in a community, reflecting its social, cultural and 
historic makeup. Cemeteries are more than a place to grieve 
over the loss of a loved one; they are a place to celebrate 
life. 

The "Rural Cemetery Movement" is the precursor to the 
American park movement. Visitors could escape the grime and 
bustle of urban life and enjoy the tranquility of naturalized 
landscapes displaying the best in sculpture, architecture, 
and nature. Parks were later designed in the same tradition. 

Cemeteries form a unique part of a community's 
recreational system when open and accessible to all. They 
offer opportunities for walking, jogging, and bike riding and 
often have picnic areas, play areas, and skating ponds. Vine 
Lake has a pond and sitting areas that invite relaxation and 
contemplation . 

Rural cemeteries like Vine Lake are designed to create 
a naturalized environment. An assortment of vegetation 
attracts wildlife and creates a retreat from urban 
structures. Cemeteries are galleries with a variety of 
natural and man-made art forms. Because they are a 
reflection of the culture and history of the area and its 
descendants, cemeteries can be viewed as outdoor museums. 
They also provide an historical record of the community. 
Visitors become familiar with people who used to live in the 
area. 

Cemeteries offer opportunities for memorials that 
celebrate, honor, and remember life, but they can be so much 
more. These special landscapes serve a formal function as a 
place of final disposition but also informally as a space to 
be enjoyed for recreation, education, and commemoration. We 
are proud of Vine Lake Cemetery, and we are working to keep 
it a supernatural landscape. 

During 1992 there were 56 Burials, 11 Cremations and 45 
Lots sold. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Eric W. O'Brien, Chairman 
David McCue, Clerk 
Walter Reynolds 



53 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

I hereby submit my Annual Report as Civil Defense 
Director for the year ending December 31, 1992. 

The Civil Defense Director's responsibilities are to 
act as a liaison between the Selectmen and the Town 
Departments in the event of a declared emergency. As of 
1988, the Civil Defense Director has actively participated in 
the HAZMAT Emergency Planning Committee in and outside of the 
town. 

The Civil Defense Director is also in charge of the 
Auxiliary Police organization under the Chief of Police. 

In addition to our compulsory drills on July 4th and 
Halloween, the Auxiliary Police and Radio operators were 
requested to assist in the following events during 1992: 

Memorial Day Parade 
Annual Road Race 
Medfield Day (MEMO) 
Christmas Parade 

In addition to the above, the department was called 
upon to provide emergency assistance during the blizzard of 
December 12, 1992. A shelter was set up and manned 
throughout the storm. A radio communications link with the 
Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency (MEMA) was 
established and maintained, and assistance was provided to 
the police department. Manpower and emergency vehicles were 
used in the patrol of the town, damage assessment, and 
traffic control. 

I wish to remind the people of Medfield that in an 
emergency it is possible to arrange for shelter and showers 
at one of the schools. 



Town residents interested in making use of our Civil Defense 
services or in membership should contact the Civil Defense 
Director at 359-4519. 

I would like to thank the men and women of the 
Auxiliary Police for their cooperation throughout the year. 
Also, I wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Michael 
Sullivan and his staff, and Police Chief, Hurley. 

Respectfully submitted, , 

Vincent M. Cellucci 
CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 



54 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Conservation Commission administers the 
Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 
131, sec. 40, and the Medfield Wetlands Bylaw. Anyone 
proposing to alter in any way a wetland or land subject to 
flooding, or to perform work within 100 feet of either, must 
file with the Commission a Request for a Determination of 
Applicability or a Notice of Intent and before starting the 
work must receive a determination that the Act is not 
applicable or an Order of Conditions (a detailed permit) . 
The Order of Conditions must be recorded and imposes a lien 
on the property. When the work has been completed 
satisfactorily under the Order of Conditions, the Commission 
may vote to issue a release of the lien, called a certificate 
of compliance. 

Under the Bylaw, an applicant who will not complete 
work within one year from the date the Order of Conditions 
was issued must request an extension of the Order or else the 
order will lapse and the work must halt. 

By issuing an Enforcement order, the Commission may 
compel anyone not complying with the Act or the Bylaw to stop 
working. Anyone found in violation of the Act is subject to 
imprisonment for up to two years and a penalty of up to 
$25,000 for each violation. 

In 1992, the Commission reviewed the following projects 
and issued the type of document indicated: 

Orders of Conditions: 

1. Ralph Costello. Grist Mill Pond Estates, 169 South 
Street, Residential subdivision. DEP File No. 214-162. 

2. Oxbow Realty, Inc. Overfield Estates, Pine St., Lot 
P-3R. Single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 214-169. 

3. Brisson Design & Development. Lot A-2 , 154 Harding 
St., Single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 214-170. 

4. Town of Medfield, Kingsbury Pond Committee. Cutting 
of trees and brush at Kingsbury Pond, Spring St. DEP File 
No. 214-171. 

5. Norfolk Hunt Club, Cutting of trees and brush, 
restoration of banks of brook on Lots 1, 6, 13, North Street 
(opposite no. 243). DEP File No. 214-172. 

6. Hoover Realty Trust, Woodcliff Estates: 
a. Single-family dwellings: 



55 



1) Lot 58 Boyden Road, DEP File No. 214-173. 

2) Lot 59, Boyden Road, DEP File No. 214-174. 

3) Lot 61, Boyden Road, DEP File No. 214-175. 

4) Lot 78 (Substituted Order of Conditions for 

Parcel A), DEP File No. 214-148. 

b. Phase II of subdivision, at end of Flintlocke Lane 
and Green St. Detention basins. DEP File No. 214-176. 

7. O'Connor, Neal. Lot 12, 48 Bridge St. Extension of 
sewer main to Charles River Interceptor. DEP File No. 
214-177. 

8. Town of Medfield Highway Department. Replacement of 
culvert under Noon Hill Road at Holt's Pond. DEP File No. 
214-178. 

9. Town of Medfield. Allendale Housing Project, Dale 
St. Detention basin DEP File No. 214-180. 

10. Eramo Building Corp. Pondview Estates. 
Single-family dwellings: 

a. Lot 18-A, Pondview Ave. DEP File No. 214-179. 

b. Lot 2, Stuart St. DEP File No. 214-182. 

c. Lot D, Pondview Ave. DEP File No. 214-183. 

11. Murphy, Paul. 6 Stagecoach Road. Construction of 
replacement septic field and removal of fill from wetland. 
DEP File No. 214-181. 

12. Woodland Country Homes. North Meadows Road. 3 
single-family dwellings. DEP File No. 214-184. 

13. Brook Run Development Corp.: 

a. Lot 2 Causeway St. Single-family dwelling. 
DEP File No. 214-185 

b. Extension of water main up Causeway St. from 
Orchard St. DEP File No. 214-187. 

14. Kettle Pond Trust. Lot 14, Plain St. Single-family 
dwelling. DEP File No. 214-188. 

15. Falco, Kerry. Lot 5, Willow Circle. Single-family 
dwelling. DEP File No. 214-189. 

16. Robartes, Jay and Julie. Lot 1, 24 Wight St. 
Septic field for single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 
214-190 

17. LaPlante, Stephen. 19 Philip St. Addition to 
single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 214-193. 

Requests for a Determination of Applicability: 

1. R.P. Rowean Construction Co. Lot 31, Lawrence 
Circle. Single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 214-152. 



56 



2. Clark, Bradford. Causeway St. at Dwight St. 
Single-family dwelling. 

3. Frawley, William J., III. Lot 69, 34 Pederzini Dr. 
Request to extend lawn towards stream behind house. 

Certification of Compliance: 

1. Kilcommons, James and Barbara. Lot 3, 5 Village 
Way. Single-family dwelling. DEP File No. 214-168. 

2. Norfolk Hunt Club. North Street grounds. DEP File 
No. 214-72 

3. Yered, George and Keleher, Robert. 11 West Mill St. 
Stabilizing embankment around commercial building. DEP File 
No. 214-73. 

4. Hoover Realty Trust: 

a. Lot 61, Boyden Road. Single-family dwelling. 
DEP File No. 214-175. 

b. Lot 71, Pederzini Drive. Single-family 
dwelling. DEP File No. 214-155. 

c. Lot 78, Parcel A, Woodcliff Estates. DEP File 
No. 214-148. To clear confusion in chain of title. 

5. Oxbow Realty, Inc. Lots P-16R, P-17R, P-18R, 
N-19-20, N-21, N-22, N-23-24, Overfield Estates, Pine St. 

6. G & P Realty Trust. 104 Adams St. Removal of fill 
and restoration of wetland. DEP File No. 214-146. 

Enforcement Orders: 

1. Delapa Realty Trust. Wampatuck Estates, Main St. 
near Dover line. Failure to prevent others from dumping near 
wetlands; failure to control drainage during construction. 

Azargoon, Mostafa. Frances Cafe, Frairy St. Filling of 
wetland. 

As I write this report in January 1993, Medfield's 
wetlands are serving the Town well. The major snowstorm in 
December 1992 and heavy rains and mild temperatures in the 
following weeks produced abundant runoff. Our largest 
wetland, the Charles River floodplain, is containing much of 
it and is flooded out to Main Street and North Meadows Road. 
Acting like a giant sponge to absorb all this water, the 
wetland will slowly recharge the Charles River Aquifer, which 
supplies half the Town wells. Vegetation in the wetland will 
draw up some of the water and release it into the air. 
Wetland plants will absorb some of the contaminants in the 
water. The soil in the wetland will break down other 
contaminants as it filters and purifies water before passing 
it into the aquifer. 



57 



Everyone is subject to the Act and the Bylaw; not just 
builders, but the Town, Town boards, private nonprofit 
groups, and homeowners as well. Protecting wetlands involves 
more than preventing illegal dumping and filling, or 
encouraging developers to build as far away from wetlands as 
possible; it requires thoughtfulness in the decisions we make 
every day. Wetlands can be degraded by poorly designed 
road-maintenance projects, overuse or careless application of 
lawn chemicals, and the careless disposal of yard waste. 
Anything that can fall onto a road — oil, gasoline, deicing 
chemicals, silt — will end up in our water supply if we use 
our brooks and swamps as drainage ditches. It is preferable 
by far to divert runoff from roads onto uplands, where 
microbes in the soil can break down contaminants. 
Herbicides, pesticides. fertilizers, and sewage from septic 
fields drain toward the water table. Grass clippings, 
leaves, and branches illegally placed in brooks or swamps rob 
the water of oxygen as they decay. 

Our water resources are under great pressure from 
increased development: the more roads and houses, the more 
runoff; the less open space, the greater the load on wetlands 
and the less their ability to neutralize contaminants. 
Medfield has always taken pride in the quality of its water. 
If we want to continue using our aquifers for our water 
supply, we must be diligent in protecting our wetlands. The 
alternative will be expensive: being forced to tap into the 
MWRA system. 

On September 17, 1992 the Commission voted to approve a 
regulation under the Wetlands Bylaw requiring fees for 
various applications, extensions, and releases. These fees 
are in addition to those due under the Act and will be used 
to defray our expenses, especially wages for a part-time 
worker we hope to hire in 1993. 

We invite anyone interested in helping to preserve 
wetlands to join us. We meet in the Town House the first and 
third Thursdays of each month at 7:30 p.m. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Craig S. Harwood, Chairman 
John A. Thompson, Vice Chairman 
Denise Yrukofsky, Secretary 
Scott D. Ptiz 
Lee Howell 
Douglas S. Sparrow 
Caroline D. Standley 
Theresa A. Cos, Associate 
Betty A. Kaerwer, Associate 
Ralph A. Parmigiane, Associate 
James G. White, Jr., Associate and 
Treasurer 



58 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The calendar year of 1992 again showed continuing growth in 
the workload for the Board of Health agents, staff members 
and our contracting agencies. Complicated repairs of 
septic systems constructed prior to Title 5 and new 
requirements of Title 5 found our consulting agent/ engineer 
spending more time supplying information and on consulting 
services. Our Sanitary Inspector likewise supplied many 
hours of consulting services to prospective business 
developers of food service establishments. 

SANITATION: John J. Keefe R.S. has served as Board of Health 
agent for eighteen years. As agent for the board, he made 
inspections of food service establishments and retail food 
stores and gave consultation and advice to requests and 
investigated food related complaints. Consultations were held 
by Mr. Keefe dealing with various public health issues with 
school, highway, town administrative, police and fire 
personnel and State Hospital personnel throughout the year. 

Under the provision of Chapter II of the State Sanitary Code 
covering minimum standards for human habitation, Mr. Keefe 
made inspections of dwelling units during the year which 
resulted from complaints and random inspections of rental 
housing. Where violations of the State Sanitary Code were 
found, the owner or occupant was ordered to take corrective 
action and follow-up inspections were made to insure 
compliance. Mr. Keefe also made miscellaneous inspections 
which included the public bathing beach, semi public pools, 
laundromats, gas stations, shopping centers, the landfill and 
the transfer station. Regular inspections of school 
cafeterias and nursery schools were carried out throughout 
the year. 

The Board of Health, recognizing their responsibility to 
protect and improve the health of the residents of the town, 
adopted Regulations dealing with smoking in public places and 
workplaces and with the sale and distribution of tobacco 
products . 

BOARD OF HEALTH PERMITS ISSUED 

Restaurants, counter bars, cafeteria food 

service and vending machines 2 2 

Food stores and markets 6 
Temporary food service permits 

Bakeries 3 

Laundromats 1 

Funeral Director 1 

Tanning Facilities 1 

Limited food service (party room) 1 

Caterer 1 

Mobile Food Server 1 

Frozen dessert 2 

59 



ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING : 

As the town continues to experience growth and the number of 
residences increases, the load on our environment increases. 
Recognizing this, the Board of Health has been active in 
cooperation with other boards and committees, stressing the 
need for proper management of the town's natural resources, 
particularly, the protection of our water resources. 

Our agent and consulting professional engineer, William R. 
Domey, has provided engineering assistance to town residents 
and reviewed plans for future development. With storm water 
management regulations in effect, reviews of subdivision 
plans, plans for septic system designs for new construction, 
proposals for repairs of existing systems and drainage 
details for site plan review afford a greater protection of 
the environment. Such reviews constitute some of the many 
services rendered by the board engineer. In order to 
determine if sewage disposal systems are adequate for 
proposed alterations or additions to existing dwellings, the 
board adopted guidelines to obtain building permits. 

The following is a list of number of reviews and inspections 
and related permits issued: 

On-site soil tests 97 

New plan reviews 118 

Disposal Works Construction Permit 29 

Construction inspections 103 

Repair permits issued 13 

Installers' permits issued 23 

Subdivision plan reviews 4 plans 

(Preliminary & Definitive) 

Well permits issued 3 
Septage Handler & Carters' permits issued 16 

Swimming pool reviews (private pools) 8 
Review of plans for additions & renovations 71 

Review of septic system repair plans 51 

Sewerage complaints and investigations were conducted 
throughout the year , compliance orders were issued, hearings 
were held for variances to Title 5 and meetings with related 
town boards relative to review of decisions affecting the 
public health constituted additional services of Mr. Domey. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

Jennifer Shaw Verrochi, the town's Animal Inspector continues 
her dedicated service. Her report is contained separately in 
this Town Report. Permits for horses, animals and for 
stables for 1992 totaled 21 and 1 permit was issued for a 
Veterinary Clinic. Recognizing the threat of a Rabies 
epidemic spreading to the Medfield area, the board undertook 
a program to educate the citizens of the town to the disease, 
the importance of staying away from wild animals and of 
having their domestic pets, especially cats, vaccinated. 
They also promoted the pre-exposure inoculations of all town 
personnel who might be exposed to possible rabid animals. 



60 



CONTRACTS WITH HUMAN SERVICE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 

The South Norfolk County Association for Retarded Citizens, 
SNCARC has been serving the community of Medfield since 1954 
and has been financially supported with a donation from 
Medfield since 1972. Seven types of programs serve Medfield 
residents as follows: 1. Vocational Training through 
Lifeworks Employment Services in Norwood, serving six 
Medfield residents; 2. Lifeworks Day Habilitation and NCE 
Pre-vocational program in Norwood, serving one Medfield 
resident; 3. Community Residential Facilities serving two 
Medfield residents; 4. Family Support/Advocacy to all 
Medfield families who request these services; 5. 
Social-Recreational and Special Olympics for 9 residents with 
disabilities; 6. Respite Care in Medfield families' homes, 
on weekends, and summer camp for Medfield children, serving 
17 Medfield residents; 7. Elder Services to Medfield 
citizens who are elderly and disabled. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

The Walpole Area Visiting Nurse Association serves the Board 
of Health in the capacity of public health nursing services 
for the residents of Medfield. This agency has experienced a 
continuing 30% growth in overall visits in 1992. The total 
number of visits was 50,000 in 1992 and was approximately 
60,000 in 1992. The clinical staff has increased 
accordingly. Referrals have increased by 25-30% most 
significantly from the Boston hospitals. Despite this 
growth, overall operations of the WAVNA continue to be 
efficient and effective. In addition to established 
services, WAVNA increased its offerings of childbirth 
education classes, breast-feeding classes, prenatal and 
postnatal exercise classes, and cholesterol screenings. 
Office hours are held daily at the Walpole, 55 West Street, 
office. A new Mental Health Program was started in 1991, 
offering psychiatric nursing care to clients with mental 
health problems who are having difficulty coping and are 
unable to access existing services. WAVNA continues to 
provide programs in Health Promotion in addition tc 
traditional home health services. The four major components 
of the Health Promotion Program are: Health Maintenance for 
the elderly; Maternal/Child Health; Communicable Disease and 
Public Health. 

The Town of Medfield Public Health Statistics for 1992 are as 
follows: 



SERVICE 



Home Visits/Health Maintenance 

Maternal/Child Health Visits 

Office Visits 

Communicable Disease Follow-Up 

Senior Citizen Clinics 

Flu Clinic 



61 



VISITS 


VISITS 


1992 


1991 


128 


156 


18 


20 


58 


38 


1 


9 


283 


191 


305 


255 



OUTREACH PROGRAM 

The Medfield Youth Outreach program, administered by the 
Board of Health and advised by the Outreach Advisory 
Committee, continues to be a program supported by the town. 
The focus of the Outreach position has traditionally been and 
remains crisis intervention and prevention, short and some 
long term counseling, information and referrals, community 
and client liaison, advocacy, and the Peer 
Counseling/Leadership program. The confidential services are 
offered free of charge to Medfield youth and their families. 
Elizabeth Newton completed her second year as director of the 
program in October. New program development in 1992 included 
"It Takes a Village to Raise a Child" Parent Training 
Program, continued program development in the diversion 
program by including an alcohol and other drug education 
group, work with Goals 1 and 6 on Medfield 2000, 
co-facilitating the Warriors Call to Excellence evenings, and 
acting as a catalyst to organize a committee to develop a 
traditional "All Night Graduation Party" for graduating 
seniors. 

In 1992, clients were referred to the Outreach office by the 
schools (27%) , police (25%) , courts (0%) , family members 
(9%), self (28%), and other sources (11%) including clergy, 
local professionals, and state agencies. In most cases 
concerning minor children, parents or other family members 
became involved in meetings. Consultation with school 
personnel, police, other service providers, and community 
agencies also occurred. Major issues dealt with throughout 
the calendar year included: 

separation/divorce restraining orders 

parenting issues grief/ loss 

substance abuse issues teenage pregnancy 

financial difficulties depression 

family issues homelessness 

school anxiety juvenile delinquency 

self esteem issues unemployment 

runaway hunger (family) 

acquaintance rape attempted suicide 

The Peer Counseling program continues to be a success. 
Students are trained to provide assistance, support and 
improved listening skills for peers in town. After training, 
Peer Counselors are available to help orientate all new 
students to the high school, including the freshmen class and 
to work with younger students on a "Big Buddy" capacity. 
The Outreach Worker is responsible for recruiting and 
selecting all Peer Counselors, developing and administering 
all training and meetings and has overall supervision of the 
program consulting with individual Peer Counselors as they 
work with their "clients." The Outreach worker also shares 
equal responsibility in leading the Peer Leadership program 
which involves the Peer Counselors and Peer Educators (a drug 
and alcohol program in the high school) . 

The Outreach worker participates in a number of organizations 
on a regular basis including: Association of Municipal 
Administrators of Youth and Family Services (AMAYFS) , Youth 
Advisory Committee, and the Medfield Home Committee. 

62 



Clinical supervision is provided by-monthly by Dimension 
House counselor, Thomas Hughart. 

The Outreach office is located on the upper second floor of 
the Town Hall. The telephone number is 359-7121 and messages 
may be left 2 4 hours a day. Informational brochures on a 
variety of issues are available at the office. 

The Board of Health holds its meetings on the first Wednesday 
and the third Monday evening at 6:30 P.M. on the second floor 
of Town Hall. These meetings are open to the public and 
citizens are invited to attend and participate. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joan F. Willgohs, Chairman 
Heidi Groff, Clerk 
Neil D. MacKenzie 



63 



MEDFIELD HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Let us begin this 1992 report by clarifying a point of 
widespread confusion: the Medfield Historical Commission and 
the Medfield Historical Society are not the same thing; they 
are two different but complementary organizations. 

The Historical Commission is appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, funded by the Town Meeting (historically, if 
you'll pardon the pun, to the tune of $600 per year), and has 
certain statutory authority. Its monthly meetings in the 
Town Hall, usually on the second or third Wednesday of each 
month, are open to the public. 

The Historical Society is a private, nonprofit 
organization; its membership includes Medfield history buffs 
across the country. The society holds monthly 
meeting/programs in the vestry of the Unitarian church (which 
is in the National Register of Historic Places) . The 
Historical Society building behind the Library on Pleasant 
Street is open for historical research and good fellowship 
most Saturday mornings. 

The Massachusetts Historical Commission was established 
by the State Legislature in 1963 to identify, evaluate, and 
protect important historical and archaeological assets in the 
Commonwealth. The local Historical Commission is the 
municipal agency responsible for ensuring that preservation 
concerns are considered in community planning and development 
decisions. The Medfield Historical Commission was 
established in 1973; Donald MacDonald is a charter member. 

New Walking Tour of Medfield Brochure 

Although the Commission meets just once a month, 1992 
was a very productive year. Thanks to Burgess P. Standley, 
we updated and printed a new Walking Tour of Medfield 
brochure, which contains information about 2 3 historic sites 
in town. At Medfield Day 1992 we sold 44 copies. Copies are 
available from the Commission. 

Demolition Delay Bylaw Proposal 

Although we regard Medfield as a beautiful town, we 
recognize that, as in most other communities, the wrecking 
ball and the Sherman tank have claimed buildings which, in 
retrospect, should likely have been preserved. 

Accordingly, we will propose a demolition delay bylaw 
to the voters at the 1993 Annual Town Meeting. 



64 



Economics may sometimes dictate that a dilapidated 
historic structure must be torn down; such is life. But if 
adopted by the voters, the new bylaw would prescribe hearings 
and other procedures to assure that no historically 
significant structure is torn down before all reasonable 
efforts have been made to rehabilitate or restore it. 

Joint Historic Preservation Award 

Last summer, with our annual Historic Preservation 
Award, the Commission honored two people who arguably have 
done more than anyone else over the past 2 years to promote 
the understanding and appreciation of Medfield 's history: 
Paul and Toni Hurd. The Commission and the Town are indebted 
to them. 

Paul Hurd was president of the Medfield Historical 
Society for 20 years; he stepped down in 1992 and was 
succeeded by Fred Clarridge. During his tenure membership 
increased substantially, including many out-of-state members, 
and the Peak House and Society archives have been opened up 
to the public, as present or former students in Richard 
DeSorgher's eighth-grade social studies class will attest. 

Toni Hurd spent some 15 years organizing and 
cataloguing the contents of the Historical Society's building 
behind the library on Pleasant Street (the site of the old 
Medfield Cooperative Bank) . She has transformed the piles of 
disorganized old files into an invaluable historical 
resource. You can find what you're looking for, thanks to 
Toni Hurd. 

Historic Property Gift 

There is a small granite quarry off Lakewood Terrace, 
which is part of a subdivision off Granite Street, in the 
south end of Medfield. Workers building a house a few years 
ago discovered this long-forgotten quarry, which was 
abandoned before the last two millstones were completed. 

The Commission believes that the millstones had been 
intended for the grist mill near Kingsbury Pond, since the 
quarry, like the mill, was once Kingsbury family property. 

On December 28, 1992, the new owners, John Copeland and 
Linda Baldini of 43 Rocky Lane, donated about 3,000 square 
feet of land containing the quarry. The gift was made to the 
town, in the care and custody of the Medfield Historical 
Commission. We are very grateful to John Copeland and Linda 
Baldini and to all other past and future donors. Such gifts 
are tax-deductible. 

Medfield Town Archives 

One of the Historical Commission's long-term goals is 
to establish a town archives. In 1992 the Commission did 
further research on the subject of town archives. Two 
members attended a day-long seminar, sponsored by SPNEA, the 



65 



Society for the Preservation of New 
about setting up municipal archives. 



England Antiquities, 



Priscilla Ritter, longtime archivist for the City of 
Newton, gave us a very informative presentation in January, 
1992. We visited the Historical Society's archives on 
Pleasant Street and the Concord town archives. The latter 
occupies some 3,000 square feet in a temperature and humidity 
controlled environment in the basement of the Concord Public 
Library. (We wanted to see how the other half lives!) 

Two questions that need to be addressed at the 
beginning of the project are where to put the archives and 
what should be in them, so as not to duplicate what the 
Historical Society has already done so well. The Historical 
Society building is quite crowded. Part of the Town Hall 
basement appears underutilized, but we have not determined 
whether that space could be made available or made suitable 
for the town archives. 

The biggest obstacle to establishing the town archives 
is the amount of time required to do it; we are now adding 
Commission members with time, enthusiasm, and skills for 
archives. 

We Want Your Participation 

We sometimes have turnover in the Commission as 
members' personal circumstances change; we always try first 
to fill vacancies from the ranks of the associate members. 
There is no limit to the number of associate members we can 
have; let us know if you would like to be appointed. The 
only requirements are an interest in local history, and 
Medfield residency. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David F. Temple, Chairman 

Paul E. Nyren, Treasurer 

Priscilla Batting, Secretary 

Donald J. MacDonald 

Richard L. Reinemann 

Burgess P. Standley 

Eleanor Anes, Associate Member 

Richard DeSorgher, Associate Member 

John Hooper, Associate Member 

David L. Wilmarth, Associate Member 



66 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Housing Authority is pleased to submit its 
Annual Report for 1992. 

The Authority is authorized by and operates under the 
provisions of Chapter 12 IB of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
It is entirely funded through the Executive Office of 
Communities and Development and is responsible to EOCD for 
the management of low income housing. 

For information and/or application for housing at 
Tilden Village, please contact the Executive Director, Marie 
K. Roberts, at 3 59-6454 Monday through Thursday mornings. 

John P. 0' Toole retired from the Housing Authority in 
April. His many years of dedicated service will be greatly 
missed, and we wish him a healthy and happy retirement. Paul 
Hinkley was hired for this position. 

The Medfield Housing Authority regularly meets on the 
third Monday of each month at 7:30 P.M. in the office at 
Tilden Village, 30 Pound Street. The general public is 
welcome to attend these meetings. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard D. Jordan, Chairman 
L. Paul Galante, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Mary Ellen Thompson, Treasurer 
Diane Nightingale, Secretry 
Valerie Mariani, State Member 



67 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is our annual report for the year ending 
December 31, 1992: 



DEPARTMENT 


PERMITS 


INSPECTIONS 


INCOME 


EXPENSES 




1991 


1992 


1991 


1992 


1991 


1992 


1991 1992 


BUILDING 


209 


284 


1077 


908 


$36,270 


$50,499 


$19,661 

$23,743 


PLUMBING 


144 


169 


199 


241 


7,151 


9,315 


3,659 

4,656 


GAS 


217 


116 


125 


146 


3,245 


3,803 


1,694 

2,627 


WIRING 


192 


272 


394 


613 


11,292 


16,055 


6,955 

11,085 



Total revenue from the issuance of permits and fees for 
inspections for the calendar year 1992 was $79,672 as 

compared to $57,958 in 1991. Expenses for 1992 were $42,111 
as compared to $31,969 in 1991. 

BUILDING INSPECTION 

A breakdown of building permits issued is listed below: 

New single family dwellings 65 

Multi Family (Condo's) 5 

Complete partially finished single dwellings 3 

Additions to private dwellings 54 

Renovations to private dwellings 68 
Additions & renovations to business and 

industrial buildings 8 

New industrial/business buildings 1 

Family Apartments 

2 Family Apartments 3 

Reshingling roof & installation of sidewalls 21 

Private swimming pools 8 

Accessory buildings 5 

Residential garages 5 

Demolitions 5 

Tents (temporary) & Construction trailers 7 

Signs 15 

Stoves (solid fuel burning/chimneys) 10 

Carnival 1 

TOTAL 284 

Occupancy certificates were issued for 3 2 new 
residences in 1992 as compared to 21 in 1991. 

Inspections for certification of business, schools, 

multifamily dwellings, nursing homes and nursery schools 
amounted to 43 inspections for 1992. 



68 



Estimated construction costs on permits issued: 

1991 1992 

New Dwellings $4,500,000 8,283,000 

Renovations & additions, pools, 

shingling, sidewalls, etc. on 

residential 1,656,329 3,004,184 

New construction business 

and industry -0- 10,000 

Renovations & additions business 

and industry 755,564 321,500 

Multifamily buildings -0- 725,000 

Two Family Dwellings -0- 200,000 

Family apartments -0- -0- 

Enforcement of the State Building Code continues to be 
the responsibility of the local building inspectors. 
Legislation effective 7/1/92 requiring contractors to be 
registered with the Commonwealth became the responsibility of 
the Inspection Department staff to institute procedural 
changes for compliance. The office of the Inspection 
Department also keeps an accurate registration of builders 
holding State Construction Supervisor licenses in order to 
assure compliance with Section 109.1.1 of the State Building 
Code. The building inspectors continue the enforcement of the 
code by making inspections of schools, churches and rest 
homes as well as other places of assembly on a periodic 
basis. 

The Inspector of Buildings also serves the town in the 
capacity of Enforcing Officer for Zoning and as such made 38 
inspections to investigate complaints and inquiries brought 
to his attention both by residents as well as other town 
boards and departments. 

The assistance and cooperation of Fire Chief Kingsbury 
during inspections was greatly appreciated. The Fire Chief 
and the Inspectors continue to inspect smoke detectors in new 
construction and in additions and renovations as well as 
inspecting the installation of solid fuel burning appliances. 
Residents are reminded of the importance of having their 
wood stove installations inspected and certified in 
accordance with requirements of the Massachusetts State 
Building Code. 

PLUMBING AND GAS INSPECTION 

The purpose of the position of the Plumbing and Gas 
Inspector is to administer, investigate and enforce the 
Uniform State Plumbing Code and State Fuel Gas Code. Unlike 
other trades, plumbing or gas permits cannot be issued to 
homeowners. They can only be issued to a licensed Journeyman 
or a Master Plumber. Plumbing or gas cannot be installed, 
altered, removed, replaced, or repaired until a permit has 
been issued by the Inspector of Plumbing or Gas. The 
inspection department will be glad to help you make the 
determination concerning the need for plumbing and gas 
permits. When a citizen of the town requests the plumber or 
gas fitter to apply for a permit, he is getting the assurance 

69 



that the installation will not only be installed correctly 
and safely, but also that the work will be installed by a 
professional and not exploited by non professionals. It is 
definitely in the homeowner's interest to insist on 
inspections by qualified town inspectors knowledgeable in 
their trade. It is money well spent in times where every 
penny counts. All inspectors are issued Medfield Photo 
Identification Cards. Remember to ask them for their I.D. 
before allowing them to enter your home. 

The Plumbing Code is constantly being changed and 
upgraded to try to give the consumer and the plumber a 
direction that will assure a safe installation. Of great 
concern lately is the installation of backflow prevention 
devices, where necessary to insure the continuance of the 
good clean potable water supply of which we are very proud in 
Medfield. 

WIRING INSPECTION 

The Wiring Inspector continues to enforce the 
Massachusetts Electric Code as well as the National Electric 
Code in his inspections of electric installations for which 
permits are issued. Residents are reminded that the 
permitting process is in effect to assure safe and correct 
installations. The inspectors spend many hours giving 
answers to questions and advice to homeowners relative to 
electrical work. The assistance of Tauno Aalto and James 
Leonard during the periodic absences of the Wiring Inspector 
was greatly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. 0' Toole, Inspector of Buildings 
Anthony Calo, Local Insp. of Buildings 
Joseph F. Erskine, Inspector of Wires 
John A. Rose Jr., Plumbing Inspector 
Peter Navis, Gas Inspector 



70 



KINGSBURY POND COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The 1992 work season at the Grist Mill began in March. 
Over the winter the new lift gate had been built by a 
committee member and on Saturday, March 14, it was installed 
onto the frame erected in 1991. This gate is to control the 
flow of water through the mill to the turbine; it is not a 
way to maintain the pond at a specific level. 

Early in the year Mr. Perham (millwright) and helper 
installed four new tenoned uprights spanning the space 
between the previously installed new bottom timbers up into 
the mortises in the old upper timbers. Diagonal bracing for 
the uprights is still to be done. 

Also early in the year, Mr. Perham constructed a 
massive crane of white oak and hickory. When the ironwork 
part of it is complete, and it is put in place, it will be 
used to lift, swing aside and turn over the upper millstone 
so that it can be sharpened. For now, he has jacked up the 
top stone and rolled it to one side where it is supported by 
the floor joists and lally columns. This was done to take 
its approximately 5000 pound weight off the shaft and from 
over anyone working in the pit below. 

The pit needed a lot of work. In the spring it was 
noted that the stone supporting pier built in 1991 had 
shifted. It had been erected, it was thought, on a sound 
foundation, but what appeared to be ledge turned out to be 
huge rocks which had been dumped in there some time in the 
past, along with a lot of gravel. Perhaps this was done when 
the dam was dug up to install the present corrugated pipe 
carrying water from the pond through the mill. Mr. Perham 
had to chain up the north end of one timber, build a wood 
support structure, and remove the pier. 

The turbine, which had been buried in about three feet 
of gravel, was excavated by hand. The turbine shaft to the 
gear was unbolted, the rotor moved to one side, and the 
"floor" with its iron insert was lifted up and away. This 
floor, made of 3" planks, had been supported on two 8" x 8" x 
5' timbers which in turn rested on four 8" x 8" x 1' posts. 
All wood parts had been fastened together with long 3/4" iron 
rods, threaded on both ends. Although the iron rotor and 
turbine base are somewhat rusted they appear to be useable, 
but considerable construction will be needed to create a 
working turbine; especially the metal "scroll" which directs 
water to the rotor vanes . 

At the back of the mill the tailrace was worked on, the 
main chore being the hand removal of 70 odd years of mud and 
gravel and piling it along the sides. At the same time, 
rocks which had fallen into the tailrace were put back on the 

71 



west wall. This partial rebuilding of the west wall led to 
re-routing the outfall entry into the tailrace near the mill 
to a point further away. This was done because when the 
turbine operates, a lot of water pours through it and must 
run freely, with no obstruction to create back pressure. The 
east wall of the tailrace was in better condition, but some 
overburden was removed so that it can be built level with the 
west wall. 

The front yard suffered a deep hole and a large pile of 
dirt. This excavation was an attempt to locate the original 
sluice walls and other evidence of early construction. The 
west sluice wall was in place, but the curved east wall was 
not. Old timer ing was discovered, probably part of an early 
sluiceway or penstock. The leak (which from the beginning 
has been of concern) appears to be following the west wall of 
the old sluice. 

The upper part of the stone foundation under the sill 
at the front of the mill had been well built, including an 
arch; but below this was a jumble of big rocks and gravel. 
Mr. Perham and helper pulled these big rocks out from under 
the mill and used them as the base of the new curved east 
sluiceway wall. More big rocks were trucked in, and placed 
on the wall by hand. Just a few more big ones are needed to 
complete the job. One section of the corrugated pipe was 
removed. Next in this portion of the project will be 
construction of a bulkhead, water impoundment box, penstock 
and controls. 

We are proud that the Medfield Telephone Directory 
committee chose the Kingsbury Pond and grist mill to grace 
the cover of their new directory. 

The Committee extends its thanks to students and others 
who donated time and hard work this summer; especially Joseph 
Comeau who came almost every Saturday and demonstrated how 
much can be accomplished with a hand shovel; Armand Janjigian 
who brought his backhoe to do some serious dirt and stone 
moving, assisted by Jack Copeland; and to the Medfield Public 
Works Department for its continued support. 



Progress is slow, 
but progress there is, 
be. 



and unfortunately not very visible, 
and progress there will continue to 



Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Nyren, Chairman 

Michael Sullivan, Treasurer 

Barbara Leighton, Secretary 

Michael Cronin 

Donald MacDonald 

Richard Ostrander 

Paul Simpson 

Thompson Lingel, Associate Member 



72 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In 1992, Metropolitan Area Planning Council kicked-off 
a joint services initiative designed to educate and inform 
member communities on new and cost effective ways of doing 
business. Municipal information network systems, service 
sharing, cooperative purchasing and regional dispatch 
opportunities were explored. 

MetroPlan 2000 1992 activities included the Council's 
formal adoption of the housing, land resources, and 
transportation elements of the plan; development of a Capital 
Investment Program (CIP) to examine priorities for public 
infrastructure investments in the region; and initiation of 
the Concentrated Development Center (CDC) nomination process. 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council also began an 
Overall Economic Development Program (OEDP) in 1992 that is 
expected to result in substantial new investments in the 
metropolitan region from the Economic Development 
Administration as well as other federal and state sources. 

Staff support to the Three Rivers Interlocal Council 
(TRIC) subregion, of which Medfield is a member, continued 
last year as well. MAPC staff facilitated TRIC's review of 
the Dedham Common Mall proposal; participated in the 
subcommittee formed to make recommendations to the Dedham 
Planning Board on the mall site; and facilitated TRIC's 
review and comment on MetroPlan 2 000 's CIP, the Strategic 
Metropolitan Transportation System, and the Fowl Meadow and 
Ponkapoag Bog Area of Critical Environmental Concern. 

Presentations on the 12 8 buildout and land use analysis 
were made to the TRIC subregion and TRIC served as the 
corridor advisory committee to the Route 1 South Corridor 
Planning Study. 

Last year's Data Center services to communities 
included development and distribution of Community Employment 
Forecasts used in long range highway, transit, water, and 
sewer planning; sponsorship of the Boston Area Census User's 
Conference featuring workshops on census data applications, 
reviews of major demographic patterns, and information on how 
to use new 1990 census information; development of the 
community profiles, a two-page summary of the first release 
of the 1990 census information; and analysis of the Fiscal 
1993 State Budget to help inform communities of the 
differences between the Governor's, Senate and House program 
appropriations . 

MAPC's 1992 transportation planning efforts included 
development and distribution of the regional Transportation 
Improvement Program for the Fiscal Years 1993-1995. The 
document was distributed to all member communities and to 
ensure local input into the process, MAPC sponsored two 

73 



information sessions on the TIP in July and again in 
December. Because the Intermodal Surface Transportation 
Efficiency Act of 1991 requires a reclassification of 
roadways, in 1992 MAPC also provided member communities with 
maps of proposed functional classifications. All communities 
were offered an opportunity to comment. 

MAPC's technical assistance on the new National 
Affordable Housing Act included preparation of local 
Comprehensive Housing Af fordability Strategies (CHAS) , the 
HOME program, and consortia formation. On behalf of its 
communities, Metropolitan Area Planning Council also 
participated in EOCD's Housing Policy Commission; supported 
the Housing Bond Bill; and sought a state CHAS consistent 
with MetroPlan 2000 and beneficial to MAPC communities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

David C. Soule 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 




Assistant Town Clerk Dorcas Owen 



74 



MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and the Residents of Medfield: 

1992 saw continued growth in the use of the Medfield Public 
Library. Over 112,000 books and other materials were 
borrowed this year, which is a 10% increase over 1991 and a 
35% increase in circulation since 1988. 

1992 was also a year in which expanded use of technology 
brought greater opportunity for citizens in Medfield to 
obtain needed information. A CD-ROM workstation purchased 
with state aid funds, was installed in the reference room. 
It provides subject access to articles in The New York Times 
and the ability to print desired articles. A multi-media 
encyclopedia is also available on CD-ROM which presents 
visual images on the computer screen along with sound and 
printed text. The ease of locating information is greatly 
enhanced on these CD-ROM products by the ability to use key 
word searching. 

The use of electronic access to information also was expanded 
this year to cover articles in periodicals. A periodical 
database which indexes over 1,000 business, technical, 
scientific, medical, and general periodicals can now be 
searched on the Minuteman Library Network terminals in our 
library. Copies of articles in magazines not subscribed to 
locally can be obtained via fax in a matter of days. The 
public has found this expanded service extremely useful. 

3,745 new materials were added to our collection this year 
from the over 50,000 items that were published in the United 
States. Business and investment reference resources were 
expanded to meet heavy demands for information in this area, 
as were non-print materials, most specifically books-on-tape 
and non-fiction videotapes. 

A significant staffing change took place this year with the 
resignation of longtime children's librarian, Connie Jones. 
A special search advisory committee, formed to assist in the 
search process, was pleased to recommend Catherine Shier for 
the position after a four month search. Ms. Shier brings a 
strong background in library science and children's 
literature to the position and has demonstrated a high level 
of competence and enthusiasm during her first three months on 
the job. It has become increasingly evident that there is a 
need to make this position full-time as circulation of 
children's materials has dramatically increased and the 
desire for additional children's programs is continually- 
expressed. 

A significant amount of time was devoted to long range 
planning during the year which culminated in a random sample 
telephone survey of over 3 00 households to determine 
strengths and weaknesses of the Medfield Public Library 
relative to the needs of town citizens. Survey results 
revealed there is a need to expand the collection of 

75 



materials, particularly non-fiction books and reference 
materials in the adult department and almost all areas of the 
children's collection. Residents also feel the library 
should continue to expand technology to provide greater 
access to information and resources outside the local library 
and the hours of service should be expanded for more 
convenient use of the library. A formal Long Range Plan for 
library development is being written to guide future 
decisions. 

Strong community support for the Medfield Public Library was 
demonstrated by the town meeting vote to add funding to the 
library budget to permit resumption of Wednesday hours of 
service which had been cut the previous fiscal year. In 
addition, there was significant growth in monetary 
contributions made to the Friends of the Library, in 
donations made by many community organizations and local 
businesses and by volunteers who donated time to keep the 
library shelves in order. 

Special recognition needs to be given to the Friends of the 
Library and the Board of Library Trustees for their deep 
commitment to improving library services in Medfield. Their 
efforts throughout the year have meant a great deal to me 
personally, and my sincere thanks is extended to them. 

As we look to 1993 and beyond, there is widespread 
recognition that libraries in general will assume a central 
role in providing information services in the Information 
Age. In the not too distant future, it will be possible to 
access the "world of information" from the local library on 
the electronic/telecommunications infrastructure that is 
being established. The Medfield Public Library has laid the 
groundwork and is poised to assume this central role in our 
community. 

In closing, I would like to thank the library staff for 
continuing to provide a high level of service to all who use 
the library. Their commitment to customer service shines on 
a daily basis. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Jane B. Archer 
Library Director 



ANNUAL LIBRARY STATISTICS 

New Acquisitions 3,745 Total Materials Owned 36,121 
Active Card Holders 6,739 Total Circulation 112.173 



76 



TRUSTEES OF THE MEMORIAL PUBLIC LIBRARY 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Trustees of the Memorial Public Library are pleased 
to present our Annual Report for the 1992 year. Despite 
fiscal constraints which continue to challenge the trustees, 
director and library personnel, we have had a rewarding year. 

The library trustees wish to thank the Friends of the 
Library for their financial contributions and continued 
support. Our community is indeed fortunate to have this 
strong and supportive group assisting our library. 

The trustees also wish to acknowledge the contributions 
of the local business community, and the many volunteers who 
have helped us in providing a better library for the citizens 
of Medfield. 

Throughout 1992, the Trustees were mindful of the 
financial responsibilities with which they were charged. We 
were also mindful of our duty as trustees to present to the 
leadership of the Town our needs, seeking an appropriate 
balance between these needs and the resources available. 

With the help of the citizens, the Friends of the 
Library and others, we were successful in presenting to the 
town a particular need of the library to restore town funding 
to keep the library open on Wednesdays. Also, limited 
additional funding was provided for book and material 
purchases. We are most grateful to the citizens of Medfield 
for their help in assisting the trustees in achieving these 
important goals. We sincerely believe the citizens have 
benefited from the additional funds the library received at 
Town Meeting and that we all more fully understand the fiscal 
picture of the library. 

The year also saw a major long range planning effort 
undertaken to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the 
library relative to the needs of its citizens. One aspect of 
this planning effort was a formal survey developed by members 
of the Library Long Range Planning Committee, a group of 
volunteers who dedicated much time to this task. The results 
of the survey are being analyzed now by the trustees and will 
be an important part of the formulation of the Long Range 
Plan. We are most grateful to the Long Range Planning 
Committee for their hard work and dedication and for their 
report. 

Fiscal 1992 was a year of continued growth in the use 
of the library. Over 112,000 books and other materials were 
borrowed during this year. State and other funding sources 
provided expanded use of technology to Medfield. Our first 
CD-ROM was installed, providing quick indexed access to the 
New York Times and a multimedia Groliers Encyclopedia: 
superior learning and research tools for both old and young 
alike. We encourage the citizens to come see and use these 
applications of technology that help to make lifelong 
learning easy, efficient and fun. 

77 



In May of 1992 Connie Jones, our long time Children's 
Librarian, resigned. Connie's excellent service to the 
community, and most notably to the children, will always be 
valued. 

A volunteer Advisory Search Committee was formed to 
assist the director in the search for a new Children's 
Librarian. After an extensive search process, the committee 
recommended Catherine Shier for the position. Ms. Shier 
brings both a Library Science and Children's Literature 
degree to the position, along with a love of children and 
books. The Trustees are confident that Ms. Shier will serve 
the community in a manner consistent with that provided by 
the current staff. 

A library is a most important cultural, educational and 
recreational center for our town. The books, materials, 
programs and personnel make it a unique place in our 
community. For those who use it often, we thank you for your 
support. For those who have not visited us in the recent 
past, we invite you to "try us out." Your public library has 
a great deal to offer. 

To the library staff, the trustees thank you for your 
fine service to the community. You make our library a very 
special place. 

The trustees welcome any questions from the community 
or suggestions for improvements in the services we provide. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Michael West, Chairman 
Elizabeth Kozel, Vice Chairman 
David Allan, Treasurer 
Maura McNicholas, Secretary 
James Baughman 
Richard Fitzpatrick 



78 



MEMORIAL DAY ADDRESS 



May 25, 1992 

Given by Eric J. Doucette 
Petty Officer 2nd Class, 
U. S. Coast Guard Reserve 

It is my distinct pleasure to be with you today to 
honor those Americans who have protected our freedom and 
provided peace for our nation. 

My goal is to impress upon the youth of the community 
the significance of this day. My experience in the Persian 
Gulf was marked by three distinct events with Medfield 's 
youth. Before deployment overseas I spoke with a high school 
class; during my tour I was adopted by Mrs. Gross's sixth 
grade class; and upon my return to Medfield I was honored to 
spend a day with Ms. Moran's kindergartners at their 
graduation. Due to my bond with the youth of Medfield and 
the fact that I am a youth of this town, I would like to 
deliver my message to them. Memorial Day exists because we 
need to be aware of the high price of freedom that has been 
paid for by the sacrifices and precious blood of our 
countrymen . 

The Americans we honor today are remembered by their 
loved ones as family members, relatives, neighbors and 
friends. To the veteran they are "our brothers in arms," 
asked in a time of need to serve our country, to restore 
peace, and to insure freedom for generations yet to come. 
These fallen veterans lie in peace along the gentle green 
slopes of Arlington, and in hundreds of cemeteries across the 
nation and around the world. 

Again and again, every generation of Americans has been 
taxed at different times, places, and for different reasons. 
Most of these places in which our countrymen fought were 
unknown to us prior to the bloodshed of an American on 
foreign soil. They have insured our great nation's freedom 
like no others from Concord and Lexington, to the patriots 
that met superior numbers of well trained British regulars 
and the brave courageous few who stood their ground at the 
Alamo; from the gallant men in blue and grey, to the "Rough 
Riders" charging up San Juan Hill through a hail of enemy 
gunfire; thousands of young doughboys fighting in France and 
countless acts of courage and sacrifice by soldiers, sailors, 
marines, and airmen in World War I and II; from the bitter 
cold and multitude of enemy troops faced by our soldiers in 
Korea to the pitched night battles and fire fights in the 
jungles of Vietnam; combat parachute jumps and lightening 
assaults made in Grenada and Panama... and finally, a 
magnificent deployment, campaign and victory in the Middle 
East, never to be forgotten and carved into history forever. 



79 



Within the midst of the crowd gathered here today, our 
youth should take note because possibly your coach, teacher, 
friend, or maybe even your father has served. Those who 
served in Desert Storm became a new generation of citizens 
who protected the freedoms we enjoy today. Look around you. 
Among the crowd is the generation of World War I and II who 
served this nation, the millions across the globe and at home 
and those who remember them. In this crowd are those who 
served in Korea, referred to as the forgotten war, but the 
Korean people remember. Because of you, communist domination 
was stopped at the 38th parallel. Only now has our nation 
opened its eyes and pledged to construct a memorial for those 
who gave the ultimate sacrifice in that War. 

In the wake of Desert Storm, our generation experienced 
a renewed sense of patriotism. Every generation has 
experienced this during national and world crisis and in this 
way our nation citizen's have been involved although not on 
the front lines. However, one generation served like no 
other. Never before has a generation of Americans ever 
served with so much courage, honor and self-sacrifice as our 
Vietnam Veterans. During that entire long war, we asked our 
soldiers to fight on and on without the support and respect 
that they deserved. To all of you Vietnam Veterans: You 
carried on when others at home failed you. The American 
people owe you a giant apology and great deal of gratitude. 
More than any other group of veterans that has been asked to 
serve, you deserve special recognition. When I marched in 
the victory parade in New York and Washington D.C., my 
thoughts were of you. You deserved that honor then, not a 
decade later. 

We should remember to salute all the veterans that 
served between conflicts. They were always ready in 
protecting the home front, answered the call in Lebanon, 
Libya, Iran, Grenada and Panama. 

Beyond the honor for yesterday's heroes, there is the 
challenge of tomorrow. As we look back with pride and 
patriotism, we must also look forward and prepare for the 
future. The challenges of the future won't be any easier 
than they were in the past. The demands of those who will 
stand up to defend the nation will still be difficult and the 
sacrifices will still be great. There is no other way if we 
are to remain blessed with liberty and freedom. 

The decades to come may not be marked by armed 
conflict, but of challenges more complex and diverse. The 
homeless, global warming, AIDS, the war on drugs and the list 
goes on. . . The generation of the nineties and those to come 
will be called upon to serve our nation and to resolve these 
conflicts. The values of self sacrifice are inherent to a 
soldier in time of war and should be equally so for all of us 
in time of peace. 



80 



Youth of Medfield, you are challenged to provide our 
nation with a cadre of citizens that will serve our nation in 
time of need. Our veterans have insured your freedom. Do 
what you must to maintain the precious vigil over our 
nation's freedom. The baton is now passed to you to insure 
another generation's freedom. 




Petty Officer 2nd Class Eric J. Doucette delivering 

the Memorial Day address. 

(Photo courtesy of Medfield Suburban Press) 



81 



COMMITTEE TO STUDY MEMORIALS 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Committee to Study Memorials is pleased to submit 
its fourth Annual Report. The Committee to Study Memorials 
was successful in naming the three streets in the new 
Allendale Development off Dale Street after Thomas Clewes, 
John Crowder, and Joseph Pace; naming Boyden Road after 
Jabez Boyden, in the Woodcliff Estates off Pederzini Drive; 
and naming a street in the Kettle Pond Estates off Plain 
Street after Samuel Cole. Thomas Clewes, John Crowder, and 
Joseph Pace gave their lives for their country in World War 
II and Jabez Boyden and Samuel Cole died * for their new 
country in the Revolutionary War. With these five streets, 
the Committee to Study Memorials continues to march toward 
its goal of having a street, square, or park named after all 
from Medfield who died in our nation's wars. Of the 
thirty-three Medfield boys who gave their lives from the 
Revolutionary War to Vietnam, eighteen have now been so 
memorialized. 

During Memorial Day, the three Honor Squares in the 
town center were rededicated with ceremonies taking place 
during the Memorial Day Parade. The following information 
plaques were placed beneath the Honor Square signs: 

JOHN PARCELL ROSS. JR. - 1925-1945: John P. Ross, Jr. was 
born in Yonkers, N.Y. and came to Medfield with his family in 
1939. John graduated as an honor student from Medfield High 
School with the class of 1943. The following month he 
enlisted in the US Coast Guard, where he attained the rank of 
Signalman 3rd Class. While serving in this capacity, during 
the invasion of Okinawa, his landing craft was attacked by a 
Japanese kamikaze. John sustained wounds from which he died 
June 4, 1945 at the age of 19. He was buried in the First 
Marine Division Cemetery on the Island of Okinawa and a 
Service of Remembrance was later held in his honor from the 
Second Congregational Church, Medfield, on August 19, 1945. 
His remains were transferred from the Military Cemetery on 
Okinawa to the Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale, 
New York on February 15, 1949. 

CLARENCE MEREDITH CUTLER - 1891-1921: Clarence Cutler 
graduated valedictorian from Medfield High School with the 
class of 1910. He enlisted in the Air Corps as soon as the 
United States entered World War I, and was assigned the 
perilous task of training other pilots. Lieutenant Cutler 
stayed in the service after the war was over. In January of 
1921 while flying over Irlich, Germany, he was killed 
instantly when his DeHaviland 4-B aircraft fell 400 feet and 
crashed near the Rhine River. Lieutenant Cutler, called "one 
of the best flyers in the Air Service," had flown over 3,000 
hours and had trained many of the flyers who served on the 
Western Front. Funeral services with full military honors 
were held in Chenery Hall (Town Hall) and his flag draped 
casket, bourne on a caisson was escorted to Vine Lake 

82 



Cemetery. 

VINCENZO "VINCENT" PAUL BRAVO - 1919-1943; Vincent Bravo 
grew up on Spring Street, not far from this square. "Zeke," 
as his friends called him, attended the Medfield Public 
Schools. He graduated from Medfield High School with the 
class of 1937. After Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Army 
Air Corps. In the 455th A.A.F. Bomb Squad, he became a 
flight engineer on a B26 bomber. On June 3, 1943, on route 
from Iceland to a combat mission over Europe, his plane 
crashed during bad weather into a mountain in Northern 
Scotland. All five crew members on board were killed. 
Buried first in England, Staff Sergeant Bravo 's body was 
returned home after the war and buried with full military 
honors from St. Edward's Church. His body was brought on a 
caisson to Vine Lake Cemetery. This same caisson was used to 
carry the body of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 

The Committee to Study Memorials voted to recommend the 
naming of the gazebo in the center of town after native son 
Lowell Mason, whereas 1992 was the bicentennial of his birth. 
Lowell Mason is nationally known as the "Father of Music in 
the Public Schools" and we thought the naming most 
appropriate. The Board of Selectmen rejected our 
recommendation and instead named the gazebo in honor of "all 
town citizens." 

During Memorial Day Ceremonies at Vine Lake Cemetery, 
the road in the cemetery from the flag pole towards Bridge 
Street was officially dedicated "JOSEPH ROBERTS AVENUE" in 
memory of Joseph Roberts, Cemetery Commissioner from 
1945-1980 and Selectman from 1954-1963. The sign bearing his 
name was unveiled by family members. Speaking on behalf of 
the Roberts family was son-in-law Tracy Mitchell. 

The Committee to Study Memorials wishes to thank the 
Medfield Highway Department for their support and labor in 
putting up the memorial signs and plaques, and a special note 
of thanks to Frank Iafolla of Abel Signs for the donation of 
his time and labor on the new "CLARENCE CUTLER SQUARE" sign. 
This is not the first time Frank has donated his services to 
the Committee to Study Memorials, and to the town. We are 
most grateful. 

We wish to thank the Selectmen and the Planning Board 
for their support as well as the many residents and Town 
Boards and Committees who helped our committee. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard P. DeSorgher 
Paul F. Curran 
Robert A. Kinsman 
David F. Temple 
Patricia I. Walsh 



83 



NORFOLK COUNTY MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Operational Project Program integrates all proven 
technologies into a system of mosquito control that is 
rational, safe, effective, and economically feasible. 

All mosquito eggs need water to hatch to sustain larval 
growth . 

SOURCE REDUCTION WORK: 

Our primary efforts are concentrated on the drainage of 
shallow, standing, stagnant water, and the maintenance of 
existing flow systems which contribute to mosquito breeding 
sources. 

Drainage Ditches Cleaned 3,327 feet 

Brush Obstructing Ditches Cut 3,010 feet 

Drainage reconstruction by wide-track backhoe 3,830 feet 

LARVICIDING: 

Treatment of mosquito larvae during aquatic development 
is the next most effective control effort. 

Larvicide by backpack/briquets/mistblowers 136 acres 
Catch basin larvicide application 506 count 

ADULTICIDING: 

The suppression of flying adult mosquitoes becomes 
necessary when they are numerous, annoying, or threatening to 
residents. 

Adulticide U.L.V. from trucks 998 acres 

Surveys, inspections and monitoring in support of our 
program include locating and mapping breeding areas, larval 
and adult collections, and field work evaluations leading to 
better drainage. 

The Project received 39 calls from residents for 
information and assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John J. Smith, Superintendent 



84 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

1992 was anything but dull for the Medfield Park and 
Recreation Commission. As many of you know and for those who 
don't: the Commission is a five person elected board of 
volunteers. We are charged with the responsibility of 
managing six town properties. The properties are Baker's 
Pond, Baxter Park, Hinkley Swim Pond, Metacomet Park and 
Fields, Pfaff Community Center and 56 Acres. Our management 
of these properties includes, but is not limited to, setting 
policies, running programs, park and field maintenance, 
building maintenance, staffing, land development and future 
planning. 

It has been the goal of the Commission to develop a 
park department in order to administer our policy making 
decisions and to handle day to day issues and events. This 
year we began to realize our goal with the hiring of Wayne 
Currie as a part time Park and Recreation Administrator. His 
19 hours are spent carrying out the policies set by the 
Commission, overseeing all the above named properties and 
activity programs, running the 1/2 day trips and special 
events, in addition to organizing the Hinkley Pond Summer 
Concert, a concert at Baker's Pond, a Halloween window 
painting contest, the annual Halloween Party, and publishing 
the brochure. 

The activity program runs under the direction of 
part-time class coordinator, Jean Todesca. The class 
coordinator's responsibilities include, but are not limited 
to, coordination of three sessions of classes, compilation 
and layout of the class portion of the brochure, and class 
development and evaluation. For the seventh year the 
activity classes were heavily attended. 

Our plans for dredging Baker's Pond are underway. We 
have begun the process by sampling the soil at the bottom of 
the pond. This step is necessary to avoid liability for 
wrongful disposal of contaminated soil. The project should 
be completed by Fall '93. 

Baxter Park's flagpole needs to be painted. The plans 
are to have the flagpole painted this Spring. The future 
plans for the park include a brick walkway, benches and 
landscaping. 

Memberships to Hinkley Pond continue to grow. The 
improvements at the Pond were noticed by all who attended. 
They included renovation of the guardhouse, replacement of a 
lifeguard chair, grading of all of the pond which we believe 
contributed to the excellent water quality all summer, and 
landscaping. A dumpster donated by Marragio Rubbish Removal 
Company was much appreciated. The swim pond staff under the 
direction of Jean Todesca had a good season, as did the Swim 
Team under the direction of Stephen Russo and Robert Wallace. 



85 



The parents of the swim team, as always, gave their strong 
support. Once again, FUN DAY was a success. More than 3 00 
hot dog dinners were served by the Commissioners while the 
pond staff kept everyone busy with games and activities. 
This summer the Dixie Land Cavaliers performed at the pond 
and were well received. 

The Metacomet Park was completed this year with the 
purchase of three additional pieces of equipment. They will 
be installed Spring '93. Dick Waterfall returned as the 
Tennis Director. The tennis program included 3 sessions of 
adult lessons and a junior program. Due to the demand, plans 
are underway to expand both programs. Estimates were 
obtained for seal-coating the tennis courts. An advisory 
committee of frequent court users was formed to act as 
liaison to the commission. They will assist the Commission 
in investigating what is needed to maintain the courts, 
policies regarding court use and the tennis program, as well 
as fund-raising. This year the fields at Metacomet were 
maintained by the Park and Recreation Commission with the 
users of the fields contributing to their upkeep. This we 
believe was cost effective and ensured all land was 
maintained. 

The Pfaff Community Center continues to need major 
renovation. The immediate structural improvement planned is 
replacement of the roof. Our annual Christmas Mini-Mall held 
at the Pfaff was a huge success. Over 2 local artisans 
displayed their wares, while the caterer, Mary Richman, 
offered lunch to all the hungry shoppers. Monies made at 
this event will be used in offsetting operating costs at the 
Pfaff. 

Major field maintenance was undertaken at 56 Acres. 
The two infields needed a lot of attention and the cost was 
divided among Mothball, Men's Softball and Park and 
Recreation. We hope to continue to upgrade these fields. 
Little League is proposing development of four Little League 
fields and in conjunction with their proposal, Park and 
Recreation is forming a committee to consider long range 
plans for 56 Acres. 

Creative Camp was held this summer under the 
co-direction of Jody Bowers and Jean Kingsbury. Each session 
was filled to capacity and plans for expanding camp are 
underway. 

There were two sponsored ski trips this year, with 
plans to offer ski lessons in early '93. 

In Spring of 1992, John Monahan and Gary Walsh resigned 
from the Commission. Their positions were filled by Eric 
O'Brien and David Armstrong. We also experienced a change in 
personnel when Marge Monahan resigned as the Activity Class 
Coordinator and Camp Director. We are thankful for her 
contributions over the past five years. 



86 



The Park and Recreation Commission continues to expand 
programs, properties and recreational opportunities to answer 
the needs of our growing town. It is our position that this 
cannot be accomplished without, at the very least, a full 
time administrator and the endless efforts of our volunteers. 
We thank you for your continued support. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Kathryn Violick-Boole, Chairman 
Margaret Maider, Treasurer 
Geralyn Warren, Secretary 
David Armstrong, Commissioner 
Eric O'Brien, Commissioner 
Sherry Savilonis, Associate 




Medfield Garden Club continues to beautify our 
Town Common. 



87 



PLANNING BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

During 1992 the Planning Board approved one new 
subdivision plan: a definitive subdivision plan for 
Woodcliff Estates - Phase 2 (one street, 13 lots) off Flint 
Locke Lane. 

Thirty six lots were released for building from three 
previously approved subdivisions. 

The Board endorsed eight "approval-not-required" plans, 
creating 25 new lots along existing streets. 

No site plans were submitted to the Board. 

TOWN MEETING ACTIONS 

The Board placed four (4) articles on the Town Meeting 
Warrant, all of which the Town Meeting voted to adopt. 
Articles passed at Town Meeting and approved by the Attorney 
General include: 

— extending the Aquifer Protection District, Zone 1 
(Well Protection Zone) to include the land around 
Well #6, a planned new town well near the Charles 
River, just north of route 27. 

— -modifying the Zoning Bylaw to give businesses more 
flexibility in placement of temporary window signs 
without increasing the total sign area allowed. 

--changing the Zoning Bylaw to exempt "Open Space 
Residential" special permits from the standards 
generally applied, and making them subject only to 
the 18 specific requirements for Open Space 
Residential Zoning set out in Section 7 of the 
Bylaw. 

— setting regulations governing day care facilities 
with regard to area, dimension, buffer and 
driveway regulations. 

The Town Meeting voted to accept the extension of 
Lakewood Terrace, Sewall Court and Tannery Drive as public 
ways . 

PLANNING BOARD APPOINTMENTS 

The Board reappointed two members to the Long Range 
Planning Committee: Jeffrey Masters and Martha L. Smick for 
terms to expire June 28, 1995. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING COMMITTEE 

The Board continued to provide professional consulting 
assistance to the Long Range Planning Committee in their 
mission to carry out a new planning process focusing on the 
long range use of un- and underdeveloped land in the Town. 

88 



The Committee sponsored two very successful workshops in 
1992. The first workshop afforded town boards and committees 
the opportunity to come together and share their expertise 
and dreams regarding future planning for the Town. The 
second workshop grew out of the first with the various groups 
providing a day long informative session for the general 
public. 

We thank the Long Range Planning Committee for their 
dedication and hard work and encourage them to continue in 
their pursuit of good planning guidelines for the Town. 

SIGN ADVISORY BOARD 

During 1992 the Sign Advisory Board continued to review 
applications for sign permits, to advise and assist sign 
applicants, and to recommend modifications of the Sign Bylaw. 

OTHER BUSINESS 

The Board continues to review the Subdivision Rules and 
Regulations, with an eye toward improving development 
requirements in the Town. 

Board members served on the Open Space Planning 
Committee, the Affordable Housing Committee and the Capital 
Budget Committee. 

The Board continued to use the engineering services of 
Whitman & Howard for subdivision review and street 
construction inspections. 

The Planning Board acknowledges with thanks the 
cooperation and assistance of other Town Boards and 
Departments, with special thanks to retired Town Counsel 
Charles Fuller, Jr., new Town Counsel Peter Michelson, 
Superintendent of Public Works Kenneth Feeney, and Tree 
Warden Edward Hinkley. 

Planning Board meetings are held weekly on Mondays at 8 
P.M. at the Town House and are open to the public. 
Appointments with the Board must be made by the Thursday noon 
prior to the meeting. Requests for information or 
appointments should be directed to the Planning Board 
Administrator, Norma Matczak, at the Town House. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Daniel W. Nye, Chairman 

John K. Gagliani, Vice Chairman 

Mark G. Cerel, Secretary 

Margaret E. Bancroft 

Paul B. Rhuda 

MEDFIELD PLANNING BOARD 



89 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The Medfield Recycling Committee, appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen, is charged with assisting in the 
implementation of recycling in Medfield and educating the 
public about Medfield' s recycling program. In 1992, the 
Recycling Committee carried out its charge by urging approval 
of enforceable mandatory recycling rules, continuing its 
public education efforts, instituting plastics and button 
cell recycling programs and maintaining involvement with the 
regional recycling consortium. 

Recycling Participation and Savings 

Medfield residents again increased substantially their 
recycling efforts during 1992, based on information supplied 
by the Department of Public Works. The cost savings from 
recycling are significant, as indicated below: 



19 9 2 











(estimated) 






Percentage 




Incineration & 


Lecyclable 


Tons 


Change 


Revenue 


Transportation 


Material 


Recvcled 


From 1991 


Generated 


Costs Saved 


Paper 


618.78 


+48% 


$ -0- 


$ 41,656.27 


Glass 


110.45 


+ 8% 


-0- 


8,208.64 


"White" 










Metals 


252 


-15% 


-0- 


-0- 


Metal Cans 


19.33 


+82% 


-0- 


1,513.93 


#2 Plastics 


7.97 


N/A 


-0- 


-0- 


Deposit 










Containers 


.72 


+18% 


1,994.45* 


-0- 


Leaves 


325 (est 


. )** 0% 


-0- 


25,454.00 


TOTALS 


1334.25 


+ 16% 


$ 1,994.45 


$ 76,832.84 



* Deposit container revenues for 1992 were allocated equally 
among the following accounts: Household Hazardous Waste 
Collection Day, Grist Mill Renovation and Town Common Gazebo. 

** This figure represents approximately (?) of Medfield 's 
total waste stream, an amount greater than the latest 
national recycling rate (for 1990) of 17%. 

Mandatory Recycling Enforcement 

The Recycling Committee believes that Medfield' s 
mandatory recycling rules will increase the town's cost 
savings from recycling by encouraging greater citizen 
participation. Those rules also dovetail with state waste 
disposal bans covering yard wastes, white metals and 
aluminum, metal and glass containers (already in effect) and 
plastics and paper (effective 12/31/94) . 



90 



At the 1992 Town Meeting, the Recycling Committee 
proposed an enforcement mechanism for the 1991 regulations 
mandating recycling. The proposal, which provided for a fine 
of $2 5 per mandatory recycling violation, was supported by 
the Board of Selectmen and the Warrant Committee and was 
approved by an overwhelming majority of the voters at Town 
Meeting. The fine became effective on July 1, 1992. 

Public Education Efforts 

The Recycling Committee's public education activities 
continued during 1992. These efforts covered all aspects of 
Medfield' s recycling program, including #2 plastic bottles, 
for which recycling began on July 1, 1992. 

1. Medfield Recycling Guide. In September, the 
Committee published an updated "Medfield Recycling Guide," a 
one page flier which outlines in detail the town's recycling 
rules. The revised flier also includes information on 
household hazardous wastes on the back side. The new flier 
was distributed at Medfield Day and by volunteers at the 
Transfer Station. Copies are available from the Public Works 
Department. A mailing to all households is planned for early 
1993. 

2. Medfield Day Booth. The Recycling Committee 
sponsored a booth at Medfield Day 1992. The booth featured 
educational displays illustrating the DOs and DON'Ts of 
recycling in Medfield and identifying organizations that 
accept usable discards. 

3. Transfer Station Volunteers. During 1992, the 
Recycling Committee held two training sessions for its new 
volunteer program. Over 25 volunteers have worked regularly 
at the Transfer Station recycling area educating others about 
the town's recycling program and assisting in removing 
contaminants from the collected recyclables. The Committee 
greatly appreciates the work and input of its dedicated 
volunteers and hopes to welcome new volunteers in 1993. 

4 . Other Education and Outreach. The Recycling 
Committee also heightened residents' awareness of recycling 
issues in the following ways: 

* The Committee designed a new sign for the plastics 
bins in the Transfer Station recycling area and is working on 
signs for other recyclables. 

* The Committee and the Park and Recreation Commission 
sponsored Medfield Green-up Day in May 1992. The event 
increased public awareness of the town's recycling program 
and helped beautify a number of town properties. 

* The Committee reached out to residents through 
informational releases published in the local papers and a 20 
minute Cable 8 program aired repeatedly in the spring. 



91 



* The Committee encouraged recycling yard wastes 
through backyard composting or the use of the town's 
composting facility (for which Massachusetts Department of 
Environmental Protection approval was received in 1992) . 

New Recycling Programs. 

In addition to helping the town implement plastics 
recycling at the Transfer Station, the Recycling Committee 
started a recycling program for button cell batteries. With 
input from the Dover/ Sherborn/Medf ield committee on household 
hazardous wastes, the Recycling Committee established a 
number of year round button battery collection points and 
held two drop-and-swap paint days at the Transfer Station in 
May and September. These programs help keep hazardous 
materials out of the town's waste stream. 

Regional Recycling Proposals. 

During 1992, the Recycling Committee continued to 
participate in the Millis Recycling Consortium, a group of 20 
area towns with the goal of combining their recycling power 
in order to effectively market recyclable materials. A 
financial review committee chosen by the Board of Selectmen 
evaluated the implications of Medfield sending recyclables to 
a proposed regional facility versus remaining an independent 
marketer of its recyclables. The financial review committee 
recommended that Medfield remain an independent marketer. 
The Consortium abandoned its proposed regional materials 
recycling facility that would have been located in Holliston 
and is now considering three models - a recycling park, a 
recycling marketing cooperative and a materials recovery 
facility - to address the towns' recycling issues. 

Plans for the Future. 

Beyond continuing its work described above, the 
Recycling Committee plans to work more closely with the 
Medfield Public Schools in the future, focusing initially on 
food-related recycling issues. The Committee also plans to 
investigate creation of a swap area at the Transfer Station 
for books and other usable discards. 

The Recycling Committee appreciates the community's 
continuing support and welcomes your input and inquiries. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cynthia Greene, Chairperson 

Kenneth P. Feeney, Town Representative 

Barbara Donnelly 

Cheryl E. Dunlea 

Sandra Frigon 

Daniel M. O'Toole 

Erin S. Pastuszenski 

David Stephenson 

Annette M. Wells 



92 



TREE AND INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

This report is for the calendar year ending December 
31, 1992. 

With Federal Government funds collected this year for 
tree damage caused by Hurricane Bob in 1991, the tree 
department will plant 25 new trees around town. 

Meanwhile, the blizzard of December 11 and 12, 1992, 
with high winds and rain followed by 22 inches of snow, 
caused considerably more tree damage throughout the town than 
Hurricane Bob and the "no-name" storm of November 1991. 
Because of the extent of damage on both public and private 
property, the cleanup will continue well into 1993. 

The Gypsy moth continues to have a considerable 
presence in Medfield. The Fall Web Worm and Tent Caterpillar 
also created some visible damage throughout the town. 

The tree department uses a Ford F600 truck which will 
need to be replaced within the next few years. This will be 
a capital budget request by this department. 

Contract services were provided this year by McMillian 
Tree Services for use of a skywalker and by Davy Tree for 
stump removal. 

Residents are reminded that if they DO NOT wish 
spraying to be done on their property, prior notice must be 
given to the Town Clerk by registered mail no later than 
March 1. This notice must be given each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edward M. Hinkley 

TREE WARDEN 

DIRECTOR OF INSECT PEST CONTROL 



93 



TRI-COUNTY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

In July 1992 the School Committee reorganized and 

elected the following officers: William Vellante (Millis) 

Chairman, Janice Young (Walpole) Vice-chairman, and Charles 
Mucciarone (Franklin) Secretary. 

The School Committee conducts its regularly scheduled 
meetings on the first and third Wednesday of each month at 
8:00 P.M. in the Committee Meeting Room at the school. From 
the beginning of November until the end of January, the 
Budget Sub-Committee meets on the second and fourth 
Wednesdays specifically for the purpose of budget 
development. Other subcommittee meetings are scheduled as 
needed. 

GRADUATION 

On May 31, 1992, 159 students were graduated in an 
impressive afternoon ceremony. William Vellante, Chairman of 
the School Committee, delivered the welcome address to more 
than one thousand guests. Music was provided by the Millis 
High School band. 

Mary Fleming, Director of Pupil Personnel Services, 
presented scholarships and awards totaling more than $35,000 
to deserving senior students. Students receiving awards 
were: Yeasah Pell (Class Valedictorian) , Mark Bardol, 
Jennifer Derry, James Genoa, Matt Allard, Kara Shea, Heidi 
Decker, Rachelle Lallier, Tracey Carita and Keith Boyce of 
Franklin. Medfield students receiving awards were Robert 
Donovan and William Setter lund. Medway students receiving 
awards were Brian Long and Michael Bourbeau. Millis awardees 
were Brian Bourque (Class Salutorian) , Mark Pitts, Jeffrey 
Neal, Jeffrey DeRosa, Joseph McMorrow and Joseph Wallace. 
North Attleboro students receiving awards were Joann LaFleur, 
Joseph Lavalley, Amy Audette, Chris Thibert, Trinda Yurek, 
Brian Homsi and Mark Medeiros. Walpole students receiving 
awards were Brian Burt, Joanne Webber, Erik Schwarz and 
Gregory Ward. Also receiving awards at graduation were 
Nicole Rossilli of Seekonk and Todd Labagh from Norfolk. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

In September 1992 Tri-County welcomed approximately 735 
students to the new school year. Of that number, 16 were 
Medfield residents. 



94 



Because of the Cooperative Employment Program at 
Tri-County forty-two students started early employment in 
industry. By June of 1992, 95% of the graduating class was 
employed. 7 0% of the students were working in their 
vocational area. Approximately 3 0% of the class will attend 
colleges. Among the colleges they have enrolled in are: 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Northeastern 
University, Wentworth University, Johnson & Wales University, 
and Springfield College. Three Tri-County seniors were 
recognized by national organizations. Yeasah Pell of 
Franklin was one of six students nationally invited to 
compete in Electronics in Chicago by the International 
Vocational Clubs of America. Joseph Lavalley of North 
Attleboro received the Elks National Foundation Vocational 
Grant to continue his education in Machine Design, and Kara 
Shea of Franklin received a four-year tuition grant at the 
National Distributive Education Clubs of America Convention 
in California. 

Tri-County administered the PSAT's for the College 
Board. Additional achievement testing was administered for 
all Grade 9 students by the Guidance Department. Tri-County 
counselors, parents and students joined other area towns for 
a Higher Education Evening in Walpole with over 200 college 
co-op/ vocational counselors to work with them on job 
placement, co-op, and for college. 

The Pupil Personnel Department developed evening 
programs for 1991-92 centered around the theme of "Adjusting 
to School". The Guidance Department continued its Peer 
Helpers program to assist with school adjustment and to 
introduce Vocational Education to junior high students in the 
community. The department continued its programs for parents 
on Financial Aid, College Selection and Special Needs. 
Tri-County hosted Open Houses for Grade 9 students and their 
parents on November 24 and February 23 and continued to hold 
guided tours at the school on Tuesday for the public. 
Hundreds of parents took the opportunity to tour their 
vocational technical high school. 

In November 1992, Tri-County sponsored two Career Days 
for its member towns. This year Grade 8 students from the 
sending town had the opportunity to see and to hear career 
options centered on eighteen vocational and technical areas 
and to view the vocational technical component of the 
Medfield School System housed at Tri-County. 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

During the 1991-92 school year the teachers at 
Tri-County began work on a refocusing of our academic 
curriculum in order to make certain courses more applicable 
to our students' learning strengths. While we have always 
coordinated our vocational/technical programs with our 
academic programs, it is now necessary for us to expand this 
in order to ensure that necessary academic instruction is 
incorporated in vocational and technical courses. 



95 



It is also evident that more and more of our students 
are choosing to enter college directly after high school and 
we must therefore make sure that the academics are not merely 
limited to basic studies or directly related applications. 

While implementing an applied academic program we are 
still emphasizing thinking and reasoning skills as well as 
the study of those academic subjects necessary for further 
education. 

VOCATIONAL PROGRAMS 

Tri-County's vocational programs continue to provide 
numerous services to both individual and community members of 
the Tri-County School District. 

The Auto Shop is responsible for maintaining, repairing 
and servicing all of our school vehicles. We also provide 
services and repairs to the people who reside in Tri-County's 
district towns. The Auto Repair program has received ASE 
Master Certification from the National Automotive Technicians 
Education Foundation, Inc. (NATEF) . This certification is 
nationally recognized and considered to be the highest 
achievement known in the Automotive Industry. The Master 
Certification was awarded to the following areas of 
Automotive service: Automatic Transmission and Trans Axle, 
Brakes, Electrical Systems, Engine Performance, Engine 
Repair, Heating and Air Conditioning, Manual Drive Train and 
Axles and Suspension and Steering. 

Since the addition of Tri-County's new "Down Draft 
Spray Booth", our complete paint jobs have been rated as 
equal to that of any first Auto Body Repair Shop. Student 
placement rates remain high in this much needed profession. 

The Machine Shop curriculum is designed to meet the 
needs of industry. Industry is seeking students with 
vertical and horizontal milling machine experience. Industry 
is also desirous of hiring graduate students that have 
experience setting up and operating computer numerical 
control machines. Tri-County graduates have experienced 100% 
job placement over the past several years. 

The Metal Fabrication/ Industrial Technology program 
trains our graduates in all phases of welding and cutting. 
Students are able to be tested and receive Welding 
Certification that will help them to gain employment after 
completing school. Industrial Technology students are 
trained to do residential and commercial wiring and perform 
small engine repair. Industrial Technology trains some of 
our select students to become "Equipment Technicians" and to 
gain employment with Texas Instruments at its highest salary 
level. This successful program has been in operation for 
three years. 

The Plumbing program continues to provide students with 
the necessary skills and habits to become licensed 
journeymen. In the Plumbing Shop there are simulated house 
and apartment mock-ups where our future plumbers are trained 
in all aspects of the plumbing trade. 

96 



The simulated shop job activities and the correlated 
theory program within our Electrical program prepare our 
graduate students for the state journeymen examination. 

Both the Carpentry and Masonry shops prepare our 
student graduates for the construction trades. Many of our 
graduates are employed doing carpentry and masonry work in 
the building industry. Many of our Tri-County Alumni operate 
their own businesses. 

Our construction trade . programs are again in 1992 
working with the Town of Franklin to construct a low and 
moderate income housing unit. 

TECHNICAL PROGRAMS 

The new playground structure became a reality for the 
Tri-County Child Care program this past spring. With the 
start of a new school year the preschool children enrolled in 
the nursery school program are anxiously awaiting their turn 
to explore on this challenging, fun piece of equipment. 

The Commercial Art shop includes Desktop Publishing as 
part of their curriculum. Students learn computer layout, 
design, and graphics. 

Due to the increased demand for well-trained licensed 
cosmetologists, Tri-County has expanded its cosmetology 
program. With the addition of another certified cosmetology 
teacher and the opening of an ultramodern salon-shop area 
featuring the latest in equipment, the cosmetology program is 
now accepting more students. 

This expansion has allowed the restructuring of the 
cosmetology course so that one salon-shop area is used to 
introduce the program to 9th grade students and also provide 
basic education to 10th grade students who choose to major in 
the subject. The larger salon-clinic area offers sufficient 
space for the 11th and 12th grade students to work from 
individual stations when performing services. A separate 
clinic room has been created away from the main hair-care 
salon to offer private skin care treatments such as facials, 
waxing, and makeup. 

Culinary Arts has added a new computer to their 
program. The students are learning to operate and program 
the new point of purchase computer at Tri-County' s 
student-operated restaurant, Gerry's Place. Gerry's Place 
and Bake Shop are open to the public for lunch during the 
school year. 

The Electronics Technology program prepares students 
for entry level positions in the electronic and computer 
industry. The course includes instruction in basic AC/DC 
circuits, solid state technology and digital circuits. 
Consumer product service has recently been added to the 
Electronics curriculum. 



97 



Graphic Arts continues to provide its printing services 
to many nonprofit organizations throughout the Tri-County 
district while preparing students for entry level employment 
in the field. 

The students in the Marketing/Office Technology program 
have expanded their work processing skills by mastering 
computerized accounting, data based management, spread 
sheets, personal filing system, and Lotus 1-2-3. Students 
taking the marketing and banking track receive hands on 
training by working at the Dean Cooperative Bank located at 
Tri-County. The Bank is open to the public during the school 
year for all banking services. 

The Medical Careers program continues to grow as it 
enters its second full year. Students in all grades receive 
training in order to take the new state exam to become 
certified Nursing Assistants. We are currently affiliating 
with three area nursing homes where students can apply skills 
of patient care and recreational activity. Students also 
receive basic health care knowledge which enables them to 
pursue career choices such as EMT, Medical Assistant, and 
Nursing. 

ADULT EDUCATION 

The Adult Education Program has enrolled approximately 
700 students for the 1992-93 school year. Nursing Assistant, 
Introduction to Computers, Low Fat Cooking, and Baking & Cake 
Decorating have been added to the program due to increased 
interest by residents of the district. The Adult Education 
program of studies will continue to include Carpentry, 
Cosmetology, Electrical Code, Esthetics, HVAC&R, Introduction 
to CAD, Welding, and Woodworking. The Mandatory Code Review 
Course for licensed electricians will be held on selected 
Saturdays throughout the year. 

The Adult Education Division has expanded the 
cosmetology program by offering the opportunity for area 
residents to attend during the school day. A separate salon 
has been constructed to accommodate adult residents of the 
community for this 1000 hours of instruction. 

ATHLETICS 

The Fall season saw the soccer team make its first 
post-season play in many years, losing to Division II 
Rockland. Cross country and volleyball finished strong 
seasons with much to look forward to in 1992. 

The Winter season was most impressive during 1991-92. 
The girls and boys basketball teams both made it to the state 
tournament. Meanwhile, the wrestling team finished with a 14 
and 4 record, with six wrestlers qualifying as sectional 
place winners. The cheerleaders continued their support for 
the Fall and Winter. 



98 



In the Spring season the baseball team went to the 
second round of the state tournament, losing to a strong 
Abington. Softball and track & field had an increase in 
participation with young teams coming up the line. 

The new Hall of Fame had its first induction of five 
former athletes and one past coach. Over one hundred people 
attended the induction ceremony. This induction marks the 
first of a new Tri-County tradition. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Tri-County has an active Student Council that sponsored 
two dances and a teacher appreciation breakfast. The Student 
Council also contributes time and donations to various 
community projects, including an annual blood drive. 

In the Fall of 1991 and Spring of 1992, Tri-County was 
involved in a cultural and technical exchange program with 
the Rene Cassin Technical School located outside of Paris, 
France. Potential future exchanges are being explored with 
schools in Ireland and Germany. 

Tri-County has an active VICA Chapter (Vocational 
Industrial Clubs of America) . Over ninety students 
participated at the local, state and national levels. 

SUMMARY 

As we move into 1993 and continue to provide for the 
educational needs of our students, we wish to thank the 
District residents for their support and cooperation. We 
intend to maintain in the future the high educational 
standards that have earned Tri-County that support in the 
past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Vellante, Chairman 
Karl D. Lord, Medfield 



99 



WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

We have now completed a full year of operations under 
the newly voted Enterprise Fund system, and we are happy to 
report that the level of revenues generated by the increase 
in our water and sewer rates has essentially been on target. 
Sewer revenues are slightly lower than anticipated, but not 
sufficiently short to be a cause for concern at this time. 
We have accumulated approximately one half of the necessary 
funds to paint the Mt. Nebo water tower which we plan to do 
this year. 

It was again necessary to invoke a voluntary water ban 
in June. We will continue to encounter these times of 
capacity shortage until such time as we can activate Well #6 
in the northwest quadrant of Town, on State Hospital 
property. We continue to pursue the administrative process 
necessary to get this well on line. We have (through our 
consultants, Amory Engineers) filed an Environmental 
Notification Form with the Department of Environmental 
Management and the Executive Office of Environmental 
Affairs. The administrative process is expected to be 
completed this Spring, paving the way for design and 
construction of this badly needed water supply. Resolution 
of the archaeological concerns of the Commonwealth are not 
perceived as a problem at this point, unless significant 
artifacts are encountered prior to construction. We are 
currently having difficulty procuring a conservation 
easement on approximately one acre of privately owned land in 
Sherborn bordering the proposed Well #6. At the time of this 
report we are working with Sherborn Selectmen to help us 
resolve this impediment. 

Our Inflow/Infiltration Study is progressing according 
to schedule, with a draft final report to be submitted in the 
very near future by our sewer consultants, Weston and Sampson 
Engineers, Inc. It is expected to outline areas of the 
wastewater collection system that are contributing to 
inflow/ infiltration problems. It is essential to note that 
our system is now approaching the twenty year mark, and what 
once was considered new is no longer new. 

It should be noted that before any repair and/ or 
modification work can be done, we must have the 
Inflow/ Infiltration Study completed and accepted by all 
parties, including the Commonwealth. This process must be 
completed before firm planning can be given to funding or 
financial assistance from them. 



100 



On the downside, we must report an unfavorable decision 
received at the hands of our land court system regarding the 
funding of the high pressure district (Pine Street) pumping 
station. We are actively pursuing settlement of this law 
suit in order to minimize financial impact on the water 
system. 

As we have requested previously, we would request you 
voluntarily practice "odd-even" procedures as far as lawn 
watering and car washing are concerned. If your house number 
ends with an odd number, water your lawn on odd number 
calendar days, and if your house number ends in an even 
number, water on even number calendar days, thus extending 
our current pumping supply capability. 

Finally, on behalf of the Board, I would like to 
express our thanks for your continued cooperation, and to the 
employees of the Department for their continued good efforts 
to provide water and sewer services. We will, I must repeat, 
need the cooperation of all water users if we again 
experience a sustained dry period. Thanks so much for your 
continued loyal support. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Leland D. Beverage 
Peyton C. March 
John McKeever 



Chairman 




Town officials discussing sewer lines at Allendale 



101 



VETERAN'S SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

Services and assistance rendered Medfield Veterans and 
their dependents is authorized by the Commissioner of 
Veterans' Services. The Commonwealth reimburses the town 
seventy-five percent of the benefits extended. 

This assistance includes clothing, food, fuel, housing 
and medical expenses for Veterans and their families. 

Veterans' services include helping the veteran with 
pension assistance, benefits when needed, hospitalization, 
information or education, social security and burial 
allowances. 

I wish to thank Town Officials for their assistance 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Curran 
VETERANS' AGENT 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

The following is my Annual Report for the fiscal year 
of 1992. 

The following scales, weights, liquid measuring meters 
and linear measures were sealed: 

Balances and Scales 34 

Weights 129 

Liquid Measuring Meters 54 

Linear Measures 3 

A total of 143 inspections and/or seals were made 
and/or sealed for 1992. Revenue for the Department was 
$2,615.20. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Patricia A. Rioux 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



102 



MEDFIELD YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen 
and Residents of Medfield: 

At the May 1992 monthly Board Meeting of the Youth 
Advisory Commission, the Election of officers was held. The 
Executive Board was voted in as follows: 

Marc Mercadante, Chairman 
Christine Nolan, Vice Chairman 
Alisa Kendrick, Secretary. 

June 9 th, interviews were held to appoint 
Representatives to the Commission. The interviews were 
conducted by the Executive Board and four adult members. 
Forty-four applicants applied for the positions. At an 
earlier date it was the decision of the Executive Board to 
limit the number of Representatives on the Commission to 
twenty. The number of Representatives from each grade is as 
follows: Four freshman; Four sophomores; Six juniors; Six 
seniors. All other applicants would be appointed as 
Associate Members. 

The Representatives on the Commission are as follows: 

Grade 9 Grade 10 

Daniel Arnold Allison Foley 

Gregory Fournier Jennifer Logsdon 

Jillian Mariani Traci Slack 

Sheila McCabe David Taylor 

Grade 11 Grade 12 

Paul Galante III Courtney Cannon 
Ellen Gray Peter (Chip) Cornwell, Jr. 

Jennifer Karnakis Adam Gottlieb 

Sara Mastronardi Alexis Kosc 

Brendan McNulty Gregory Thomson 

Eric Palson Heather Wood 

The following were appointed as Associate Members. 

Kevin Barry Shannon Cook 

Thomas Guilmette Elizabeth McKeever 

Robert Senger David Thomas 

Neal Toomey Lauren Young 

Anna Marie Spognardi Jack Finley 

Lisa Halliday Melissa Kelcourse 

Gary Moss Lisa Petras 

Sarah Pronovost Daniel Rosen 

Nicholas Scobbo III Mara Strier 

Erica Hunt Brian Miller 



103 



The Adult members representing the Commission are: 

Wayne Currie, Director of Park and Recreation 

Mary Gillis 

William (Jack) Heller 

Colleen Lynch, School Committee 

Elizabeth (Frances) Marcel 

Thomas McNiff, Police Department 

Elizabeth Newton, Youth Outreach Worker 

Regina O'Connor, St. Edward's Youth Ministry 

Harold (Harry) Pritoni, Jr., Board of Selectmen 

Robert (Rob) Wallace. 

Six members of the Commission interacted with young 
residents of Marathon House in Walpole during this past 
summer. Every Friday for the entire day, Commissioners Peter 
(Chip) Cornwell and Gregory Thomson of C & G Landscape 
service volunteered many hours of hard work in beautifying 
the grounds at Marathon House in Walpole. 

Commissioners Daniel Arnold, Allison Foley, Thomas 
Guilmette, and Tracie Slack volunteered their time and hard 
work for "Project Face," a counseling center in Walpole per 
request of Marathon House. 

On a Saturday in December, members of the Commission 
volunteered their services for the entire day at Marathon 
House in Walpole. The volunteers painted the entire kitchen 
and living room, which included doing all the walls, trim, 
windows, doors, and kitchen cabinets inside and out. 

The crew of six Youth Commission members and two adults 
who volunteered are: Chairman Marc Mercadante, a Junior; 
Senior Peter )Chip) Cornwell, Marathon's Federal Grant 
liaison; Sophomores Allison Foley, Jennifer Logsdon, and 
Tracie Slack; Freshman Sheila McCabe; Advisor William (Jack) 
Heller; Project Coordinator Elizabeth (Frances) Marcel. 

The following four committees have been active during 
this past year: (1) Med-Vale Nursing Home Committee, various 
activities were run for the residents. (2) Recycling 
Committee, assisting the Town Recycling Committee in various 
ways. (3) Scholarship Committee, planning various 
fund-raisers for the next fiscal year. The money raised 
would be given away at the Senior High Graduation. (4) Eighth 
Grade Transition, took the entire eighth grade class on a 
complete tour of the senior high school during April and May. 

Karen Costa from the school department wrote a State 
Grant for the purpose of running Drug-Free Activities. Upon 
Karen's request the Youth Advisory Commission supported the 
grant. The Youth Commission received the Grant. 

The Marathon House emergency shelter for adolescents in 
Walpole, Ma has won a three-year grant from the Federal 
Administration for children, youth, and their families to 
establish a mobile outreach program for runaway and homeless 
youth in South Eastern Massachusetts. 



104 



A two person outreach team, assisted by teen volunteers 
from the Medfield Youth Advisory Commission, will seek out 
teens who have run away or who are without stable living 
arrangements and who are not presently under the care of the 
youth services system in Massachusetts. The Outreach staff 
will offer needs assessment, drug prevention education, 
counseling, and referral to a network of providers of medical 
and social services. The Outreach project will maintain a 
twenty-four hour telephone hot line. 

The Outreach staff and invited authorities on issues of 
importance to young people will also offer educational group 
sessions for teens, parents, and interested people in the 
communities targeted by the grant. 

The first year start-up of the Mobile Outreach Program 
will see the establishment of regularly scheduled mobile van 
stops in the towns along Route 1 in southeastern 
Massachusetts, between Dedham and North Attleboro. The 
Outreach staff and volunteers will spend time on the streets 
spreading the word about help available through the program 
and getting to know people in the area. In the second and 
third years, they will expand coverage to other cities and 
towns in Southeastern Massachusetts, including the major 
population centers of Brockton and Taunton. 

This is going to provide a great opportunity to seek 
out and identify kids who are falling through the cracks of 
the social service system. 

The Commission would like to thank the Board of 
Selectmen for helping the Marathon House to acquire their 
grant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary V. Gillis 
William (Jack) Heller 

YOUTH ADVISORY COMMISSION 



105 



106 



PUBLIC SCHOOL REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1992 



107 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



The year 1992 was characterized by continuation of the 
trends apparent over the previous several years in that the 
economy failed to show improvement when viewed from the 
perspective of local government, resources of all kinds 
remain in short supply, the position the Commonwealth will 
adopt as regards support for public schools has become 
less certain because of fiscal problems at the state level 
and because of the failure of the Legislature and Executive 
Branch to reach consensus on the larger issue of school 
reform and its ramifications for the cities and towns. At 
the same time, we are becoming more aware of increased needs 
for our schools as articulated by the citizenry in many 
forums and contexts around town, from other sources including 
the recommendations of the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges and systemwide studies of the need to upgrade 
instructional resources in the classrooms and Instructional 
Media Centers, from the obvious need to integrate 
instructional technology, and from the ever increasing en- 
rollments which are typified by the large registrations for 
kindergarten. 

A school department initiated investigation into the 
need for better, more comprehensive long-term planning 
ultimately led to the formation of a Strategic Planning 
Committee which is studying all aspects of town operations 
and numbers among its members persons from a wide variety of 
backgrounds, interests and facets of municipal activity. 

The year began with the School Committee attempting to 
reconcile the many needs of the system with a funding level 
which clearly did not allow every need to be met in a wholly 
satisfactory way. After a large number of meetings at which 
staff explained needs and the Committee refined its 
priorities, a bottom line figure was determined which 
provided the best possible support for the educational 
program for our children, which was fair to the many 
constituencies using town services, and which could be 
supported by town officials. The Warrant Committee was 
particularly helpful in bringing this task to closure. 

While the fiscal issues were being addressed, a number 
of major problems remained to be addressed and resolved. 
Among these were the retention of Medfield High School on 
warning status as a consequence of facility deficiencies 
perceived by the New England Association's Visiting 
Committee, the lack of a contract settlement between the 
Committee and the Medfield Teachers' Association, impending 
withdrawal of State reimbursement for transportation of 
students in grades 7-12 who reside within two miles of 
school, decisions regarding the acceptance or rejection of 
school choice options, the possibility of having to request 
on or two overrides of Proposition 2 1/2 funding limits, the 
feasibility of regionalizing with one or more neighboring 
towns, the need to hire a new Principal for the Wheelock 



108 



School, and the need to construct an addition and to renovate 
the High School. 

In February , community concern over the perception of 
the School Committee's handling of these and other issues 
resulted in the replacement of two committee members of long 
service and the initiation of a recall referendum for the 
remaining three members, two of who were, in fact, recalled 
at a special election in June. The proximate cause of the 
changes in the Committee's membership was a settlement with 
nonunion employees which was later reduced in response to the 
community's expressed desire. It can be presumed that after 
years of services reduction there was significant 
dissatisfaction with some or many of the Committee's 
decisions and given the press of time to deal with so many 
significant issues, a majority of the electorate concluded 
that the Committee was not sufficiently responsive to their 
wishes. It remains to be seen whether the view from the 
perspective of the citizen/taxpayer will change significantly 
as long as inadequate resources continue to limit the options 
of the School Committee. 

As of this writing, Medfield High School has been 
removed from warning status by the New England Association, 
largely due to the success of the debt exclusion override 
passed in June. The permanent School Planning & Building 
Committee has selected an architect for the High School 
addition/renovation project with the start of construction 
envisioned for the spring of 1993, the teachers' contract 
negotiations have been successfully concluded with a 
three year agreement, both school choice and regionalization 
have been rejected, and the systemwide administrative team is 
complete with the appointment of the new principal at the 
Wheelock School. The School Committee conducts quarterly 
open forums at each school, has positioned the public 
participation segment of their meetings to enhance individual 
comment on issues, and recognizes citizen comments throughout 
their meetings in an effort to maximize the opportunity for 
timely input from those attending meetings. 

As has been true historically, community participation 
and volunteer support of school programs has been unstinting. 
Those citizens who volunteer through the Community School 
Associations, the School Boosters, the Music Boosters, the 
Medfield Coalition for Public Education, the Lions Club, the 
League of Women Voters, the building and system-level 
Advisory Councils, the Odyssey of the Mind coaches, the 
America and Medfield 2000 participants, and all who organized 
and attended the Educational Retreat continue to make this 
school system as excellent as it has been and is now. We 
commend and thank them for their efforts on behalf of our 
children. 

Notwithstanding the particular difficulties we have 
experienced, both individually and collectively, during this 
past year, it would be a dereliction not to say that the 
administration and staff of the Medfield Public Schools rose 
to the occasion in such a manner as to reach new heights in a 
time of turmoil. All of the indicators of excellence in a 

109 



school system are in place and have been reaffirmed. We are 
proud of the professionalism and care they demonstrate on a 
daily basis and applaud the results they and our students 
achieve. 

Among the challenges the community and the School 
Committee face together in the coming year are the 
satisfactory completion of the construction project at the 
High School with the concomitant restructuring of the cur- 
riculum and instructional practice it will allow, the 
implementation of instructional technology to improve the 
classroom experience, accommodating increasing enrollments 
through grade-level reorganization, defining the schools' 
role in community education programs, reconciling student 
safety issues with decreased state support of transportation, 
contributing to significant educational reform through legis- 
lative action and local efforts such as Medfield 2000, and 
implementation of the wishes of the citizens as articulated 
in the soon to be published recommendations of the Medfield 
Educational Retreat. 

It is difficult to conduct long-term planning in the 
context of short-term funding. The task is made more 
difficult as staff and elected leadership enter and leave the 
system. Given that governmental agencies and the officials 
who are becoming increasingly attractive targets for the 
frustration felt by citizens as it becomes increasingly less 
possible to meet all legitimate needs, it is most important 
that more people participate in the process in any way they 
may. We have solid evidence in this community of the good 
which can be accomplished by committed individuals acting in 
concert. The tasks are formidable but progress can be made 
with sufficient diligence and determination. Those who have 
chosen to volunteer themselves, whether directly in the 
schools or other town agencies or at the policy level in 
elected or appointed positions, are motivated, as the record 
certainly shows in the Town of Medfield, by a desire to do 
their best for the community. The problem is that we never 
seem to have enough of them. While we encourage all to raise 
their level of involvement in the context of the schools, we 
are grateful for the contributions so many of you have made 
and are confident your future support can be relied upon. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MEDFIELD SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
F. Paul Quatromoni, Chairman 
Richard Fitzpatrick, Vice Chairman 
Mark Wilson, Secretary 
Clarence Purvis, Treasurer 
William Tosches, MD, Member 
Colleen Lynch, Student Member 



110 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SCHOOLS 

To the Citizens of Medfield: 

Respectfully, I submit my annual report to the citizens 
of Medfield. This past year has been extremely challenging, 
sometimes frustrating and sometimes extremely intense and 
yet, through it all, we succeeded in providing quality educa- 
tion for the children of this town. Certainly the 
achievements of excellence earned on the State Assessment 
Tests was one of our most memorable accomplishments this past 
year. I feel that the community shares enormously in the 
outstanding success and reputation that the Medfield Public 
Schools enjoys for being a school system with a strong 
academic focus, while at the same time maintaining its 
responsibility to nurture risk-taking and promote leadership. 

Other positive achievements this year include funding 
for a 6.9 million dollar addition/renovation project for the 
high school, the receipt of $184,600 in additional 
educational aid from the state and the continued high SAT 
scores achieved by our students.- Yes, Medfield does belong 
in the upper echelon of quality educational systems in the 
state and we remain vigorous in our pursuit to improve. This 
commitment was evidenced by the ninety plus people who 
attended a weekend retreat in order to contribute to our 
long-range strategic plan. A plan which will include such 
topics as long-range staff development, restructuring our 
delivery systems, greater community involvement, 
school-business partnerships, a possible restructuring of our 
school day and year, and a vision with a systemwide mission 
statement with clearly defined goals and objectives. We will 
see the final plan unveiled in the near future and it will 
have a significant impact on the entire system. 

The administration, staff, America 2000 Committee, 
Medfield Coalition, members of the community and others have 
been working hard to upgrade and integrate the most current 
and appropriate technology into our instructional strategies. 
Within the next few weeks a five year plan will be presented 
to support our technology initiative. This plan will not and 
cannot be achieved by the educators alone. There must be a 
partnership created not only with the various constituencies 
here in Medfield but also from outside the bounds of the Town 
of Medfield. The need for this style of partnership is great 
today and will be even greater in the future. At all times 
we must be sensitive to the ways in which we can provide the 
best possible education within the resources available. It 
is critical that town and school officials, taxpayers, 
parents, students and business leaders work together during 
these difficult economic times which are forcing restraint 
and restructuring. 

In conclusion, I cannot say enough about how fortunate 
we are in Medfield to have the administrative, teaching and 
support staff that we do. They are truly interested in 
making the difference for each child. They remain undaunted 

111 



during these most difficult times and I remain thankful for 
their contributions. Ultimately you, the citizens of 
Medfield, make it possible for us to do what we really do 
well and we are indebted to you for that opportunity. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas M. Reis 
Superintendent of Schools 



& 


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High School student David Ha j jar delivers a report to 
the Board of Selectmen. 



112 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with great pleasure that I submit to the citizens 
of Medfield the Annual Town Report as Assistant Super- 
intendent of Schools. The period of January 1, 1992 and 
December 31, 1992 proved to be a challenging and rewarding 
year. 

I am pleased to report that with assistance of the 
Warrant Committee and additional funding from the leg- 
islature, we were able to reinstate some educational programs 
previously reduced, address personnel needs reflective of an 
increased enrollment, and provide additional supervision 
for both programs and personnel. 

Budget 

An increase in student enrollment and projected 
collective bargaining considerations required the 
administration to offset these increases by reducing its 
operational budget by 8%. This saving of approximately 
$154,000 was the first step in ensuring that sufficient fund- 
ing would be available to address the need to increase direct 
services to children. 

In developing the FY9 3 budget, the school ad- 
ministration, working in conjunction with the Warrant Com- 
mittee, developed a strategy to meet the fiscal needs pro- 
jected by the increased student enrollment. 

Both the Warrant Committee and the School Committee 
reached consensus prior to Town Meeting that a school budget 
of $8,457,855 would be brought to Town Meeting floor. This 
budget reflected an increase of $306,000 or 3.7% over the 
FY92 budget. 

The dollars were instrumental in meeting collective 
bargaining commitments and the addition of a Grade 1 teacher, 
Grade 2 teacher, Grade 5 teacher, Grade 8 teacher and two 
teachers at the High School. 

In August of 1992 the State Legislature provided each 
school system with a onetime $100.00 grant per child. 

The Medfield Public Schools received a total of 
$184,600. This grant money was used to reinstate the follow- 
ing academic programs or positions which had been previously 
reduced: 

The "What's It Like" Program 

The DARE Program 

Grade 4 Health 

Grade 4 and 5 Instrumental Music 

A Reading Content Specialist 

113 



The Performing Artists Series 
A Wheelock School Classroom Aide 

In addition, monies were committed to fund: 
A Technology Technician 
The Medfield Education Retreat 
Wheelock School Teaching Supplies 
Computer Hardware 
Middle School Team Leaders 
Custodial Assistance at Wheelock School 

In summation, the Medfield Public Schools is most 
appreciative of the financial support which was rendered by 
both the Warrant Committee and the State Legislature. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The systemwide Curriculum Council continues to generate 
creative and improved programs for children. 

During the past year, new curricula innovations have 
occurred in the science curriculum in Grades 8 and 9; 
elementary teachers are investigating new methods of teaching 
reading; the Middle School is in the process of integrating 
the reading and foreign language programs; the Special Educa- 
tion Program has begun an aggressive inclusion model of 
teaching at all academic levels. 

The school system has initiated an innovative and cre- 
ative plan to integrate and enhance the present technology 
opportunities for students. 

In addition, this past summer approximately seventy-four 
staff members participated in research and development 
projects which have a direct impact on enhancing the quality 
of services to children. 

A priority of the system was the revision of all K-12 
Academic Compendia. This is a very aggressive and necessary 
initiative which will require approximately fourteen months 
to complete. 

We are confident that the instruction provided to the 
children of Medfield is of the highest quality and reflects 
the most current trends in education. 

Summary : 

I thank the Medfield School Committee and Superintendent 
of Schools for the commitment to provide the teaching staff 
with the resources necessary to place our children in a com- 
petitive advantage in a challenging society. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John A. Moretti 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools 



114 



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123 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 
New Personnel & Effective Date 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



PUPIL SERVICES 



Cave, Michael 


Sept. 


Anderson, Margaret 


Sept 


*Irwin, Ross 


Sept. 


Dugan, Elizabeth 


Sept 


Magnani, Virginia 


Sept. 


Sarvela-Polk Kristina 


Sept 


MIDDLE SCHOOL 








*McConnell / Ellen 


Sept. 


LIB/TECH. SPECIALIST 




*Ognibene, Donna 


Sept. 










Crompton, Marie 


Sept 


DALE STREET SCHOOL 




MEDIA/TECH . TECHNICIAN 




White, Joseph 


Sept. 


Haseltine, Wayne 


Sept 


RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 




AIDES 




Becker, Allison 


Sept. 


Amadei, Lisa 


Sept 


Holt, Lisa 


Sept. 


Karnakis, Victoria 


Sept 


McGovern, Jana 


Sept. 


*Moon, Martha 


Sept 






Mulock, Louise 


Sept 


PRINCIPAL 




*Standring, Nancy 


Sept 






Tiernan, Anne 


Oct. 


Whitten, Susan A. 


July 


Wilkinson, Janet 


Oct. 


MEMORIAL SCHOOL 




PUPIL SERVICES AIDES 




*Carey, Pauline 


Sept. 


Brown, Judy 


Sept 


Grace, Herbert 


Sept. 


*Counihan, Mary 


Sept 


Hatfield, Rebecca 


Sept. 


*Hicks, Donna 


Sept 






*Vaughn, Janice 


Sept 


COMPUTER LAB SUPERVISOR 










FOOD SERVICE 





Martin, Andrea 
Norton, Marie 

MUSIC 



Sept 
Sept 



DuPlessis, Paula 



Sept, 



*Brooks, David Sept, 
*Murphy, Dorothy Sept, 



CUSTODIAL 

Johnson, Donald 
Rogers, Thomas 

*Part-time employee 



July 
Nov. 



124 



TERMINATIONS 



SENIOR HIGH 

Economos, June (Ret.) June 

Potts, Eve (Ret.) June 

MIDDLE SCHOOL 

LeBoeuf, Armand(Ret.) June 

Therrien, Martin June 



DALE STREET SCHOOL 
Reinemann, Richard (Ret' d) June 



RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 

Barnes, Diane (Res.) July 
Snyder, Pamela (Res.) June 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

Juda, Marilyn (Ret.) June 

PUPIL SERVICES 
*Melvin, Elizabeth Aug. 



CUSTODIAN 
King, Dana 

SECRETARIAL 

*Hicks, Donna 

FOOD SERVICE 

Szylkonis, Irene (Ret'd; 

AIDES 

Kell, Pamela 
Reese, Gayle 
Stabile, Jane 
Terrenzi, Ingrid 
Woodman, Susan 

* Part-time employee 



Oct 



July 



July 



June 
June 
June 
June 
June 



LEAVES OF ABSENCES 

Amato, Carol 

Lawless-Croak, Anne 
Michaels-Brodsky, C, 
Romaine, Carol 



June 

June 
June 
June 



125 



REPORT OF THE AMOS CLARK 
KINGSBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of Medfield High School, I respectfully 
submit our Annual Report for the school year ending December 
31, 1992. 

The official enrollment of the high school for the 
1991-92 school year is 423. There were 105 students who 
graduated in the class of 1992. Of those, 97% have gone on 
to post secondary education. 

This year was marked by outstanding achievement on the 
part of many students. Among its graduates, 25% were members 
of the National Honor Society. Mark Andrews and Andrew 
Harris were Valedictorian and Salutatorian, respectively. A 
number of students were honored for academic excellence 
by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Adam 
Fontecchio was named as a finalist and competed for one of 
6,000 National Merit Scholarships. The Commended 
Students were Timothy Irwin, Alisa Kendrick, Annika Kobel, 
Stephen Korbly, Javan Rad, Elizabeth Sherwood and Meredith 
Unger. Elizabeth Sherwood was also recognized by the 
University of Massachusetts, being awarded the Chancellor's 
Award for Academic Excellence. Elizabeth also has been 
selected as a finalist from our Congressional District for a 
national science excellence award. 

Over 98% of our graduating seniors took the College 
Board Examinations. Our SAT and Achievement scores were well 
above the state and local averages. We are pleased to an- 
nounce that our verbal mean score was 48 3 and our mathemat- 
ics mean score was 531. The verbal score was the highest av- 
erage attained since the class of 1974; the mathematics score 
was the highest attained on record at Medfield High School. 

Medfield High School students not only excelled in the 
classroom but also in many areas of extracurricular ac- 
tivities. Over seventy-three per cent of the student body 
participated in our interscholastic athletic program. Many 
of our teams made tournament: boys soccer, boys and girls 
basketball, hockey, boys tennis, baseball and softball. 
Also, we had three league champions: girls winter track, 
spring track and boys tennis. 

The high school administration continued to work closely 
with the School Planning and Building Committee throughout 
the school year and summer. In the spring, at Town Meeting, 
the community voted to support a debt exclusion override in 
the amount of $6.9 million to complete an addition and major 
renovations to the high school facility. In June the 
voters, in a special election, approved the project. 
Throughout the summer and fall, schematic plans for the 
addition and renovation were approved by the Planning and 
Building Committee and the administration began work for pro- 

126 



curing reimbursement from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
at 63% of the project cost. As a result of the town's over- 
whelming support for this project, the high school was noti- 
fied in June that the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges was removing the high school from warning sta- 
tus. Construction on the project is anticipated to begin in 
June of 1993. 

As principal of Medfield High School I am more than 
satisfied with the many positive happenings which have taken 
place in our school community. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Medfield School Committee, the Superintendent of Schools, the 
Assistant Superintendent and the many parents and community 
groups for their continued support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert C. Maguire 
Principal 




Medfield High School Seniors 



127 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



OF 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1992 

Sunday, June 7, 1992 — 2:00 P.M. 



128 



PROGRAM 

PROCESSIONAL Class of 1992 

"Pomp and Qrcumstance" — Elgar 

THE NATIONAL ANTHEM Nicole Rlcard, Marty Lynn Sheldon 

Class of 1992 

OPENING REMARKS Thomas Rels 

Superintendent of Schools 

WELCOME AllssaDuBrow 

President, Class of 1992 

MESSAGE TO GRADUATING CLASS Robert Magulre 

Principal 

HONOR ESSAYS Mark Andrews, Valedictorian 

Andrew Harris, Salutatorlan 

PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIFT Jill Ikenberiy 

Treasurer, Class of 1992 

MESSAGE TO THE CLASS OF 1992 F. Paul Quatromonl 

Chairman, Medfleld School Committee 



PRESENTATION OF AWARDS 

Honor Awards Robert Magulre, Principal 

Friends of Medfleld Library Amy Flske Memorial Award Dorrle Kanter 

Medfield School Boosters Award Connie Dolan 

Medfleld School School Spirit Awards 

Medfield Teachers Association Book Awards JoAnn Soyka 

American Legion, Beckwlth Post No. 110 Scholarships Donald Mailing 

American Legion Medals 

Medfleld Youth Basketball Association Tom Cowell 

Bob Porack Memorial Aware! 

Medfield High School Theatre Society Awards Reglna O'Connor 

Robert Belmont Track and Field Team Spirit Award Stewart Palmer 

Student Council Awards Ellen Dugan 

Medfleld Musk: Boosters Award Robert Hersee 

MfdfMd h»gh School class of 1972 Book Award ,„&(/ Nym Carey 

129 



PRESENTATION OF SCHOLARSHIPS 

Hall Family Foundation Teresa Fannin 

Shaw's Supermarket Scholarship 

Boston University Academic Achievement Award 



Shaw's Supermarket Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

:hl 



Trinity University President's Scholar Robert Kinsman 

The Boston Globe Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Florida Institute of Technology Merit Scholarship 

Brigham Young University Scholarship..., F. Paul Quatromonl 

Shaw's Supermarket Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

Hofstra University Richard Fltzpatrlck 

Robert C. Byrd Scholarship Medfield School Committee 

National Merit Special Scholarship Michael C. Burandt 

Southeastern Mass Field Hockey Coaches Loretta Fahey 

Association Scholarship 

Peter Panciocco Memorial Scholarship Dr. William Tosches 

Proud to be Substance Free Scholarship Michael Frazler 

Elizabeth McKeever 

Prudential Page Realty Scholarship Susan Carney 

In memory of Angelo Contieri Assistant Principal 

Amy Flske American Field Service Scholarship Krlsten Contieri 

Madelyn L Grant Scholarships William F. Nourse 

National Honor Society Scholarships/Awards Richard Shapiro 

Hannah Adams Woman's Club Scholarships Claudette O'Brien 

Ceclle Levesque Memorial Scholarship 

Christopher Naughton Memorial Scholarship Richard Shapiro 

Medfield Uons Club Scholarships Richard Jordan 

CIBA Coming Diagnostics Scholarships Daniel Horvath 

Medfield Police Association Scholarship Sean Garvey 

Medfield Women's Association Scholarship Laura Brown 

American Legion, Beckwlth Post No. 110 Scholarship Donald Mailing 

In memory of Ed Duhamel 

American Legion Women's Auxiliary Susan Carney 

Beckwlth Post No. 110 Scholarship Assistant Principal 

Medfield Employers & Merchants Organization Scholarship Pat Scarsclottl 

Dental Health Services Scholarship Barbara Quatromonl 

Roberts-Mitchell Funeral Service Scholarship Tracy Mitchell 

Benjamin Franklin Savings Bank Scholarship George Danello 

Medfield Ladies Spring Tennis Scholarship Robert Magulre 

Principal 

•PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS 

F. Paul Quatromonl, Chairman, Medfield School Committee 
Thomas Reis, Superintendent of Schools 
Robert Magulre, Principal 

RECESSIONAL Class of 1992 

"Consecration of the House" — Beethoven 



130 



MEDFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 
GRADUATES — CLASS OF 1992 



Kerry Lee Alberta 
Christine Elizabeth Amon 

t*Mark Stewart Andrews 
Pedro Arancon Pastor 
Jennifer Kristen Armstrong 
Ryan Scott Autry 
Deborah Meredith Barry 

t'Peter Matthew BattisU 
Weslelgh Scott Behn 
John Dixon Bergman 

* Nicole Brunner Bols 
Matthew Peter Bonanno 

# David James Bright 
Sheri Leigh Brown 
Kevin Patrick Carmichael 
Jadlne Lewana Chase 
Kevin Matthew Clarke 
Rebekah Anastasia Clarke 
Stacey Lyn Cloutman 
Jason Francis Collins 
Robert Joseph Counlhan, Jr. 
Klmberly Beth Croteau 
Matthew Phillip Crowley 

* Frank Aaron D'Orlando 
Amy Lynn Danlelson 

t*Jodl Lynne Daugherty 

* Gregory William Demos 

# Sarah Elizabeth Dolan 
Allssa Jen DuBrow 
Audrey Catharine Duncan 
Katherine Jane Fitzpatrick 

t#Adam Kent Fontecchlo 
Andrew Richard Forbes 
Erin Ford 
Sarah Abigail Fosdlck 

# Christine Rose Fratollllo 
Jason Cory Frigon 

Peter Michael Gambardella 
Sean Michael Garrity 



Caron Leigh Graham 

Ryan Griffin 

John Joseph Guglletta 
t*Karen Ann Gullmette 

David Joseph Hajjar 

Laurie Ann Harman 
f'Andrew Stephan Harris 
t#Kristln Elizabeth Heavey 

Mark David Hesnan 

Almee Louise Holden 

Ian Trevor Hunt 

Jill Patrice Ikenbeny 
t*Christopher Gerard Irwin 

# Robert Anthony Jones 
Matthew Raymond Kailnowskl 

# Michael James Kaufman 
Thomas Ross Keenan 
Justin Wills Kelcourse 
Miriam Elizabeth Knapp 
Karen Melinda Krause 
Irene Elaine Krommydas 
Kevin Thomas Leary 
Erin Eavenson Lewis 
John Livingstone 

# David Lawrence Logsdon 
Heather Ann MacWiMlams 
Katherine Michelle Magyar 
Jessica Ann Malatesta 
James Matthew Martin 
Brigltte Ann Maser 
Joseph Andrew Matarazzo 
Kara Ann McDonald 

Paul Douglas McKechnle, Jr. 
Jennifer Lynn Mercadante 
Andrea Lee Miller 
Gregory Robert Miner 
Amy Molinaro 
Karen Molinaro 
Matthew Peter Nagte 



Kristl Lynne Norgaard 

# Robert Michael O'Sullivan 
Sean David Oakes 

t*Mark Andrew Ollnger 

# Gregory Joseph Orpen 
Gen Panclocco 
Jason Mjchael Pasquino 

# Stephanie Jocelyn Paul 
Matthew Keith Pelkey 
Pablo Pereda 

# Tracey Anne Powers 
Caltlln Marie Reardon 

t Nicole Irene Rlcard 
Brian Howard Robsham 

#Terrence Patrick Ryan 
Tanya Dionls Sharko 
Marty Lynn Sheldon 
Jennifer Glynn Suby 
Carol Marie Sullivan 
Laura Gall Sutton 
Amy Kristlne Swanson 
Melissa Beth Taylor 
Mark Leo Tempel 

t*Theodore David Temple 

# Brian Alan Tracey 
Chlnyere Elizabeth 

Onyekachl Utaegbulam 
Anthony Hartwell Williams 

# Todd Eric Wright 



MARSHALLS 
Stephen KorUy Elizabeth Sherwood 



tUpptr l(m of Mm graduating cUm H*darrfc«ly 
•NaOond Honor Sadriy 



131 



REPORT OF THE THOMAS A. BLAKE 
MIDDLE SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is my pleasure to submit the Thomas A. Blake Middle 
School's Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 1992. 
During the past year, we continued to strive toward meeting 
the cognitive, emotional, physical and social needs of our 
early adolescents entrusted to us by the community. 

Our team organization continued to collaborate and share 
ideas that resulted in new ways to teach and in new methods 
for learning. Our communication was improved with the 
introduction of the PhoneMaster System that electronically 
serves as a message center, bulletin board and voice mailbox 
for the entire staff. The new technology also offered the 
ability to call electronically all parents and deliver 
important messages after school hours. In June we closed the 
shop area and in September we replaced the Industrial Arts 
Program with the Technology class. The Lego Logo program was 
introduced and students seem to enjoy the classes. 

The following reflects some of the instructional 
highlights of the past year. The sixth grade students, under 
the direction of Mrs. Linda Lola engaged in an archaeological 
dig and science nature walk at the Wight Farm in Medfield. 
Thanks to the generosity of the owners, Barbara and Michael 
Cronin, students excavated a site on the two-hundred-year-old 
property finding many interesting artifacts. Students 
learned and practiced the investigative process of 
archaeologists. In conjunction with their unit on 
classifying organisms, students observed plant and animal 
life. A strong parent volunteer group supported teachers in 
this effort. 

The seventh grade team, under the leadership of Mr. 
Joseph McHugh, developed an interesting interdisciplinary 
unit that will help promote multicultural understanding among 
students by expanding their knowledge of cultural differences 
and similarities. Literature and other media have been 
selected to be used jointly in English, reading and social 
studies classes. People to be studied this year include 
Native Americans, Hispanics, Black Americans and Asian 
Americans. 

A new textbook was purchased for social studies entitled 
World Geography published by Prentice Hall in 1992 and 
includes changes in Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of 
Independent States. New Spanish textbooks were also 
purchased entitled Nuevos Amigos published by Harcourt, 
Brace, Jovanovich. A team-taught English class began in 
September. The class, taught by Mrs. Miller and Ms. Walunas, 
includes an equal number of regular education students and 
students with education plans that call for special 
assistance in the English and reading areas. The class 
provides structure, discipline, small group instruction and 

132 



individual attention 
self-esteem. 



and increases success as well 



In the spring 13 eighth grade students went to 
Washington, D.C. and to colonial Williamsburg, Virginia, over 
a four-day period. Students also met with Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy and placed a wreath at the Vietnam Wall Memorial. 
Eighth grader Elizabeth McKeever received the annual Blanche 
Kingsbury Award for Excellence in History and Lea Medeiros 
the annual Madelyn Greene Award for Excellence in 
Representative Lida Harkins took over all eighth 
social studies classes for a day during the 
unit on state government. Students then followed 
a visit to the State House and a tour by 



received 
English, 
grade 
students' 
up with 



Representative Harkins and State Senator Christopher Lane. 

Team Leader Richard DeSorgher received the Massachusetts 
1992 "Teacher-of-the-Year" Award presented by the 
Massachusetts Daughters of the American Revolution at a 
dinner ceremony in Newton. 

In the fall all eighth graders took part in the canoe 
trips down the Charles River over a five-week period as part 
of the Adopt-A-Brook interdisciplinary unit in conjunction 
with the Charles River Watershed Association. A grant from 
this association helped pay for the canoe rentals and helped 
purchase scientific testing equipment. Team teachers, Robert 
Ammon, Kathleen Craig, Richard DeSorgher and Janice Hoffman, 
took part in summer workshops sponsored by Tufts University 
and the Charles River Watershed Association to develop the 
unit centered around the Charles River. Special thanks are 
extended to the Medfield Police Department for their 
assistance with the unit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert White 
Principal 




National Geography Bee 

133 



REPORT OF THE DALE STREET SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As Principal of the Dale Street School, this will be my 
twenty-fourth Annual Report for the year ending December 31, 
1992. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment figures at Dale Street as of October 31, 1992 
were 164 students in grade four and 176 in grade five. Av- 
erage class size in grade four was 23 and grade five was 25. 

The staff was involved in Cooperative and Team Teaching 
to address enrichment and basic academic needs, as well as to 
focus on emotional and social needs. Teachers attended 
Professional Workshops and wrote Research and Development 
projects to further explore curriculum ideas. These projects 
included whole language, cooperative learning, critical 
thinking and problem solving skills. Weekly curriculum 
sessions and faculty meeting were held to coordinate and 
correlate learning activities. The "Reach Out to Schools 
Program," sponsored by Roche Bros., in collaboration with the 
Stone Center at Wellesley College, continued to be a strong 
avenue to foster students' self-esteem and develop social and 
communication skills. Katherine Belmont and Kathryn Touhey 
participated. We have fifty percent of staff actively 
involved and committed to this child-centered program. We 
expect additional staff members to become increasingly in- 
volved. 

Curriculum 

The Curriculum Night was attended by fifty parents. The 
presentations and question/answer period provided information 
on how we analyze, plan, develop, implement and re-evaluate 
our programs. 

The Science curriculum was being reviewed and pilot 
programs were conducted to assess possible adoptions in the 
future. 

The Health curriculum was formalized for grade four. 
Once a week fourth grade students received instruction by a 
Health Specialist. 

Writing continues to be a priority in the classrooms. 
Students were given daily opportunities to demonstrate their 
creativity and to develop their formalized skills such as 
spelling, sentence structure and grammar. 

Public/Parental Involvement 

Through the Community School Association and Parent 
Advisory Discussion Meetings, an exchange of information 



134 



between school and home helped to develop a stronger 
relationship. The teacher/parent conferences, School 
Newsletters and Medfield Notebook in the Suburban Press all 
enhanced communications concerning school programs and 
procedures. Parent volunteers who were assisting in the 
cafeteria, library, classrooms and field trips have made 
valuable contributions to the staff and children. The 
Medfield Coalition provided grant monies to expand and enrich 
our programs. The response from parents to tell or 
write about their children helped staff to work with children 
to attain goals in the classroom. 

Future Trends 

With the advent of technology, we're beginning to have 
children involved in the MCET Program. Future plans for more 
technology in the classrooms will be initiated during the 
next school year. 

The elementary population is increasing. We will have 
to find additional space at the Dale and Wheelock Schools to 
maintain reasonable class size in grades 1-5 in the coming 
years. The present primary enrollment is our largest in many 
years. We will require plans for reorganization at the lat- 
est for the 1994-95 school year. We will be discussing this 
matter at our parent advisory discussion meetings. We will 
also be arranging to form a committee to plan grade 
configurations for our elementary schools. 

Transition programs for grade three to grade four, and 
for grade five to grade six will continue to provide an 
orientation process for students and parents that will help 
to gain information concerning school programs, policies and 
procedures . 

Programs /Activities 

The Instrumental String Program included 150 students. 
The large enrollment necessitated scheduling lessons during 
the General Music class and within the recess period for a 
few students. We are re-evaluating this program in terms of 
scheduling logistics, commitment from students and progress 
with the instrument to determine its continuance during the 
school day. 

The After School Program, under the direction of Teri 
O'Brien, grade five teacher, was a continued success. Ac- 
tivities such as Computer, Arts and Crafts, Basketball, 
Cooking, Newspaper, Aerobics, Odyssey of the Mind and a grade 
four Variety Show were offered. Over fifty percent of the 
student population participated. 

The Performing Artist Series, under the leadership of 
Chris Taft, gave students performances that enriched and 
broadened their learning experiences. 



The DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) for fifth 
grade was taught by Officer Tom McNiff of the Medfield Police 

135 



Department. This instruction is part of the health 
curriculum and focused on self-esteem, expanding students' 
awareness and positive alternatives to drugs and alcohol. 

We were very fortunate to have such dedicated and 
conscientious staff members who really do care about chil- 
dren. The cooperation of parents in working with them is 
sincerely appreciated. The Dale Street School provided 
meaningful and interesting academic, social and cultural 
programs. We are grateful for the secretary's efforts in 
contributing to the total operation of the school and for 
all the volunteers who sacrificed their time to help 
children. We are also grateful to the custodians for their 
excellent cleaning and maintenance of facilities and to our 
bus drivers for transporting children in a caring, personable 
and responsible manner. 

We are truly grateful for the involvement of the CSA and 
the Coalition for Public Education and we thank the School 
Committee and Central Office for their leadership and di- 
rection. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 




Dale Street School students 



136 



REPORT OF THE RALPH WHEELOCK SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

Please accept this report regarding the educational 
programs and co-curricular activities of the Ralph Wheelock 
School for the year ending December 31, 1992. As principal, 
this is my first annual report for the town of Medfield. My 
employment as principal began in June of 1992. 

ENROLLMENT AND STAFF 

The Wheelock School is proud to have an enrollment of 
542 students as of October 1, 1992: 192 in grade one, 165 in 
grade two, 17 6 in grade three and 9 in a substantially 
separate class. We currently have nine sections of first 
grade, eight sections of second grade and eight sections of 
third grade. Three new classroom teachers and a new Computer 
Lab Supervisor became part of the Wheelock faculty this fall, 
as did two new members to our Special Education staff. Ihey 
are welcome additions to our dedicated community. 

It is expected that we will need to add another grade 
one classroom and another grade two classroom due to 
projected enrollments. Though space at Wheelock will be at a 
premium, we will be able to accommodate this increase for the 
1993-94 school year. New arrangements for the use of 
classroom space were developed with teacher and 
administrative input. The system will need to look at 
reorganizing for the 1994-95 school year to further meet the 
needs of our growing elementary population. This will have 
major implications for our budget. 

Staff members continued to demonstrate professional 
growth this year as evidenced by the fact that many of them 
either entered or completed masters degrees in elementary 
education. Twelve members of our community have become our 
most recent trainees in the Reach Out to School program 
through the Stone Center at Wellesley College. Former 
trainees have continued their work with this program as 
teacher researchers and program leaders within the Medfield 
Public Schools. 

The faculty of the Wheelock School began exploring the 
integration of basal reading instruction and whole language 
this year. In-service programs on this philosophy have been 
offered in-house through our coordination with Carolyn Casey, 
educational consultant in developmental education. Programs 
were conducted in October, November and December. Ms. 
Casey's work with the Wheelock staff will continue well into 
1993. This training will provide us with necessary 
information to evaluate and revise our reading program — a 
goal for the 1992-93 school year. 

We have attempted to increase our use of technologies at 
the Wheelock School. New software purchases to supplement 



137 



our existing curriculum were made this fall. A summer 
Research and Development project provided teachers with 
opportunities to engage in the software that is currently 
available through our computer lab. Two third grade teachers 
are working on a telecommunications project through National 
Geographic. The Wheelock CSA purchased a laserdisk player 
and software and a CD ROM and software for use in our 
library. Marie Crompton, Medfield's Technology Coordinator 
has evaluated our lab and our needs for upgrading our 
computer hardware. These will have a major impact on future 
staff development and budget. 

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 

The Wheelock parent community maintained its' high level 
of involvement through their volunteer efforts. Parents 
supported our programs with "What's It Like?", Rocky Woods, 
literature groups, the Victory Garden and other curricular 
and co-curricular activities. Our banking program through 
Baybank continued to be efficiently run by volunteer parents. 

A new program involving our sub-separate classroom and 
residents of the Medvale Nursing Home was begun by teacher 
Kathy Brodeur. This program provided senior citizens with an 
opportunity to visit the school and interact with our 
students. Ann Coffey, our new sub-separate class teacher, 
will continue this program. 

The Wheelock School CSA provided many opportunities for 
our students this year. Dr. Nancy Ashkar, our Scientist in 
Residence, worked with students in grades one through three 
through the winter and spring on a variety of science related 
experiments. The culmination was a Science Show at which 
each class was provided an opportunity to demonstrate their 
experiment. A residency with the Boston Children's Theatre 
is planned for 1993. 

Dr. Robert Brooks of Tufts University conducted a parent 
seminar this spring. Sponsored by the CSA, this program 
provided parents with an informative evening of parenting 
skills concerning children's self-esteem. 

Additional services provided by the CSA included a 
spring playground maintenance and clean-up, a Teacher 
Appreciation Day, our annual Fun Fair (netting $15,000), a 
fall Pumpkin Patch and Costume Swap, a Photo Fund-raiser and 
our Book Sale. Proceeds from all fund-raising events 
supported major efforts at the Wheelock School, 
including our technology purchases and our work with Carolyn 
Casey. 

The CSA introduced a new program with our Grade Three 
students in the spring. As they departed the Wheelock 
School, students created a time capsule of memorabilia from 
their Wheelock years that is now stored at the Town Hall. 
The capsule will be opened at their high school graduation. 

Students at Wheelock were privileged to engage in a 
variety of enrichment programs through the Performing Arts 

138 



Council, 
sciences 



The series included performances in the arts and 



Teachers at Wheelock also received support from the 
Medfield Coalition for Public Education. Funds were provided 
to support Carolyn Casey's work with teachers and individual 
teacher grants. As a result, a Children's Publishing Center 
will be opening at the Wheelock School in the future, second 
grade teachers will have an opportunity to engage their 
students in a Science program on butterflies and the Reading 
Lab will be able to enhance their Borrow-a-Book program. The 
CSA has also underwritten a portion of our Residency with the 
Boston Children's Theatre. 

SUMMARY 

The Wheelock School has experienced a great deal of 
change this year. With new staff and administration and new 
opportunities for professional growth, it is evident that the 
school will continue to provide quality educational services 
for Medfield' s young students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Susan A. Whitten 
Principal 




Ralph Wheelock 
Rocky Woods. 



students at Thanksgiving Feast at 



139 



REPORT OF THE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

The report for the Memorial School is for the school 
year ending December 31, 1992. 

Enrollment and Staff 

Enrollment for kindergarten was 212 students. There 
were ten sections of kindergarten with five in the morning 
and five in the afternoon. Staff was increased by a 
half-time teacher and a half-time aide. 

The school year opened successfully which can be 
attributed to individual home visits by the teachers, 
children's visitation day and classroom aides helping to 
prepare and organize materials for the classroom. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Alpha Time with its exciting letter people and the 
follow-up activities created a high motivation for children 
to learn their sounds and develop their vocabulary. Whole 
language techniques were being incorporated into the program 
through the acquisition of "Big Books" which developed their 
reading skills. 

The "Special Person," "Star of the Day," and other 
positive approaches in the classroom focused on the students' 
self-esteem. 

The Reach Out to School Program, sponsored by Roche 
Brothers in collaboration with the Stone Center at Wellesley 
College, emphasized communication and social skills in an 
atmosphere of acceptance and approval. 

The utilization of math manipulatives and hands-on 
science activities broadened and enriched the child's 
learning experiences. C.S.A. contributed to the curriculum 
with assistance in science and computer activities. 

The special subject areas of physical education, music 
and library gave the students the needed skills for a well 
balanced kindergarten program. 

Parent/Staff Involvement 

The conference method of reporting pupil progress 
continued to be a successful channel of communication between 
the teachers and parents. The schedule involved every 
parent who had an opportunity to discuss for 2 0-3 minutes 
strategies and plans to help children in their total 
development. 



140 



Parent Advisory discussions, Curriculum Night, teacher 
and school newsletters and C.S.A. board meetings provided 
important information between school and home. 

Activities 

The preparation and organization for special times of 
the year provided children with a better understanding and 
enjoyment of holidays and events. 

The field trips such as Big Apple Circus, Big Apple 
Farm, Rocky Woods, Medfield Police and Fire Station and the 
Performing Arts special programs continued to enrich the 
children's learning experience. 

Future Trends 

The elementary population is increasing. Each year we 
will have to find additional space at the Memorial and 
Wheelock Schools to maintain reasonable class size in grades 
K-3 . The present kindergarten enrollment is now 212 students 
which is our largest in many years. We will have to plan for 
reorganization at the latest for the 1994-95 school year. 

We will be discussing this matter at our parent advisory 
discussion meetings. We will also be arranging to form a 
committee to plan grade configurations for our elementary 
schools. 

Summary 

The children have an excellent beginning in their 
education with a meaningful and interesting kindergarten 
program taught by a dedicated and conscientious staff. The 
classroom aides, the special subject teachers, the pupil 
services staff, office staff, custodians and bus drivers 
contributed effectively to the total school situation. 

The C.S.A. , Medfield Coalition, volunteers and parents 
helped to make the school environment productive and 
enjoyable for staff and students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank J. Hoffman 
Principal 



141 



REPORT OF THE PUPIL SERVICES 
DEPARTMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

As the Director of Pupil Services it is my pleasure to 
submit my thirteenth annual report to you, the School 
Committee and the citizens of Medfield. 

HEALTH SERVICES 

Our school system continues to employ three and one-half 
school nurses who worked with the Lions, Dr. Galeucia and 
many trained volunteer residents to complete 2 050 screenings 
in vision and hearing last year. Of those screened, one 
hundred twenty-seven were referred to private physicians for 
further evaluation. 

Trained physical educators and nurses completed 668 
postural screenings. Of the twenty youngsters in grades five 
through nine referred to their pediatricians, eight were 
diagnosed with scoliosis. 

The nurses continue their vigilance over students 
entering our system for the first time. Children may be 
unable to attend school unless they meet the stringent State 
requirements for lead paint screening and immunizations. 

GUIDANCE SERVICES 

In recent years we have employed three guidance 
counselors for grades 6-12. There continues to be no 
guidance service at the elementary level. 

Group guidance is offered to all students at the 
secondary level. Counselors began the revision of the grade 
level compendia last summer and should complete their project 
during the spring of 1993. Students may also be seen 
individually by appointment. 

High School students continue to keep current with 
college information, financial and occupation/vocational 
information through the use of the Guidance Information 
System (G.I.S.). This computer program is updated annually 
and is widely used. 

Ninety-six percent of the class of 1992 took the SAT's; 
87.1% of these graduates were accepted to four year colleges 
while 8.9% went to a two year school after graduation. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

While the overall student population grew during 1992, 
the special education census has not. 



142 



Students December 1. 1991 December 1, 1992 

ages 3-5 26 33 
ages 6-17 259 240 
ages 18-21 5 9 

Totals 290 282 

It is our hope that the combination of pre-referral 
strategies, inclusion and co-teaching have helped to provide 
appropriate services for children within the regular 
education classroom thereby reducing the numbers in special 
education. 

Again this year, there are only nine students leaving 
Medfield for their special education programs. The goal for 
programming internally continues to be quality services at a 
greatly reduced cost. The following chart indicates 
placement for our most challenged children. 

December 1. 1991 December 1. 1992 

Integrated Preschool (Sped only) 4 7 

Wheelock Sub Separate 8 8 

Dale Sub Separate 5 

Dale Co-teaching 7 

Middle School Sub Separate 7 9 

Collaborative Placements 7 7 

Private Day 1 1 

Residential 1 1 

33 40 

We expanded our integrated preschool classes last 
September. We are currently programming for 50 three and 
four year old children from Medfield. The teacher and aides 
for this program are paid through private tuition and grant 
funds, thus saving the community approximately $77,000 in 
special education tuitions. 

Residents interested in being members of the Early 
Childhood or Pupil Services Advisory Councils are invited to 
call 359-7135 for further information. As always, we would 
welcome volunteers interested in working with our special 
needs youngsters who could benefit greatly from individual 
attention. 

PERSONNEL 

Mrs. Claudia Michaels-Brodsky has continued her child 
rearing leave. Ms. Elizabeth Dugan is filling the resource 
room position at the Dale St. and Memorial Schools. 

Ms. Beth Melvin left her 3/5 position as a psychologist 
at Wheelock School for a full-time position in another school 
system. Mrs. Nancy Salka was, therefore, transferred from 
Dale St. to Wheelock. This move allows the same psychologist 
to follow children in need of psychological services from K 
through grade 3. Mrs. Margaret Anderson has been hired to 
deliver psychological services at Dale Street three days each 

143 



REPORT OF THE MEDFIELD 
ADULT EDUCATION PROGRAM 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

January 14, 1992 was the beginning of the second se- 
mester of the 1991-92 Adult Education Program. A total of 
twelve (12) classes in nine (9) different courses were 
continued by the Director. The courses were Drivers 
Education (2), Men's Basketball (2), Aerobics (2), Yoga, 
Golf, Tap Dancing, Painting, Financial Planning and 
Volleyball. All courses were offered on Tuesday, 
Wednesday or Thursday evenings between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. 

The 1992-93 Adult Education program had an initial 
offering of seventeen (17) different courses, fifteen courses 
were established with double offerings in Drivers Education 
and Aerobics. Two hundred fifty-two adults were registered 
for the fall program. "Lowering the Cost of Your Child's 
Education," "Personal Financial Planning" and "I Do Want A 
Perfect Wedding" were three special mini-offerings. 

The Adult Education Program continues to be 
self-supporting . 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Cuoco 

Director of Adult Education 



week. 

Mrs. Kathleen Brodeur left her position as the 
substantially separate classroom teacher at Wheelock School 
to teach a regular third grade class. Consequently, Ms. Ann 
Coffey was transferred as the teacher of the Dale Street 
special education classroom to the Wheelock School class. 

The Dale Street special education class from the 1991-92 
school year has been integrated into a regular fourth grade 
class co-taught by Mrs. Kim Cave and Mrs. Julianna Colantoni, 
a special educator. 

Mrs. Donna Hicks is now working at the Ralph Wheelock 
School as a clerical aide for Pupil Services staff. Mrs. 
Donna Dolan has assumed duties as the computer operator in my 
office. 

Mrs. Carol Amato was granted a leave of absence for the 
year. Mrs. Kristina Polk has been hired to fill her 
speech/ language position at the Wheelock School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lois E. Lambert 

Director of Pupil Services 



144 



REPORT OF THE ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

I respectfully submit my eighth annual report as the 
Medfield Public Schools Director of Athletics for the year 
ending December 31, 1992. The interscholastic athletic 
program provides Medfield' s youth a positive disciplined and 
enriching atmosphere in which to develop both as an athlete 
and a person. It is my pleasure to report that over 
seventy-three percent of the entire student body participated 
in athletics during the past year. This statistic alone 
reveals the integral part athletics plays in the 
educational process. In Medfield, academics and athletics go 
hand in hand. Each contributing to the overall 
development of Medfield' s children. 

Boys and girls interscholastic teams were offered at 
three levels during the past year. The following is the 
entire athletic coaching staff by season: 

WINTER 



Basketball (Boys) 



Basketball (Girls) 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Herbert Grace 
Michael Mason 
Michael Douglas 

Thomas Cowell 
Pia Kunzig 
Kendra Smith 



Cheering 
Ice Hockey 
Indoor Track (Boys) 
Indoor Track (Girls 



Susan Medina 
Mark Trivett 
Stuart Palmer 
Michael Slason 



SPRING 



Baseball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Richard Nickerson 
Martin Salka 
Michael Douglas 



Softball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 
Freshman 



Suzanne Moulton 
Stasia Peters 
Kathleen Contacos 



Tennis (Boys) 
Tennis (Girls) 



Vincent Joseph 
C. Peter Goodall 



145 



SPRING (Continued) 
Track & Field (Boys) 
Track & Field (Girls) 



Cheering 
Cross Country 
Field Hockey 



FALL 



Football 



Soccer (Boys) 



Soccer (Girls) 



Volleyball 



Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 



Junior Varsity 
Freshman 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 

Varsity 
Junior Varsity 



Edward Rock 

Michael Slason 

Neil DuRoss (Assist.) 



Susan Medina 

Michael Kraemer 

Loretta Fahey 
Pauline Carey 

Vincent Joseph 
Michael Slason (Assist.) 
William Young (Assist.) 
Joseph Farroba 
Herbert Grace 

Edward Rock 
William Pope 

Dawn Young 
Barbara Laronga 

John Hastings 
Michelle Buettner 



All of our interscholastic teams participated in the 
Tri-Valley League, which consists of Ashland, Bellingham, 
Dover-Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, 
Millis and Westwood. Medfield is currently ranked fifth in 
the TVL in total enrollment, grades nine through twelve. The 
league is highly competitive in all sports, boys and girls. 
Tri-Valley teams traditionally are quite successful in state 
tournament play. 

Our athletic highlights begin with the winter season, 
1991-92. The girls indoor track team went undefeated for the 
second year in a row, won the TVL and placed six team members 
on the All League Team. Our boys indoor team finished third 
in the league. Seniors Ryan Autry (two mile) and David 
Bright 3 00) were Class D State Champions. Boys basketball, 
coming in at 12-8, qualified for state tournament play and 
advanced to the second round. . They also won the Viking 
Christmas Tournament held in East Bridgewater. Our girls won 
the same tournament for the second consecutive year, finished 
at 15-5 and advanced to the sectional quarter-finals. Ice 
hockey placed second in the TVL and also qualified for 
tourney play with a record of 10-7-3. 

The spring of 1992 was filled with great performances. 
Boys tennis, with a record of 14-2, tied for the TVL 
championship. Sophomore Brendan Cutter was named the 
league's Most Valuable Player. The girls team finished third 



146 



in league play, just missing tournament qualification by one 
match. Softball, while qualifying for the fifteenth 

consecutive year, played to a 14-4 record and tied for second 
place in the league. They advanced to the sectional 
semi-finals. Baseball also finished at 14-4 and in second 
place. They too advanced to the semi-finals through timely 
hits and an outstanding pitching staff. The girls track team 
won the league title for the third consecutive year, going 
9-0-0. They are undefeated over this span with an overall 
mark of 26-0-2! Senior Katie Fitzpatrick set a new school 
record in the 3 00 hurdles. Our boys placed third in a 
particularly strong league. Senior Ryan Autry established a 
new school record in the two mile. 

Fall 1992 proved very exciting for our girls cross 
country team. They finished 6-1 dropping a championship 
showdown in the season's last meet by the narrowest of mar- 
gins. Senior Meredith Unger set a new Medfield course 
record. The boys team was young and very competitive coming 
in at fourth place while showing great promise. The football 
team improved on all fronts with exciting wins, large par- 
ticipation (eighty-five) , and a third place TVL finish. The 
Thanksgiving day victory over Dover-Sherborn was espe- 
cially satisfying after having to settle for a tie last year. 
Seniors Kevin Kelly and Steven Dunlea were name Home- 
coming and Thanksgiving MVP's, respectively. Girls soc- 
cer was competitive in a great league, scoring in every game 
and coming up with six ties along the way. The boys missed 
tourney by one win, went 9-7-2 and finished fourth in the 
TVL. Co-captain Mike Pritoni was named an All Eastern Mas- 
sachusetts player. Volleyball continues to improve, add- 
ing five wins and two places in the final standings over 
1991. With many players returning, 1993 looks very 
promising. Field Hockey placed fourth in the TVL and was a 
young team. Highlights included a great 1-0 shutout of 
perennial power Holliston late in the season. 

Sports recognition evenings in November, March and May 
were well attended and enthusiastically received. The annual 
All Sports Banquet, sponsored by the Medfield School Boost- 
ers, was held in early June. Medfield High School's "Wall of 
Fame" 1992 inductees included: Clinton Clark, Class of 1945; 
Frank Clewes, '54; John Johannsessen, '75 and Colleen 
Neary, '85. Each inductee was in attendance and briefly 
addressed the audience of 500 students-athletes and parents. 
At the banquet, in addition to the individual sport MVP 
awards, Sarah Dolan and Brian Tracy were named the 1991-92 
Scholar/Athlete recipients. At the June graduation exer- 
cises, Alissa DuBrow and David Logsdon were named re- 
cipients of the School Boosters Spirit Award. The Robert 
Porack Memorial Basketball Scholarships given by Medfield 
Youth Basketball Association (M.Y.B.A.) were awarded to Karen 
Krause, Jim Martin and Greg Miner. The Robert Belmont Memo- 
rial Track and Field Spirit Award was presented to Ryan 
Autry . 



147 



Tri-Valley League All Star 
follows: 



selections for 1992 are as 



Boys Basketball 



Greg Miner 
Jim Martin 
Matt Konevich 



Girls Basketball 



Michelle Scecina 
Meredith Dunn 
Karen Krause 



Ice Hockey 



Peter Gambardella 
Glen Panciocco 
Jesse Sullivan 



Boys Indoor Track 



Girls Indoor Track 



Baseball 



Ryan Autry 
David Bright 
Mark Olinger 

Katie Fitzpatrick 
Irene Krommydas 
Meredith Unger 
Judy Fitzpatrick 

Rob 0' Sullivan 
Steven Dunlea 
Garrett Larkin 
John Dunn 



Softball 



Tracy Frank 
Michelle Scecina 



Girls Tennis 
Boys Tennis 



Jill Ikenberry 

Andy Harris 
Mike Kaufman 
Brandon Cutter 



Boys Track 



Ryan Autry 
David Bright 
Jim Martin 
Sean Fitzpatrick 
Mike McKechnie 



Girls Track 



Irene Krommydas 
Katie Fitzpatrick 
Meredith Unger 
Liz Sullivan 



Cross Country 



Field Hockey 



Meredith Unger 
Sarah Oscarson 
Kerri Comeau 

Valarie Dolan 



Football 



Kevin Kelly 
Keith Angel 1 



148 



Boys Soccer Michael Pritoni 

Marc Mercadante 

Girls Soccer Michelle Scecina 

Volleyball Sangeeta Welankiwar 

Our fall and winter cheering teams, under the guidance 
of Susan Medina, were, as always, talented and creative. 
They constantly contribute to the athletic program's 
success by providing leadership, support and much enthusiasm 
to our teams, spectators and community. Year after year, 
their cheering and dance routines are without equal in the 
Tri-Valley League. The annual Homecoming Pep Rally organized 
by the fall cheering team was spectacular! 

This concludes my eighth annual report of the Director 
of Athletics. I would like to thank, on behalf of all the 
Warriors, the School Committee, the administration, the 
Medfield School Boosters and the community for all of their 
support throughout the year ending December 31, 1992. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas E. Cowell 
Director of Athletics 



149 



REPORT OF FOOD SERVICE DIRECTOR 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

It is with pleasure that I submit this Annual Report for 
the Food Service Department for the year ending December 31, 
1992. 

Promoting good health and nutrition has always been a 
problem with school children. By government regulations a 
full "Type A" lunch must be offered daily. 

Writing my monthly menus I am very aware of the 
student's diet, especially the fat content. The Medfield 
Schools kitchens oven bake all of their products. We do not 
fry foods. Daily we offer all schools low fat (Nuform and 
Chocolate) milk, as well as whole milk. I try to balance my 
weekly menus with school made products, prepared foods and 
the use of government commodities that are offered. 
Also, I have to offer lunches to the students that I know 
they will purchase as well as meals that will be 
nutritionally healthy. 

I am active in professional organizations, The Education 
Cooperative (TEC) and I attend state run seminars. Food Ser- 
vice Directors are constantly aware of nutrition problems and 
new products that are available to us. 

Some menus, especially at the younger levels, appear 
very repetitive. At the high school level I will try a new 
product and have sometimes found that all the effort and 
expense put into the lunch is not worth it, as the students 
prefer to purchase and eat lunches they have had before 
and they know they will like. 

This year the high school daily offered its students the 
choice of three "deli" style sandwiches, deep dish pizza, a 
salad bar, along with other "Type A" lunch items. This is a 
difficult age group to please. They are more demanding in 
their eating habits, require more variety and choices. 

The prepaid meal ticket is offered by the year, half 
year and monthly. This continues to be a success and I feel 
it is very helpful to working parents. 

Medfield Schools all have operating dishwashers. We use 
stainless flatware in our schools and recycle our large cans. 

Repair costs have been lower with the help of a 
maintenance specialist. I have now been able to ask our 
specialist to look at the problem to see if he can repair 
in-house or if I have to call for outside assistance. 

Most of the food costs are on a yearly bid. Some of 
these prices have been obtained due to the fact that Medfield 
is a member of TEC Collaborative. The rest of the prices I 



150 



have obtained myself. I have found vendors to be more 
competitive. I will not purchase products at the least 
expensive price. Most of my products are purchased by brand 
name. My managers keep me informed on products that are good 
or products that we feel are unacceptable. As a result of 
yearly bids I am able to project my expenses. This past year 
we have not raised lunch prices but we did raise milk, snack 
items and teachers' lunch prices by five cents, as I know 
financially what is needed for my budget during the 1992-93 
school year. 

During this year, for the first time in many years, Food 
Service has been completely self-sufficient. We have 
received no appropriations from the town. The department was 
restructured in September 1991. We have saved the town 
thousands of dollars, which has allowed the previously 
appropriated funds to go back into the system for the 
children. This requires me to be aware of my finances and to 
constantly watch my expenses daily. 



Income Expenses 

Lunch Receipts $174,963.97 Food & Supplies $100,094.24 

Functions 28,481.50 Labor 114.529.92 
Government Claim 28 , 551.87 

$231,997.34 $214,624.16 



Respectfully submitted, 

Sharon Martin 

Food Service Director 



151 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR 
OF PLANT MANAGEMENT 



To the Superintendent of Schools: 

We continued to make progress in this the second year of 
operation with a half-time Director of Plant Management and 
an operating budget 7% less than 1991 . We have been able to 
reduce the maintenance budget a total of 15% in the last two 
years. Lack of assistance from Pondville Industries, as 
promised, severely limited our ability to accomplish more 
during the summer vacation period. Our temporary summer help 
was committed mainly to the rehab of the high school gym 
and groundskeeping. However, in addition to the regular 
maintenance and custodial functions, we have completed the 
following projects: 

General 

Installation of backflow preventer valves completed at 
all schools. 

Asbestos removal and repair at all schools. 

Building inspections conducted with Building Inspector 
and Fire Chief prior to opening of school in September. 

Met with Assistant Superintendent and his Parent 
Advisory Committee to answer questions and listen to concerns 
about custodial and maintenance services. 

All boilers, smoke boxes and chimneys were cleaned in 
all schools. 

Shrubbery around all schools was pruned and mulched as a 
volunteer project of the Scouts under the directions of 
Andrew Merck, working for his Eagle badge. 

All boilers and air tanks were inspected and certified. 

The Assistant Superintendent and I met with all Head 
Custodian individually, regarding processes, personnel and 
performance levels in their respective buildings. 

Plans have been developed to bring the remaining 
underground fuel storage tanks into regulatory compliance for 
spill protection. 

A number of electric motors have been rebuilt or 
replaced with new energy efficient units. 

Steam trap repair and replacement is an on going effort 
in order to improve efficiency of our steam heating. 

Several circulating pumps have been rebuilt in hot water 
heating systems. 



152 



Many kitchen appliances have been serviced by the 
Maintenance Technician replacing contracted services. 

Dale Street School 

New perimeter doors have been installed and painted. 
This will improve energy conservation and safety as well as 
meet the regulations for access by disabled persons. 

Six second floor classrooms were painted. 

File room constructed in basement of Dale Street School 
for mandated file retention. 

Wooden ramp to lobby replaced with concrete. 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 

The high school switched to natural gas fuel for heating 
1/28/92. 

Refurbished gym, painted walls and exposed steel 
girders; dismantled, planed and sealed, repaired and 
reassembled bleachers; sanded, restripped and applied three 
coats of sealer to floor. 

Asbestos containing fire curtain in the auditorium has 
been replaced with an approved non-asbestos fire curtain. 
Curtain release mechanism was updated to comply with new code 
requirements . 

Memorial School 

New perimeter doors have been installed and painted. 
This will improve energy conservation and safety as well as 
meet the regulations for disabled persons access. 

The inoperable air conditioner in the library has been 
replaced. 

Replaced the main water shut-off valve. 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 

Emergency repair made to gym roof to prevent damage to 
recently refurbished floor. 

Weatherproof ed windows south side of Middle School. 

Replaced three of the most used exit doors, refurbished 
gym and main entrance door hardware, replaced several door 
closers on interior doors. 

School boilers received fire box repairs, one boiler 
section was replaced and all nipples at the top of the 
sections were replaced before completely reinsulating with 
non-asbestos insulation. 



153 



Two new basketball stanchions, backboard and hoops were 
installed in the outdoor court at the Middle School. 

Preliminary study completed on Middle School for energy 
conservation. 

Ralph Wheelock School 

Installation of a chair lift at the Ralph Wheelock 
School. 

Relamping of the Ralph Wheelock School by Boston Edison 
at no cost to the town. 

Replaced east gym flooring. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Austin C. "Buck" Buchanan 
Director of Plant Management 




Memorial School kindergarteners 



154 



TOWN CLERK*S REPORT 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1992 



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164 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
March 10, 1992 

Norfolk, ss 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 
qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at Precincts 1, 2, 3, 
and 4 at the Memorial School Auditorium , Adams Street, on 
Tuesday, the tenth day of March, 1992 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 
P.M. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the Presidential Primary for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE FOR THIS COMMONWEALTH 

STATE COMMITTEE MAN. . .1ST SUFFOLK & NORFOLK DISTRICT 
STATE COMMITTEE WOMAN. .1ST SUFFOLK & NORFOLK DISTRICT 
TOWN COMMITTEE MEDFIELD 

The polls will be open from 6 A.M. to 8 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Given unto our hands this 18th day of February, 1992 A.D. 



John F. Ganley, Chairman 
Harold F. Pritoni, Clerk 
Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



Norfolk, ss 

PURSUANT TO THE WITHIN WARRANT, I have notified and warned 
the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield by posting up 
attested copies of the same at five public places fourteen 
days before the date of the meeting, as within directed. 



/s/ Ronald W. Kerr, Constable 
February 17, 1992. 



165 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

MARCH 10, 1992 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 
6:00 A.M. with the swearing in of the election workers 
present. The ballot boxes were inspected and found to be in 
working order, specimen ballots posted, voting list displayed 
and instruction to the voters were posted. 

WARDEN: Nancy Frank, Anna Murphy 

TELLERS: Mabelle Maguire, Gail Rad, Katherine Buchanan, 
Margaret O'Brien, Anna Murphy, Patricia Rioux, Joan Bussow, 
Sadie Carson, Dorothy Sumner, Geroge Mentzer, Ann Mentzer, 
Anna Floser, Edith 0' Toole, Elton Bassett, Frances Colella, 
Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lordon, Nancy Frank, Mary 
MairEtienne, Emmy Mitchell, Nancy Preston, Clara Doub, James 
Preston, and Gary Stapin. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,3 61. 401 Republicans, 959 Democrats, 
and 1 Independent. Total Registered Voters numbered 6,521. 
21% of the voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results 
were as follows: 



DEMOCRATIC BALLOTS 



PRECINCT 
12 3 4 



TOTAL 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 
Ralph Nader 
Lyndon H. LaRouche 
Jerry Brown 
Tom Harkin 
Larry Agran 
Paul Tsongas 
Eugene McCarthy 
Bill Clinton 
Robert Kerrey 
No Preference 



42 

7 

241 

5 

4 

1,191 

5 

113 

4 

24 



REPUBLICAN BALLOTS 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Patrick J. Buchanan 
David Duke 
George Bush 
No Preference 



248 
10 

685 
22 



166 



Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabel le Maguire, Gail Rad, Katherine 
Buchanan, Margaret O'Brien, Anna Murphy, Patricia Rioux, Joan 
Bussow, Sadie Carson, and Dorothy Sumner. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 



A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



167 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
WARRANT FOR ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
MARCH 30, 1992 

Norfolk, ss. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in said 

County, greetings 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to notify 
and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified 
to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet at the 
Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Monday, the thirtieth 
day of March, A.D., 1992 at 6:00 o'clock A.M., then and there 
to act on the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To choose all Town Officers required to be elected 
annually by ballot, viz: 

One Moderator for one year. 

Member Planning Board for one year each 
One Selectman, two members of the School Committee, Two 

members of the Park and Recreation Committee. Two 

members of the Board of Trustees of the Public 

Library each for three years. 
One Member of Planning Board and one member of the 

Housing Authority, each for five years. 

The polls will be open at 6:00 o'clock A.M. and shall be 
closed at 8:00 o'clock P.M. 

On Monday, the twenty-seventh day of April, A.D., 1992, com- 
mencing at 7:30 o'clock P.M. the following articles will be 
acted on in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School gymnasium in 
said Medfield, viz: Articles 2 through 30. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof, in the usual place for posting 
warrants in said Medfield, seven days at least before the 
teime of holding said meeting. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place of 
meeting aforesaid. Given unto our hands this tenth of March, 
1992, A.D. Nineteen Hundred and Ninety-two. 

John F. Ganley 
Harold F. Pritoni 
Ann B. Thompson 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

COMMONWEALTH FOR MASSACHUSETTS 
Norfolk ss 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, by 
posting attested copies of the same at five public places 
seven days before the date of the meeting, as within 
directed. 

Kevin Robinson, Constable of Medfield, March 11, 1992 

168 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
TOWN ELECTION 

MARCH 30, 1992 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 
6:00 A.M. with the reading of the warrant, and the swearing 
in of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots 
posted, voting list was displayed and instructions to the 
voters posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts. 

WARDEN: Elmer 0. Portman, Jr. 

CLERKS: Precinct 1: Mary MairEtienne, Mabelle Maguire, 

Precinct 2: Nancy Frank, Emmy Mitchell 

Precinct 3: Gail Rad, Anna Murphy 

Precinct 4: Katherine Buchanan, Phyllis Wilmarth 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabelle Maguire, Gail Rad, Katherine 
Buchanan, Margaret O'Brien, Priscilla Anderson, Anna 
Murphy, Patricia Rioux, Joan Bussow Sadie Carson, Dorothy 
Sumner, George Mentzer, Ann Mentzer, Anna Floser, Frances 
Colella, Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lordon, Nancy Frank, 
Mary MairEtienne, Emmy Mitchell, Gary Stapin, David 
Wilmarth Phyllis Wilmarth, Dorcas Owen, Georgia Colivas, 
Margaret Eppich, Irene O' Toole, Alexander Smith, 

Polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 2,715. Absentee ballots 68. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results 

were as follows: 



MODERATOR (one year) VOTE FOR ONE 

Ralph C. Copeland 

Blanks 



SELECTMEN 

Ann B. Thompson 

Blanks 

Scattered 

ASSESSOR (three year) 
Clara E. Doub 
Blanks 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE (three Years) 

Vote for not more than TWO 
William A. Hajjar 
Gay D'Amaro 
Mark F. Wilson 





PRECINT 




1 


2 


3 


4 


Blanks 


471 


515 


572 


518 


2076 


150 


157 


165 


167 


639 


470 


525 


579 


520 


2094 


149 


147 


158 


165 


974 


2 


4 


2 




8 


461 


503 


578 


526 


2068 


160 


169 


159 


159 


647 


109 


162 


151 


172 


594 


98 


141 


135 


101 


475 


495 


473 


575 


512 


2055 



169 



455 451 513 


460 


1879 


85 117 100 


125 


427 


2 




2 



Richard M. Fitzpatrick 

Blanks 

Scattered 

PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

(three years) Vote for not more than TWO 
John P. Monahan 443 481 540 482 1946 

Geralyn M. Warren 422 451 524 461 1858 

Blanks 377 412 410 427 1626 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES (three Years) 

Vote for not more than TWO 
James C. Baughman 431 479 545 495 1950 

Richard M. Fitzpatrick 417 422 462 446 1747 

Blanks 394 443 467 429 1733 

PLANNING BOARD (one Year) 

Daniel W. Nye 470 506 558 519 2053 

Blanks 151 166 179 166 662 

PLANNING BOARD (five years) Vote for ONE 

Paul B. Rhuda 327 317 289 319 1252 

Charles H. Debevoise 194 254 307 236 911 

Blanks 100 101 141 130 472 

HOUSING AUTHORITY (five years) Vote for ONE 

Diane B. Nightingale 479 507 570 526 2082 

Blanks 142 165 167 159 633 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



170 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FOR THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS 
April 27, 1992 

On Monday, the twenty-seventh day of April, A.D., 1992, 
commencing at 7:45 P.M., there being a quorum, the meeting 
was called to order, in the Amos Clark Kingsbury School 
gymnasium in said Medfield, by the moderator. The meeting 
commenced with the salute to the flag by all voters followed 
by the singing of the Star Spangled Banner by Catherine Gray. 

The following articles were acted on, viz: 

ARTICLE 2 . To see if the Town will vote to accept the re- 
ports of the several Town Officers for the past year. 

VOTE: Voted to accept the reports of the 
several Town Officers for the past year. 

(Consent Calendar) 4-27-92 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will authorize the 
Treasurer/Collector to use all means in the collection of 
taxes as the Treasurer/Collector might if elected to that 
office. 

VOTE: Voted to authorize the Treasurer /Collector 
to use all means in the collection of taxes 
as the Treasurer 

(Consent Calendar) 4-27-92 

ARTICLE 4 . To see if the Town will vote to accept Chapter 
281 of the Acts of 1990, (amending General Laws, Chapter 
60, Section 2) , whereby no tax shall be collected if the 
actual real or personal property tax due is less than ten 
dollars ($10.00), or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

VOTE: Voted to accept Chapter 281 of the Acts of 
1990, (amending General Laws, Chapter 60, 
Section 2), whereby no tax shall be 
collected if the actual real or personal 
property tax due is less than ten dollars 
($10.00) . 

(Consent Calendar) 4-27-92 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to accept the fol- 
lowing named sums as Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of 
lots in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest thereof as may 
be necessary for said care, viz: 

Nancy A. Hosey $ 600. 

Laura E. Howes 3 00. 

Kenneth L. Issacs 1,500. 

H. Tracy Mitchell 900. 

Albert J. and Therese H. Menard 1,2 00. 

Nancy Miele and Ralph Telia 1,200. 

Dorothy Telia and Dr. Ralph Telia 1,200. 

Barbara Berne 1,200. 

Angelo Santucci 3,000. 

Marilyn Donnelly 300. 

171 



Stuart Wood 3 00. 

Robert K. and Ruth L. McCarthy 1,500. 

Francis L. Tammaro 1,800. 

Mario J. and Ellen G. Catenacci 350. 

Joseph A. amd Mary V. Gillis 300. 

David L. and Dorcas Owen 1,000. 

Gary T. and Joan M. Miner 2 00. 

Suzanne M. Phillips 600. 
Donald R. and Pauline D. Hayes $ 1,400. 

Marie K. Roberts 700. 

Robert J. and Shirley A. Larkin 1,800. 

Doris Bergen and Joel Fink 3,000. 

Margaret R. Cruickshank 1,400. 

Mary T. Smith 1,400. 

Grace M. Loerch 3 50. 

Mabel M. Rogers 1,400. 

Anne M. Sarno 3 50. 

Genevieve M. Friswell 1,400. 

Sylvia I. Gerber 3 50. 

Anthony P. Iafolla 1,400. 

Joseph W. and Mary J. Timmerman 1,400. 

Odelia C. Kean 700. 

$ 34,500. 

VOTE: Voted to accept the following named sums as 
Perpetual Trust Funds for the care of lots 
in the Vine Lake Cemetery, the interest 
thereof as may be necessary for said care, 
viz. (Consent Calendar) 

4-27-92 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to accept an equal 
educational opportunity grant for Fiscal Year 1993 in the 
amount of $101,062, under the provisions of general Laws of 
Chapter 70A, Section 5 as inserted by Chapter 188 of the 
Acts of 1985; said grant shall be expended by the 
Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School District 
Committee for direct service expenditures, or do or act 
manner relating thereto. 

(Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School) 

VOTE: Voted to accept an equal educational 
opportunity grant for Fiscal Year 1993 in 
the amount of $101,062. under the provisions 
of General Laws of Chapter 70A, Section 5 as 
inserted by Chapter 188 of the Acts of 1985; 
said grant shall be expended by the 
Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical 
School District Committee for direct service 
expenditures. (Consent Calendar) 4-27-92 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to accept as public 
ways the following named streets, or parts theeof: 

Lakewood Terrace from Station 2+50 to 4+50 
Sewall Court in its entirety 
Tannery Drive in its entirety 

as laid out by the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the several Orders of Layout on file with 

172 



the Town Clerk's office and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain or otherwise, such 
rights, titles and easements, including drainage easements, 
as may be necessary to accomplish such purposes, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectman) 

VOTE: Voted to accept as public ways the following 
named streets, Lakewood Terrace from Station 
2+50 to 4+50; Sewall Court in its entirety; 
Tannery Drive in its entirety as laid out by 
the Board of Selectmen and as shown on plans 
referred to in the several Orders of Layout 
on file with the Town Clerk's office and to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by eminent domain or otherwise, such rights, 
titles and easements, including drainage 
easements, as may be necessary to accomplish 
such purposes. 

(Consent Calendar) 4/27/92 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purpose of conducting a Hazard- 
ous Waste Collection Day, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the town raise and appropriate 
the sum of $5,000. on the 1993 tax levy for 
the purpose of conducting a Hazardous Waste 
Collection Day. 4/28/92 

ARTICLE 9. To see what sum the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate on the fiscal 1992 tax levy to be used in con- 
junction with and in addition to any funds allotted by the 
Commonwealth for the construction, reconstruction and im- 
provement of roads under the provisions of Section 34, 
Chapter 9 of the General Laws, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(11:00 P.M. Rules suspended) 

VOTE: Voted that the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to enter into contracts with the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department of 
Public Works and to expend funds allotted by 
the Commonwealth for the construction, 
reconstruction and improvement of roads 
under the provisions of Section 3 4 of 
Chapter 9 of the General Laws. 

(Superintendent of Public Works) 4-28-92 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 40, Section 
22F, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) (Dismissed 4/28/92) 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 40, Section 
21D, Noncriminal Disposition of Certain Violations, or do or 

173 



act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 
VOTE: Voted that the Town accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Law, Chapter 40, 
Section 21D, Noncriminal Disposition of 
Certain Violations 

4/28/92 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to fix the salary 
and compensation of the following elected officers: Mod- 
erator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, Assessors, School Committee, 
Trustees of the Public Library, Park and Recreation Commis- 
sion, Planning Board, Housing Authority, or do or act any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 





Present 


Warrant Comm. 


Officer 


Salarv 


Recommends 


Moderator 


0. 


0. 


Housing Authority 


0. 


0. 


Town Clerk 13, 


r 125. 


13,125. 


Selectman, Chairman 


900. 


900. 


Selectman, Clerk 


800. 


800. 


Selectman, 3rd Member 


800. 


800. 


Assessors, Chairman 


900. 


900. 


Assessors, Clerk 


900. 


900. 


Assessors, 3rd Member 


900. 


900 


School Committee 


0. 


0. 


Library Trustees 


0. 


0. 


Planning Board 


0. 


0. 


Park & Recreation 


0. 


0. 



Commission 

VOTE: Voted to fix the salary and compensation of 
the . Moderator, Town Clerk, Selectmen, 
Assessors, School Committee, Trustees of 
Public Library, Park and Recreation 
Commission, Planning Board, and Housing 
Authority, as set out in the Warrant: 
(4-27-92) 



Officer 



Warrant Committee 
Present Salary Recommends 



Moderator 


0. 


0. 


Housing Authority 


0. 


0. 


Town Clerk 13 


,125. 


13,519. 


Selectman, Chairman 


900. 


900. 


Selectman, Clerk 


800. 


800. 


Selectman, 3rd Member 


800. 


800. 


Assessors, Chairman 


900. 


900. 


Assessors, Clerk 


900. 


900. 


Assessors, 3rd Member 


900. 


900. 


School Committee 


0. 


0. 


Library Trustees 


0. 


0. 


Planning Board 


0. 


0. 


Park & Recreation 


0. 


0. 


Commission 







174 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Personnel Administration Plan, effective July 1, 1992 to read 
as follows: 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION PLAN 
CLASSIFICATION OF POSITIONS AND PAY SCHEDULE 

SALARIED POSITIONS Minimum 2nd Step 3rd Step 4th Step Max 

Police Department (Weekly) 

Police Sergeant 558.39 580.88 609.04 633.41 

Police Officer 438.43 469.19 505.27 538.93 560.39 

Specialist Range 350 (Annual stipend) 2,000.00 

Police Officers designated as Detective, Photographer 
Fingerpr inter, Prosecutor, Animal Control Officer or 
Assistant Animal Control Officer by the Police Chief shall 
receive additional compensation annually at a rate to be 
determined by the Police Chief within the above Specialist 
Range. In the absence of a police sergeant being on duty, 
the senior of f icer-in-charge of any shift shall be paid an 
additional $4.00 per shift. 

G. Police Officers: For all regularly scheduled shifts 
starting after 3:00 p.m. and finishing prior to 8:00 a.m., a 
night shift differential of $4.50 per shift will be paid, 
said sum to be paid annually during the month of June. 

TOWN MANAGERIAL POSITIONS Minimum Midpoint Maximum 

Streets. Water and Sewer Department 

Supt. of Public Works 38,545 47,889 57,233 

Police Department 

Chief 42,049 51,393 60,737 

Fire Department 

Chief 36,793 45,553 54,313 

Executive Departments 

Town Administrator 46,721 58,401 70,081 

Administrative Assistant 28,032 33,873 39,713 

Treasurer/Collector 36,793 44,553 54,313 

Library 

Director 28,032 33,873 39,713 

Other Salaried Position 

Board of Health 

Detached Social Worker 22,569 28,227 

Cemetery 

Cemetery Supervisor 25,956 31,364 36,771 

Executive Departments 

Town Accountant 25,956 31,364 36,771 



175 



Hourly Positions 



Library 














Children' 


s Librarian 


9. 


04 11, 


.28 


12.36 


Reference Librarian 


9. 


04 11, 


.28 


12.36 








HOURLY 


PAID POSITIONS 






Grade 


Minimum Wacre 


Minimum 


2nd Stec 


3rd Step 


4th Steo 


Maximum 


1 




$4.25 


5.95 


6.24 


6.57 


6.91 


7.30 


2 






6.24 


6.57 


6.91 


7.30 


7.65 


3 






6.57 


6.91 


7.30 


7.65 


8.09 


4 






6.91 


7.30 


7.65 


8.09 


8.50 


5 






7.30 


7.65 


8.09 


8.50 


8.93 


6 






7.65 


8.09 


8.50 


8.93 


9.41 


7 






8.09 


8.50 


8.93 


9.41 


9.91 


8 






8.50 


8.93 


9.41 


9.91 


10.42 


9 






8.93 


9.41 


9.91 


10.42 


11.00 


10 






9.41 


9.91 


10.42 


11.00 


11.56 


11 






9.91 


10.42 


11.00 


11.56 


12.21 


12 






10.42 


11.00 


11.56 


12.21 


12.81 


13 






11.00 


11.56 


12.21 


12.81 


13.49 


14 






11.56 


12.21 


12.81 


13.49 


14.20 


15 






12.21 


12.81 


13.49 


14.20 


14.96 


16 






12.81 


13.49 


14.20 


14.96 


15.75 


17 






13.49 


14.20 


14.96 


15.75 


16.53 


18 






14.20 


14.96 


15.75 


16.53 


17.37 



Lower rates as authorized by 
Massachusetts may also be paid. 



the 



Commonwealth 



of 



HOURLY GRADE LISTINGS 



GRADE 1 

Swimming Instructor 

Lifeguard Instructor 

$1,427. minimum per season 

Playground Counselor 

Lifeguard 

$1,188. minimum per season 

GRADE 2 

Intern/Trainee 
GRADE 3 

Laborer 

GRADE 4 
Clerk Typist 
Cemetery Foreman 
Mini-bus Driver, Council 

on Aging 
Library Assistant 



GRADE 10 

Presently no jobs 

GRADE 11 
Municipal Buildings Custodian 

Administrative Secretary 

Light Equipment Operator 

Senior Dispatcher 

GRADE 12 

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator 

Heavy Equipment Operator 

Water Technician 

Groundskeeper 

GRADE 13 

Equipment Operator Repairman 
Finance/Data Processing 
Supervisor 



GRADE 5 

Executive Director, 
Council on Aging 



GRADE 14 

Council Senior Groundskeeper 

Tree Warden/ Insect Pest Control 

176 



Skilled Laborer 

GRADE 6 

Senior Library Assistant 

Secretary 



Senior Heavy Equipment Operator 

Senior Water Technician 

Senior Wastewater Treatment Operator 



GRADE 15 



GRADE 7 Assistant Wastewater Treatment 

Plant Operator-in-Charge 
Collector/Bookkeeper/Secretary Sr. Equipment Operator 
Police Matron Repairman 

Skating Supervisor GRADE 16 

Traffic Supervisor Presently no jobs. 



GRADE 8 
Presently no jobs 



GRADE 17 

Street/Water/ Sewer Foreman 

Wastewater Treatment Plant 

Operator-in- Charge 



GRADE 9 

Senior Secretary 

Truck Driver GRADE 18 

Special Police Officer 

Permanent Intermittent Senior Wastewater Treatment 

Police Dispatcher Plant Operator-in-Charge 

Call Firefighters Senior Foreman 

SPECIAL RATE/FEE POSITIONS 
PART TIME /TEMPORARY 



Animal Inspector 
Waterfront Director 
Assistant Waterfront Director 

Deputy Collector 
Ambulance E.M.T. 



$1,162 per year 

$3,312 to $4,323 per year 

$206 to $283 per week 

$1,782 minimum per season 

Fee 
$13.52 per hour 



Fire 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Lieutenant 

Clerk 

Fire Alarm Superintendent 

Youth Coordinator 

Police Intern 

Registrar 

Registrar, Clerk 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Counsel 

Tree Climber 

Veteran's Agent 

Inspectors 

Inspector of Buildings 
Local Inspector of Buildings 
Gas Inspector 



$1,761 per year 

$ 605 per year 

$ 448 per year 

$ 448 per year 

$ 448 per year 

$3,744 per year 

$252 to $332 per week 

$338 per year 

$814 per year 

$1,430 per year 

$15,654 to $26,691 per year 

$7.25 to $11.71 per hour 

$4,202 per year 

$16.74 per inspection 

Annual Minimum $3,241. 

Annual Minimum $ 4434. 

Annual Minimum $ 893. 



177 



Assistant Gas Inspector 
Plumbing Inspector 
Assistant Plumbing Inspector 
Wiring Inspector 
Assistant Wiring Inspector 
Health Agent 
Street Inspector 
Zoning Enforcing Officer 



Annual Minimum $ 163. 
Annual Minimum $2,646. 
Annual Minimum $ 607. 
Annual Minimum $1,473. 
Annual Minimum $ 434. 

$16.74 per inspection 
$8.80 per hour 

$16.74 per inspection 



or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Personnel Board) 

VOTE: Voted that the Personnel Administration 
Plan, Classification of Positions and Pay 
Schedules be amended, effective July 1, 1992 
to read as set out in the warrant and to add 
Sergeant after the word Police on the first 
line under the heading POLICE DEPARTMENT 
(Weekly) . 4-28-92 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the town will vote to appropriate 
and/or transfer from available funds sums of money requested 
by the Selectmen or any other Town Officer, Board, 
Commission and Committee to defray operating expenses of the 
Town for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1992, or such 
other sums as the Town may determine as required by General 
Laws, Chapter 41, Section 108, or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 



178 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 









APPROP. 


NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


1992/93 


SCHOOL - 


TOWN 


EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 




155-00 




INSURANCE 




200 




OPERATIONS 


941,883 


156-00 




FEDERAL MANDATES 




200 




OPERATIONS 


95,700 


161-00 




COUNTY RETIREMENT 




200 




OPERATIONS 


445,887 



SUB-TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 

*********************************** 



1,483,470 

********** 



100-01 
100 
200 



SELECTMEN 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



103-00 
100 
200 



104-00 
100 
200 



TAX COLLECTOR 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOWN CLERK 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



2,500 
26.645 





TOTAL 


29,145 


100-03 


TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 




100 


PERSONNEL 


377,498 


200 


OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


1,000 




378,498 


100-04 


TOWN ACCOUNTANT 




100 


PERSONNEL 


31,973 


200 


OPERATIONS 


21,875 




TOTAL 


53,848 


TOTAL 100- 


01,03,04 


461,491 


101-00 


TOWN COUNSEL 




100 


PERSONNEL 





200 


OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


26,060 




26,060 


102-00 


TREASURER/COLLECTOR 




100 


PERSONNEL 


35,721 


200 


OPERATIONS 


36,320 



72,041 



13,519 
1.455 



TOTAL 



14,974 



179 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 









APPROP. 


NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


1992/93 


105-00 


ASSESSORS 






100 


PERSONNEL 




2,700 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


42,215 




44,915 


106-00 


PLANNING BOARD 






200 


OPERATIONS 




18,130 


107-01 


PARK & RECREATION 




100 


PERSONNEL 




33,647 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


23,950 




57,597 


108-00 


ELECTIONS & REGI! 




100 


PERSONNEL 




1,891 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


24,135 




26,026 


109-00 


TOWN HALL 






100 


PERSONNEL 




26,969 


200 


OPERATIONS 




27,910 


500 


EQUIPMENT 











TOTAL 


54,879 


110-04 


HIGHWAY 






100 


PERSONNEL 




314,240 


200 


OPERATIONS 




130,000 






TOTAL 


444,240 


110-05 


SIDEWALKS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




2,350 


110-06 


SNOW & ICE 






100 


PERSONNEL 




56,518 


200 


OPERATIONS 




70,030 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






126,548 


110-07 


TOWN GARAGE 






200 


OPERATIONS 




4,885 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






4,885 


110-08 


EQUIP. REPAIR/MA! 




100 


PERSONNEL 




67,139 


200 


OPERATIONS 




87,218 






TOTAL 


154,357 


110-09 


PUBLIC WORKS UTILITY 




200 


OPERATIONS 




15,000 


TOTAL 110- 


04-04,05,06,07,08,09 


747,380 



180 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 



NUMBER 



DESCRIPTION 



112-01 
100 
200 



112-02 
100 
200 
500 



FIRE ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



TOTAL 



FIRE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 112-01,02 



114-02 
100 
200 



TREE CARE 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



APPROP. 
1992/93 



111-01 
100 
200 


POLICE ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



27,536 


111-02 
100 
200 
500 


TOTAL 
POLICE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 
CRUISER 

OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 
COMMUNICATIONS 
OPERATIONS 


27,536 

815,319 

55,336 




111-03 
200 
500 


870,655 



111-04 
200 






111-05 
200 


TRAFFIC MARKING/SIGN 
OPERATIONS 


7,402 


111-06 
100 
200 


SCHOOL TRAFFIC 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


22,318 
230 




22,548 


TOTAL 111 


■01,02,03,04,05,06 


928,141 



47,703 
3.415 



51,118 

75,997 
38,735 



TOTAL 



114,732 
165.850 



11,262 
11,965 

23,227 



115-00 
100 
200 



NUMBER 



INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 

DESCRIPTION 



34,922 
2,898 



37,820 
APPROP. 
1992/93 



181 



111-01 
100 
200 


POLICE ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 



27,536 


111-02 
100 
200 
500 


TOTAL 
POLICE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 
CRUISER 

OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 
COMMUNICATIONS 
OPERATIONS 


27,536 

815,319 

55,336 




111-03 
200 
500 


870,655 



111-04 
200 






111-05 
200 


TRAFFIC MARKING/SIGN 
OPERATIONS 


7,402 


111-06 
100 
200 


SCHOOL TRAFFIC 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


22,318 
230 




22,548 


TOTAL 111 


-01,02,03,04,05,06 


928,141 


112-01 
100 
200 


FIRE ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


47,703 
3,415 


112-02 
100 
200 
500 


TOTAL 
FIRE OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 


51,118 

75,997 
38,735 




114,732 


TOTAL 112 


■01,02 

TREE CARE 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 


165,850 


114-02 
100 
200 


11,262 
11,965 




23,227 


115-00 
100 
200 


INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


34,922 
2,898 



TOTAL 37,820 



182 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 









APPROP. 


NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


1992/93 


119-00 


SEALER 






100 


PERSONNEL 




1,430 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


199 




1,629 


120-00 


ANIMAL CONTROL 






100 


PERSONNEL 







200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 










121-00 


CIVIL DEFENSE 






200 


OPERATIONS 




1,970 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






1,970 


122-00 


APPEALS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




2,250 


123-00 


STREET LIGHTS 






200 


OPERATIONS 




38,440 


125-00 


BOARD OF HEALTH 




100 


PERSONNEL 




8,352 


200 


OPERATIONS 




16,450 






TOTAL 


24,802 


125-01 


OUTREACH 






100 


PERSONNEL 




26,605 


200 


OPERATIONS 


TOTAL 


1,492 




28,097 


126-00 


PUBLIC HEALTH 






200 


OPERATIONS 




8,230 


128-00 


MENTAL HEALTH 






200 


OPERATIONS 




4,470 


129-00 


AMBULANCE 






100 


PERSONNEL 




31,466 


200 


OPERATIONS 




4,785 


500 


CAPITAL 


TOTAL 






36,251 


130-00 


SOLID WASTE DISPG 




100 


PERSONNEL 




88,410 


200 


OPERATIONS 




63,998 


500 


TIPPING FEE 




323,548 






TOTAL 


475,956 


132-01 


VETERANS OPERATIO 




100 


PERSONNEL 




4,202 


200 


OPERATIONS 




4,598 



TOTAL 8,800 



183 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 



NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


APPROP. 
1992/93 


132-02 
200 


GRAVE MARKERS 
OPERATIONS 


553 


133-00 
200 


MEMORIAL DAY 
OPERATIONS 


592 


134-00 
100 
200 


COUNCIL ON AGING 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


22,611 
6,007 


135-00 
100 
200 
400 


TOTAL 
LIBRARY 

PERSONNEL 

OPERATIONS 

CREDITS 

TOTAL 
CEMETERY COMMISSION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CREDITS 
CAPITAL 


28,618 

114,927 
56,890 


145-00 
100 
200 
400 
500 


171,817 

37,134 

24,630 

(30,000) 


146-00 
200 
400 


TOTAL 
CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
OPERATIONS 
CAPITAL 

TOTAL 
HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
OPERATIONS 


31,764 
1,975 


148-00 
200 


1,975 
600 


150-01 
400 


TOWN DEBT -PR I NCI PAL 
OTHER CHARGES 


465,000 


150-02 
400 


TOWN DEBT- INTEREST 
OTHER CHARGES 


272,409 


TOTAL 150-01,02 


737,409 


160-00 
100 
200 


TOWN REPORT/TOWN MTG 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


1,236 
6,000 




TOTAL 


7,236 


162-00 
200 


STABILIZATION FUND 
OPERATIONS 


50,000 


163-00 
200 


RESERVE FUND 
OPERATIONS 


81,000 


171-00 
200 


WARRANT COMMITTEE 
OPERATIONS 






184 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 



APPROP. 
NUMBER DESCRIPTION 1992/93 



175-00 
100 
200 


PERSONNEL BOARD 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 

SUB TOTAL 


4,860 
227 


TOWN--- 


5,087 
4,426,077 


180-00 
200 

1000 
100 
200 


REGIONAL VOC/TECH 
OPERATIONS 

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
OTHER SCHOOL SERVICES 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 

TOTAL 
PLANT OPERATIONS 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 


49,970 

265,465 
48.267 


2000 
100 
200 


313,732 

6,107,558 
312,720 


3000 
100 
200 


6,420,278 

100,387 
438,546 


4000 
100 
200 


538,933 

387,750 
598,255 



TOTAL 986,005 
7000 ACQUISITION OF EQUIP. 

200 OPERATIONS 19,387 

9000 PROGRAMS/OTHER DISTRICTS 

200 OPERATIONS 179,520 

TOTAL IN TOWN SCHOOLS 1000, 2000, 

3000,4000,7000, 9000 8,457,855 
*********************************** ********** 



185 



ARTICLE 14 - OPERATING BUDGETS 



NUMBER 


DESCRIPTION 


APPROP. 
1992/93 


ENTERPRISE 


FUND OPERATIONS: 




140-00 
100 
200 
400 
500 


WATER DEPARTMENT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
EQUIPMENT 
RESERVE FUND 


143,244 

196,591 



119,297 




TOTAL 


459,132 


131-01 
100 
200 
300 
400 
500 


SEWER DEPARTMENT 
PERSONNEL 
OPERATIONS 
CREDITS 
EQUIPMENT 
RESERVE FUND 


129,997 

199,380 









TOTAL 329,377 

ENTERPRISE FUND • SUB-TOTAL 788,509 

*********************************** ********** 



TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 1,483,470 

TOTAL VOC. TECH SCHOOLS 49,970 

TOTAL WATER & SEWER ENTERPRISE 788,509 

TOTAL IN TOWN SCHOOLS 8,457,855 

TOTAL TOWN 4,426,077 



TOTAL OPERATING BUOGET 15,205,881 

LESS: 
DEBT NOT SUBJECT TO TAX LEVY 442,820 



TOTAL SUBJECT TO LEVY 14,763,061 



186 



VOTE: VOTED unanimously to appropriate $15,147,936. to 
defray the operating expenses of the Town and the 
Water and Sewer Enterprise funds for the fiscal 
year commencing July 1, 1992 and to meet said 
appropriations $14,002,871. be raised from the 
tax levy, other receipts and other revenue 
sources, 

$562,000. be raised from water revenues and 

$562,000. be raised from sewer revenues. 

$ 7,765. be raised from the unexpended balance of 
Article 23, ATM 1991, Memorial Gymnasium Floor 

$ 7,2 00. be raised from the unexpended balance of 
Article 23, ATM 1991, High School Boiler 

$ 6,100. be raised from the unexpended balance of 
Article 17, ATM 1990, Wheelock Gym Wall 

ARTICLE 15. To see what sum the Town will vote to appropriate 
on the Fiscal 1993 tax levy and/or transfer from available 
funds for Capital Expenditures including the following: 



DEPARTMENT 
PLANNING 



PROJECT TITLE 
GIS/CADD MAPPING 



PARK & RECREATION 



RESURFACE METACOMET TENNIS COURT 
DREDGING BAKER'S POND 



TOWN HALL 



HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBILITY 
PAINT EXTERIOR TOWN HALL 



HIGHWAY 



WHEELCHAIR RAMPS 

VARIOUS DRAINAGE PROJECTS 

SURFACE PHILIP STREET 

RESURFACE SUB-DIVISIONS 



DPW EQUIPMENT 
POLICE 



EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT 

FIREARM REPLACEMENT 

CRUISER REPLACEMENT 

COMPUTER 

POLICE/ FIRE BUILDING RENOVATIONS 



FIRE 



SCBA FILL/PURIFICATION SYSTEM 

LARGE DIAMETER HOSE 

FIRE APPARATUS 



SOLID WASTE 



RECYCLING EQUIPMENT 
COMPREHENSIVE SITE ASSESSMENT 



LIBRARY 
CEMETERY 



DESIGN AND INSTALL ELEVATOR 
TRUCK REPLACEMENT 



187 



SCHOOL WEATHERSTRIP DOORS 

REFURBISH HIGH SCHOOL GYM 

TRACTOR REPLACEMENT 

ASBESTOS ABATEMENT 

GAS CONVERSION /DALE ST. SCHOOL 

GAS CONVERSION/MIDDLE SCHOOL 

and that the Board of Selectmen and/ or the School Committee 
be further authorized to contract with and otherwise treat 
with any federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the 
cost of any capital expenditures; and that the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee respectively be 
authorized to trade or sell toward part of the purchase 
price, the following: 
Trade or sell: 



DEPARTMENT 
POLICE 



TRADE IN OR SELL 

1988 FORD POLICE CRUISER 

1989 FORD POLICE CRUISER 



HIGHWAY 



1984 CHEVROLET PICKUP TRUCK 
1986 CHEVROLET PICKUP TRUCK 



CEMETERY 1982 PICKUP TRUCK 

SCHOOL 19 69 INT. HARVESTER TRACTOR 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Capital Budget Committee) 



DEPARTMENT 
PLANNING 
PARC & REC. 

TOWN HALL 

HIGHWAY 



POLICE 



FIRE 



SOLID WASTE 

LIBRARY 

CEMETERY 

SCHOOL 



PROJECT TITLE 

GIS/CADD MAPPING 

RESURF TENNIS COURTS 

DREDGING BAKERS POND 

HANDICAPPED ACCESS* 

PAINT EXTERIOR 

WHEELCHAIR RAMPS 

VARIOUS DRAINAGE 

RESURFACE SUBDIVISIONS 

SURFACE PHILIP STREET 

EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT 

FIREARM REPLACEMENT 

CRUISER REPLACEMENT 

POLICE/ FIRE BLDG. RENOV. 

COMPUTER 

AIR/FILL/PURIFICATION 

LARGE DIAMETER HOSE 

FIRE PUMPER 

RECYCLING EQUIPMENT 

LANDFILL SITE ASSESSMENT 

DESIGN & INSTALL ELEVATO! 

TRUCK REPLACEMENT (HWY) 

WATHERSTRIP DOORS 

ASBESTOS ABATEMENT 

GAS CONV/MIDDLE SCHOOL 

REFURBISH HIGH SCHOOL GYM 14,720 



REOUEST 


RECOMMEND 


$50,000. 


$ 0. 


0. 


0. 


10,000. 


10,000. 


5,000. 


10,000. 


8,000. 


0. 


5,400. 


5,400. 


15,000. 


15,000. 


35,000. 


35,000. 


25,120. 


15,616. 


58,000. 


40,000. 


22,318. 


15,660. 


31,584. 


31,584. 


15,000. 


15,000. 


50,000. 


0. 


9,200. 


25,000. 


10,000. 


0. 


48,500. 


48,500. 


41,406. 


41,406. 


20,000. 


0. 


* 7,500. 


0. 


0. 


0. 


5,400. 


5,400. 


24,350. 


24,350. 


33,000. 


33,000. 


: 14,720. 


14,720. 



188 



TRACTOR REPLACEMENT 
GAS CONV/DALE STREET 



TOTALS 



23,000. 
29,500. 

$596,998. 



23,000 
0. 

$403,236 



♦Combine into one townwide handicapped access study. 

VOTE; Voted that the following sums 
appropriated for capital expenditures: 



be 



Pare & Rec. 
Town Hall 
Highway- 



Police 



Fire 

Solid Waste 
School 



Dredging Bakers Pond $ 10,000. 

Handicapped Access 10,000. 

Wheelchair Ramps 5,400. 

Various Drainage 15,000. 

Resurface Subdivisions 35,000. 

Surface Philip Street 15,616. 

Equipment Replacement 40,000. 

Firearm Replacement 15,660. 

Cruiser Replacement 31,584. 

Police/Fire Bldg. Renov. 15,000. 

Air Fill. Purification 25,000. 

Fire Pumper 48,500. 

Recycling Equipment 41,406. 

Gas Conv/Middle School 33,000. 

Refurbish High School Gym 14,720. 

Tractor Replacement 23,000. 

Asbestos Abatement 24 . 350 . 

$ 403,236. 



and that the Board of Selectmen and/or School Committee be 
authorized to contract with and otherwise treat with any 
federal and state agencies for reimbursement of the cost of 
any capital expenditures; and that the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee be authorized to trade or sell 
toward part of the purchase price. 



Department 

Police 

Highway 

Cemetery 
School 



Trade in or Sell 

1988 Ford Police Cruiser 

1989 Ford Police Cruiser 
1984 Chevrolet Pickup Truck 
1986 Chevrolet Pickup Truck 

1982 Pickup Truck 
1969 Int. Harvester Tractor 



and that to meet this appropriation $ 403,236. 
the 1993 tax levy. 



be raised on 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote pursuant to Chapter 
59, Section 5, Clause 41A, property tax deferral, to 
increase the maximum amount of gross receipts a taxpayer may 
have to qualify for a property tax deferral from $2 0,000. to 
a maximum of $40,000. and to become effective for Fiscal 
1993, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted that the Town increase the maximum 
amount of gross receipts a taxpayer may have 
to qualify for a property tax deferral under 

189 



Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, 
Section 5, Clause 41A from $ 20,000. to a 
maximum of $3 0,000. 

Vote of hands: YES 795 NO 267 
4-27-92 

ARTICLE 17 To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 494 of the Acts of 1989 amending 
General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 50, providing for 
a property tax exemption for certain improvements made to 
residential property to provide for persons over sixty (60) 
years old, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

VOTE: Voted to dismiss this article. 4/28/92 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Map so that the boundary of the Aquifer: Zone 1 includes a 
circular area with a 2,000 foot radius from proposed Well #6 
as shown on a plan by Amory Engineers, P.C., Duxbury, 
Massachusetts, entitled "Department of Public Works, 
Medfield, Massachusetts, W.M.A. Permit Application No. 
9P3-3-20-175.02, THEIS 2D Analysis, Proposed Well No. 6, 
Cumulative Drawdown Contours, Drawing No. 531, Sheet 2 Of 
2," part of the Addendum to said Permit Application, dated 
July 1991, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that the Zoning Map be 
amended as set out in the warrant. 
4/28/92 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 13.5.1 by deleting the wording "one-third of 
the area of the window in which they appear." and 
substituting therefor "one-third of the total area of 
exterior street side windows." or do or act anything in 
relation thereto. 

(Planning Board) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that Section 13.5.1 of 
the Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out 
in the warrant. 4/27/92 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section 14.10, by deleting the present language and 
substituting therefor the following: 

"14.10 SPECIAL PERMITS BY BOARD OF APPEALS 

Certain uses, structures or conditions are designated as SP 
in Section 5, paragraph 5.4 Table of Use Regulations. These 
uses require a Special Permit from the Board of Appeals which 
may be obtained only by use of the following procedure. 
Special permits required by Sectiion 7 - Open Space 
Residential Zoning, Section 10 - Flood Plain District and 

190 



Section 11 - Watershed Protection District shall be exempt 
from the provisions of this Section 14.10 and shall be 
governed by the provisions of Sections 7 , 10 and 11 of this 
Bylaw." 

or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

VOTE: Voted unanimously that Section 14.10 of the 
Zoning Bylaw be amended as set out in the 
warrant. 4/27/92 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw, Section SECTION 5 - USE REGULATIONS by deleting 
Paragraph 5.3.9 as it presently appears and by substituting 
therfor the following: 

"5.3.9 Day Care facilities for the day care of more 
than six children in Residential Districts shall 
conform with the following standards: 

5. 3. 9. a. That the minimum lot area be 40,000 square 
feet or such greater area as is required by Table 6.2; 



5.3.9.b. That the minimum yards be as follows: 
Front Yard 3 feet 
Side Yard 20 feet 
Rear Yard 50 feet 

or such greater yards as are required by Table 6.2; 

5.3.9.C. That buffers meeting the specifications set 
out in Section 6.2.10 be provided along side 
and rear yards; 

5,3.9.d. That there be an on-site drop-off area 
capable of accomodating at least a number of 
vehicles equal to one fourth the licensed 
capacity of the facility. 

5.3.9.e. "That there be a separate entrance and exit 
for vehicles. " 

5.3.9.f. That a day care facility shall not be 
considered to be a community facility for 
the purpose of Section 6. 3.1. a. and shall be 
subject to the Height and Bulk Regulations 
of Table 63. 

and amend Section 5.4.2.12 TABLE OF USE 
REGULATIONS by removing "(See Section 
5.3.9)" from the first line and by changing 
5. 4. 2. 12. b. to read as follows: 

"b. more than six children " (See Section 
5.3.9) or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Planning Board) 



91 



VOTE: Voted uanimously that Section 5 - Use 
Regulations of the Zoning Bylaw be amended 
as set out in the warrant. 4-28-92 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum 
of money for remodeling, reconstructing and constructing ad- 
ditions to the Medfield High School, including equipment and 
related site improvements; to determine whether this 
appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise; or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(School Planning and Building Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that $6,900,000. is appropriated for 
remodeling, reconstructing and constructing 
additions to the Medfield High School, 
including equipment and related site 
improvements; that to meet this 
appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to 
borrow $6,9000,000. under General Laws 
chapter 44, Section 7 or Chapter 645 of the 
Acts of 1948 as amended; and that the School 
Building and Planning Committee is 
authorized to take any other action 
necessary to carry out this project; 
provided, however, that this vote shall not 
take effect until the Town votes to exempt 
from the limitation on total taxes imposed 
by General Laws chapter 59, Section 21C 
(Proposition 2 1/2) amounts required to pay 
the principal of and interest on the 
borrowing authorized by this vote. 

VOTE: YES 866 
NO 148 

ARTICLE 23. To see what sum of money the town will vote to 
transfer from the Wetlands Protection Fee Fund and 
appropriate for the use of the Conservation Commission to 
complete project reviews and to issue regulatory decisions 
within required timeframes, including but not limited to the 
costs of engaging consultant and technical assistance for 
project reviews and administrative and clerical costs 
associated with processing the application and decision, or 
do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to appropriate the sum of 
$4,452.50 to the Wetlands Protection Fund 
for the use of the Conservation Commission 
in carrying out its duties under the 
provisions of the Wetlands Protection Act. 

4/27/92 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the town will vote to delete ARTICLE 
IX WETLANDS from the Bylaws as now printed and substitute 
therefor a new ARTICLE IX - WETLANDS, the full text of 
which is available for examination at the Town Hall or 
Public Library, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

192 



(Conservation Commission) 

VOTE: Voted that Article 24 be dismissed. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Procurement Officer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to award a contract or contracts to dispose of 
recyclable materials for periods up to and including twenty 
years, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that the Procurement Officer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, be 
authorized to award a contract or contracts 
to dispose of recyclable materials for 
periods up to and including twenty years. 

4-27-92 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to approve an 
amendment to the TRANSFER STATION REGULATIONS and authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to insert under VIOLATIONS after the 
first paragraph, which will be identified as paragraph (1) 
an additional paragraph as follows: 

(2) On or after July 1, 1992, any person violating 
Section D. 4. and, or F. 4. of these regulations 
shall be subject to a fine of not more than 
twenty-five dollars ($25.00) for each offense. In 
addition, the Town of Medfield reserves the right 
to refuse to allow disposal of refuse in the Town 
of Medfield Transfer Station where an individual 
fails to adhere to the spirit or letter of these 
regulations, or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Recycling Committee) 

VOTE: Voted that an amendment to the TRANSFER 
STATION REGULATIONS be approved by inserting 
under VIOLATIONS an additional paragraph as 
follows: 

(2) On or after July 1, 1992, any person violating 
Section D. 4. and, or F4 . of these regulations 
shall be subject to a fine of not more than 
twenty-five dollars ($25.00) for each offense. 
In addition, the Town of Medfield reserves the 
right to refuse to allow disposal of refuse in 
the Town of Medfield Transfer Station where an 
individual fails to adhere to the spirit or 
letter of these regulations, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. 

(Recycling Committee) 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, or otherwise, 
certain parcels of land belonging to the Trustees of 
Reservations and certain drain easements and slope 
easements on Noon Hill Street in the vicinity of Holt's Pond; 
and to transfer certain other parcels of land in the same 
area to the jurisdiction of the Selectmen and to authorize 

193 



the Selectmen to convey those parcels to the Trustees of 
Reservations for the sum of one dollar; all for the purpose 
of constructing a drainage culvert and appurtenant drainage 
from Holt's Pond under Noon Hill Street and for realigning 
Noon Hill Street as laid out by the Selectmen, all as shown 
on a plan of Noon Hill Street, prepaid by the Norfolk 
County Engineering Department, which is on file with the 
Town Clerk; and to see what sum the Town will vote to 
appropriate for the purposes of this article, or do or act 
anything in relation thereto. (Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted unanimously to authorize the Selectmen 
to acquire by eminent domain, or otherwise, 
certain parcels of land belonging to the 
Trustees of Reservations and certain drain 
easements and slope easements on Noon Hill 
Street in the vicinity of Holt's Pond; and 
to transfer certain other parcels of land in 
the same area to the jurisdiction of the 
Selectmen and to authorize the Selectmen to 
convey those parcels to the Trustees of 
Reservations for the sum of one dollar; 
all for the purpose of constructing a 
drainage culvert and appurtenant drainage 
from Holt's Pond under Noon Hill Street and 
for realigning Noon Hill Street as laid out 
by the Selectmen, all as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan of Land Noon Hill Street, 
Medfield, Proposed Acquisition for Highway 
Purposes at Proposed Culvert Replacement", 
dated September 23, 1991, prepared by the 
Norfolk County Engineering Department, and 
that the sume of one dollar ($1.00) be 
appropriated for the purposes of this 
article. 4-27-92 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to delete the 
language of ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS, SECTION 11, and 
substitute the following: 

"No person shall fire or discharge or shoot any 
firearm, rifle or shot gun as defined in the Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 140, Section 121 as may be amended from 
time to time or any bow drawn, held or released by mechanical 
means in the Town of Medfield; but to the extent not 
otherwise prohibited by law, the provisions of this section 
shall not apply to the discharge of firearms rifles or 
shotguns: 



in the lawful defense of the person, or 

for the human dispatch of injured 
animals, or 



3. 



4. 



by any person lawfully on a target, trap 
or skeet range established for such 
purposes, or 

by any duly authorized peace officer 
acting in the proper performance of 

194 



duty , or 

5. by any duly authorized military 
personnel participating in scheduled 
military exercises, or 

6. by any person using blank cartridges in 
theatrical performances or sporting 
events, or including pre-competition 
training or as authorized by the Town 
during the celebration of Federal or 
State Holiday 

7. by an owner or tenant of land (or if 
authorized by either, any member of the 
immediate family or person permanently 
employed by such owner of tenant) but 
only upon such land and for the limited 
purposes of a. shooting a bird or other 
animal found to be damaging or posing 
the imminent threat of damage to the 
property of such person or persons, and 
b. shooting domestic animals raised as 
livestock. 

There shall be a penalty for breach hereof not exceeding $3 00 
for each offense." or do or act anything in relation 
thereto. 

(Board of Selectmen) 

VOTE: Voted that ARTICLE IV. POLICE 
REGULATIONS, SECTION 11, of the 
BYLAWS 

4-28-92 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to delete the 
language of ARTICLE IV. POLICE REGULATIONS, SECTION 11 and 
substitute the following: 

"No person shall discharge any firearms in the Town of 
Medfield without a permit for discharging firearms from the 
Medfield Police Chief or his designee. No person shall hunt, 
or fire or discharge any firearm on any private property un- 
less they have on their person written permission from the 
owner or legal occupant thereof. This Bylaw shall not apply 
to the lawful defense of life or property, or to any law en- 
forcement officer acting in the discharge of his duties. 

1. The permit for discharging firearms within the 
Town of Medfield must be renewed annually for 
a period ending December 31 each year. 

2. Fees not to exceed $10, as set by the Board of 
Selectmen, shall be charged for the permit. 

3. Along with the permit, the Town shall issue a 
sticker or decal to be affixed to the motor 
vehicle that the permittee will use to drive 
to public land to discharge firearms. 

195 



4. Each person discharging a firearm in Medfield 
shall display his Town permit. 

5. If any permittee violates any Town bylaw or 
regulation on the discharge of firearms, his 
permit shall be suspended for the remainder of 
the year of his permit and the following year. 

6. Violators of any Town bylaws or regulations on 
the discharge of firearms shall be subject to 
the maximum allowable penalty, including being 
required to surrender the firearm and, upon 
conviction, to forfeit it. 

7. Town officials shall enforce strictly all Town 
bylaws, and regulations on discharging 
firearms. 

8. The Town shall post on certain roads, 
including but not limited to Route 27 at the 
Sherborn and Walpole borders, Route 109 at the 
Dover and Millis borders, Pine Street and 
North Street at the Dover border, South 
Street, Causeway Street, Orchard Street, Noon 
Hill Road, and such other roads as designated 
by the Board of Selectmen, signs stating: 

'NO SHOOTING WITHOUT PERMIT 
$500 FINE 
INQUIRE AT POLICE STATION' 

9. No permit shall be required from the Town of 
Medfield, to hunt on property owned or managed 
by the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife or 
Department of Environmental Management or 
their successors. 

10. Penalty for violation of any provision of this 
section shall be $500 for each offense. 

11. The invalidity, unconstitutionally or 
illegality of any section of this Bylaw shall 
not have any effect upon the validity, 
constitutionality or legality of any other 
section. " 

and to see what sum the Town will appropriate for the 
purchase and installation of signs and/or the issuance of 
permits as required by the provisions of this bylaw, 
determine in what manner the funds shall be raised or do or 
act anything in relation thereto. 

(Petition) 
This Article was dismissed. 4-28-92 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Assessors to use a sum of money from Free Cash in 
the Treasury for the reduction of the Tax Rate for Fiscal 
1993, or do or act anything in relation thereto. 

(Board of Assessors) 

196 



VOTE: VOTED that the Town authorize the Board 
of Assessors to use $357,765. from Free 
Cash in the Treasury for the reduction 
of the Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1993. 

(Board of Assessors) 
Meeting was dissolved at 10:45 P.M. 



Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 



197 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION 
June 9, 1992 



Norfolk, ss, 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield in 
said County, greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth, you are directed to 
notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, 
qualified to vote in elections and in Town affairs, to meet 
at the Memorial School, in said Medfield, on Tuesday, the 
Ninth day of June, A.D., 1992 at 6:00 o'clock A.M. 

RECALL ELECTION 

To cast their votes in the recall election either for or 
against the recall of three School Committee members: 

Robert A. Kinsman - Unexpired Term to March 28, 1993 
F. Paul Quatromoni - Unexpired Term to March 28, 1993 
Teresa A. Fannin - Unexpired Term to March 27, 1993 

and further for the election of three School Committee 
members to fill vacancies in the event said recall 
prevails. 

PROPOSITION 2-1/2 DEBT SERVICE EXEMPTION QUESTION 

Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt from the 
provisions of proposition two and one half, so-called, the 
amounts required to pay for the bonds to be issued in order 
to remodel, reconstruct and construct additions to Medfield 
High School, including equipment and related site 
improvements? 

Polls will be open from 6:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an 
attested copy thereof, in the usual place for posting 
warrants in said Medfield, 14 days at least before the time 
of holding said election. 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and place 
of election aforesaid. Given unto our hands this twentieth 
day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand Nine Hundred 
and Ninety-two. 

John F. Ganley 

Harold F. Pritoni, Jr. 

Ann B. Thompson 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



198 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
RECALL ELECTION 
JUNE 9, 1992 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened 
at 6:00 AM with reading of the warrant and the swearing in 
of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen 
ballots posted, voting list was displayed and instruction 
to the voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

WARDEN: Elmer 0. Portman, Jr. 

CLERKS: Precinct 1. Mary MairEtienne, Dorothea A. 
Gaughran 

Precinct 2. Nancy Frank, Priscilla Anderson 

Precinct 3. Anna Murphy, Gail Rad 

Precinct 4. Katherine Buchanan, Phyllis 
Wilmarth 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabelle Maguire, Gail Rad, Katherine 
Buchanan, Margaret O'Brien, Priscilla Anderson, Anna 
Murphy, Patricia Rioux, Sadie Carson, Dorothy Sumner, 
George Mentzer, Ann Mentzer, Elton Bassett, Frances 
Colella, Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lordan, Nancy Frank, 
Mary MairEtienne, Emmy Mitchell, Nancy Preston, Phyllis 
Wilmarth, David Wilmarth, Clara Doub, Eva Grover, Jessie 
Portman, Elmer Portman, Ronald Rioux, Dorcas Owen, 
Marguerite Eppich, Georgia Colivas, Edith Fernald, Maureen 
McNeil, Marilyn Hapenney 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 3,064. Absentees Ballots 24. 
Total Registered Voters were 6,472, 21% of the voters 
voting. 

For the RECALL of ROBERT A. KINSMAN, School Committee, 
unexpired term to March 28, 1993: 1,699 AGAINST the 
RECALL: 1,213 Blanks 152 

For the RECALL of TERESA A. FANNIN, School Committee, 
unexpired term to March 27, 1994: 1,793 AGAINST the 
RECALL: 1,092 Blanks 179 

CANDIDATES - FOR SCHOOL COMMITTEE, unexpired term to 
March 28, 1993: 

ROBERT A. KINSMAN: 886 (Candidate for Re-election) 
SARAH F. SCHMID: 761 

CLARENCE A. PURVIS: 1,134 
BLANKS: 279 

SCATTERED : 4 

CANDIDATES - FOR SCHOOL COMMITTEE, unexpired term to 

199 



March 27, 1994: 

WILLIAM A. TOSCHES 1,184 

MARK H. KAIZERMAN SC4 

TERESA A. FANNIN 768 (Candidate for Re-election) 

BLANKS 306 

SCATTERED 2 

for the RECALL of F. PAUL QUATROMONI, School Committee, 
unexpired term to March 28, 1992: 1,2 62 AGAINST: 1,609 
BLANKS: 193 

CANDIDATES - FOR SCHOOL COMMITTEE, unexpired term to March 
28, 1993: 

SHARON K. SEMERARO 1,177 

F. PAUL QUATROMONI 1,462 (Candidate for Re-election) 

BLANKS 422 

SCATTERED 3 

QUESTION: Shall the Town of Medfield be allowed to exempt 
from the provisions of proposition two and one half, 
so-called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds to be 
issued in order to remodel, reconstruct and construct 
additions to Medfield High School, including equipment and 
related site improvements? 



YES 


1,967 


NO 


1,073 


BLANKS 


24 



And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting an at- 
tested copy thereof in the usual place for posting warrants 
in said Medfield, seven days at least before the time of 
holding said meeting. 

HEREOF FAIL NOT, and make due return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon, unto the Town Clerk at the time and 
place of meeting, aforesaid. Given under our hand this 
twentieth day of May in the year of our Lorn One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Ninety- two. 



Ann B. Thompson, Chairman 
John F. Ganley, Clerk 
Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Chairman 
SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

Norfolk, ss. 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of the same at five public 
places seven days before the date of the meeting, as within 
directed. 



Constable of Medfield 
Date 



200 



::.:". : ir:-: z? yj-.sskzyrsszzzs 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

WARRANT FOR STATE PRIMARY 
SepterLber 15, 1992 

Norfolk SS. 

To either of th Constables of the Town of Medf ield 

GREETINGS : 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required zo 

notify =r.i warn the inhabitants of said town who are 

r-=Lifiei iz vote in Elections ro vote at Precincts i, 2, 

3, 4 at the Memorial School Gymnasium on TUESDAY, the 
FIFTEENTH DAY OF SEPTEMBER 1992 from 6:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 
for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates 
of political parties for the following offices: 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS FOR THE 9TH 

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

COUNCILLOR FOR THE 2ND 

COUNCILLOR DISTRICT 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT FOR THE 1ST SUFFOLK & 

NORFOLK SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT . . FOR THE 13TH NORFOLK 

?i??isi tat: z ::st?::t 

SHERIFF FOR NORFOLK COUNTY 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER FOR NORFOLK COUNTY 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 25th day of August 1992. 

S/ John F. Ganley, Chairman 

S/ Harold F. Priotoni, Jr., Clerk 

S/ Ann B. Thompson, Member 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 

By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants oF the Town of Medf ield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for thepurpose named, by 
posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 
five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven 
days before the time of holding the meeting. 



Kevin W. Robinson, Const at 1< 
August 31, 1992 



201 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
STATE PRIMARY 
SEPTEMBER 18, 1992 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 
6:00 a.m. with reading of the warrant and the swearing in of 
the election workers present. The ballot boxes were inspected 
and found to be in working order, specimen ballots posted, 
voting list was displayed and instruction to the voters were 
posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

Elmer Portman, Warden 

Anna Murphy, Clerk 

BALLOT COUNTERS: Mabelle Maguire, Gail Rad, Margaret O'Brien, 
Anna Murphy, Sadie Carson, Dorothy Sumner, Dorothea Gaughran, 
Elizabeth Lordan, Nancy Franke, Mary MairEtienne, Emmy 
Mitchell, Phyllis Wilmarth, David Wilmarth, Clara Doub, Eva 
Grover, Joan Bussow. 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 1,652. There are 6,472 registered voters. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results 
were as follows: 

DEMOCRATIC BALLOT TOTAL 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, VOTE FOR ONE 

John J. Moakley 691 

Blanks 268 

959 

COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 

Edward P. Foley 290 

Howard M. Kahalas 226 

Joseph M. Mahaney 187 

Blanks 256 

959 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 

Maura H. Casey 3 08 

Sean P. Teehan 299 

Marian Walsh 342 

Blanks 10 

959 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 

Lida Harkins 732 

Blanks 227 

959 

SHERIFF, VOTE FOR ONE 

Clifford H. Marshall 617 

Blanks 342 

959 



202 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR ONE 
Peter H. Collins 
John Gillis 
William P. O'Donnell 
John F. Youngclaus 
Blanks 



REPUBLICAN BALLOT 

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, VOTE FOR ONE 
Martin D. Conboy 
Patrick J. Walsh 
Blanks 



TOTAL 

194 

169 

38 

401 



COUNCILLOR, VOTE FOR ONE 
Michael M, Murphy 
Jerrald M. Vengrow 
Blanks 



214 

137 

50 

401 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 
Christopher M. Lane 
Blanks 



370 

31 

401 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, VOTE FOR ONE 
Jeffrey M. East 
Blanks 



337 

64 
401 



SHERIFF, VOTE FOR ONE 
Paul F. Kelly 
Blanks 



330 

71 

401 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, VOTE FOR NOT MORE THAN TWO 
Robert A. Frazier 
James G. Mullen, Jr. 
Blanks 



282 
253 

267 
802 



After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk for 
safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



/s/Nancy J. Preston, 
TOWN CLERK 



203 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MICHAEL J. CONNOLLY, SECRETARY 

SS. 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Medfield 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to 

notify and warn the inhabitants of said town who are 

qualified to vote in Elections to vote at Precincts: 

1, 2, 3, 4, 

MEMORIAL SCHOOL 

on TUESDAY, THE THIRD DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1992 from 6:00 a.m. to 
8:00 p.m. for the following purpose: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the candidates 
of political parties for the following offices: 

ELECTORS OF THE PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT FOR THE 

COMMONWEALTH 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 9th CONGRESSIONAL 

DISTRICT 
COUNCILLOR 2nd COUNCILLOR 

DISTRICT 
SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 1st Suffolk & Norfolk 

Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT... 13th Norfolk Representative 

District 

COUNTY SHERIFF Norfolk County 

COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Norfolk County 

COUNTY CHARTER COMMISSION Bristol Nantucket & Norfolk 

County 

QUESTIONS 

#1 - Tax on Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco 

#2 - Public Reporting of Corporate Tax Information 

#3 - Requiring Reduced, Reusable or Recyclable Packaging 

#4 - Tax on Oils and Hazardous Materials 

#5 - Charter Commission for Norfolk County 

LOCAL AND PUBLIC POLICY QUESTIONS 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your 
doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 

Given under our hand this 2 0th day of October, 1992 

8/ John F. Ganley, Chairman 

8/ Harold F. Pritoni, Jr., Clerk 

8/ Ann B. Thompson, Member 

SELECTMEN OF MEDFIELD 



By virtue of this warrant, I have notified and warned the 
inhabitants of the Town of Medfield, qualified to vote in 
elections, to meet at the time and for the purpose named, 
by posting attested copies of said warrant in not less than 

204 



five public places in the Town of Medfield at least seven 
days before the time of holding the meeting. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



/s/Nancy J. Preston, 

TOWN CLERK 



/S/ KEVIN W. ROBINSON, Constable October 21, 1992 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION 

November 3, 1992 

Pursuant to the foregoing warrant, the polls were opened at 
6:00 A.M. with the reading of the warrant and the swearing in 
of the election workers present. The ballot boxes were 
inspected and found to be in working order, specimen ballots 
posted, voting list was displayed and instructions to the 
voters were posted. 

The following workers were assigned to their precincts: 

WARDEN: Elmer Portmann, Nancy Franke 

PRECINCT 1: Mary MairEtienne Mabelle Maguire Clerk, 
Dorothea Gaughran, Elizabeth Lordan, David 
Wilmarth 

PRECINCT 2: Beverly Hallowell, Eva Grover Clerk, 
Priscilla Anderson, Emmy Mitchell, Anna 
Floser 

PRECINCT 3: Anna Murphy, Clerk, Kurt Preston, 

Gail Rad, Dorothy Sumner, Sadie Carson 

PRECINCT 4: C. B. Doub, Marshall Chick, Phyllis 

Wilmarth, Barbara Connors, Joan Bussow 

The polls were closed at 8:00 P.M. 

The total vote was 6352, including 375 absentee ballots. 
Total registered voters numbered 6944, 91% of voters voting. 

After the counting and tabulation of the ballots, the results 
were as follows: 



ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE PRESIDENT, Vote for One 
Bush and Quayle 
Clinton and Gore 

205 



PRECINCT 








1 2 


3 


4 


TOTAL 


581 590 


662 


669 


2502 


588 579 


671 


619 


2457 



Fulani and Munoz 
Hagelin and Tompkins 
LaRouche, Jr. and Bevel 
Marrou and Lord 
Perot and Stockdale 
Phillips and Knight, Jr 
Blanks 












1 


1 


1 


1 








2 








1 





1 


2 


9 


2 


3 


16 


329 


308 


377 


326 


1340 


2 











2 


12 


1 


12 


6 


31 



1515 1488 1725 1624 



6352 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS, Vote for One 
Ninth District 



John Joseph Moakley 


734 


755 


850 


761 


3100 


Martin D. Conboy 


528 


497 


636 


640 


2301 


Robert W. Horan 


65 


44 


47 


47 


203 


Lawrence C. Mackin 


74 


67 


60 


54 


255 


Blanks 


114 


125 


132 


122 


493 




1515 


1488 


1725 


1624 


6352 



COUNCILLOR, Vote for One 

Second District 
Michael M. Murphy 
Edward P. Foley 
Blanks 



719 


714 


862 


856 


559 


540 


623 


548 


237 


234 


240 


220 



1515 1488 1725 1624 



3151 

2270 

931 

6352 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for One 

First Suffolk & Norfolk District 
Christopher M. Lane 968 940 1075 1061 

Marian Walsh 486 494 596 510 

Blanks _61 _54 _54 _53 

1515 1488 1725 1624 



4044 

2086 

222 

6352 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT, Vote for One 
Thirteenth Norfolk District 
Lida Harkins 851 863 994 940 

Jeffrey M. East 528 521 597 563 

Richard E. Jones 56 33 42 29 

Blanks _80 _71 _92 92 

1515 1488 1725 1624 



3648 

2209 

160 

335 

6352 



SHERIFF, Vote for One 

Norfolk County 
Clifford H. Marshall 
Paul F. Kelly 
Blanks 



560 541 646 587 

749 740 845 833 

206 207 234 204 

1515 1488 1725 1624 



2334 

3167 

851 

6352 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER, Vote for Two 
Norfolk County 
Robert A. Frazier 
John Gillis 
James G. Mullen, Jr. 
William P. O'Donnell 
James B. Geary 
Paul R. Seaman 



Blanks 



569 


549 


698 


670 


361 


326 


411 


346 


427 


456 


526 


570 


500 


491 


561 


491 


50 


51 


34 


56 


186 


181 


245 


203 



937 922 975 912 
3030 2976 3450 3248 



2486 

1444 

1979 

2043 

191 

815 

3746 

12704 



NORFOLK COUNTY CHARTER COMMISSION, Vote for One 
Eleventh Norfolk 

206 



Marcia M. Carleton 


578 


572 


626 


641 


2417 


Robert D. Hall 


355 


344 


410 


350 


1459 


Blanks 


581 


572 


689 


633 


2474 


Scattered 


1 


1 








2 



1515 1489 1725 1624 



6352 



QUESTION 1 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote 
was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 
before May 6, 1992? Health Protection Fund relating to 
tobacco use. 

YES 

NO 

BLANKS 



978 
522 

15 



894 

575 

19 



1141 1012 
562 592 



22 



20 



1515 1488 1725 1625 



4023 
2251 
76 
6350 



QUESTION 2 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, on which no vote 
was taken by the Senate or the House of Representatives 
before May 6, 1992? Certain Banks, Insurance Companies and 
publicly-traded corporations to file annual reports with 
the Massachusetts Secretary of State listing information 
from their state tax returns, etc. 

YES 811 767 923 

NO 557 615 655 

BLANKS 147 106 147 



1515 1488 1725 



858 

630 

136 

1624 



3359 

2457 

536 



6352 



QUESTION 3 

Do you approve of a law that would require all packaging used 
in Massachusetts on or after July 1, 199 6 to be reduced in 
size, reusable, or made of materials that have been or could 
be recycled? 

YES 705 608 828 763 2904 

NO 787 859 871 833 3350 

BLANKS _23 _21 _26 _28 98 

1515 1488 1725 1624 6352 



QUESTION 4 

Do you approve of a law that would impose an excise tax on 
oil, toxic chemicals, and other hazardous substances, and 
would direct that money raised, along with the fees paid by 
transporters and specific revenues under 
be deposited in the state Environmental 



hazardous waste 
other state laws 
Challenge Fund? 

YES 

NO 

BLANKS 



652 
792 
755 



601 

832 

64 



739 

922 

52 



2199 1497 1713 



673 

899 

242 

1814 



2665 

3445 

6352 

12462 



QUESTION 5 

Do you approve of a charter study commission to be created to 

study the present government structure of Norfolk County, 

to consider and make findings concerning the form of 
government and make recommendations thereon? 

YES 648 648 791 770 2857 

NO 704 680 759 697 2840 

BLANKS 163 160 175 157 655 

1515 1488 1725 1624 6352 



207 



BALLOT COUNTERS: Elmer Portmann, Nancy Franke, Warden and 
Clerk. Patricia Rioux, Ronald Rioux, Georgia Colivas, George 
Mentzer, Ann Mentzer, Frances Colella, Dorcas Owen, 
Marguerite Eppich, Michelle Mitchell, Janice Maguire, Donna 
Hesnan, Maureen McNeal, Marilyn Hapenny, Barbara Armstrong, 
Claire Bouin, Ruth Brewer, Claire DeVasto, Jane Rezza, and 
Norma Matzack. 

After the results were announced, the ballots, checked voting 
lists and tally sheets were turned over to the Town Clerk 
for safekeeping as prescribed by law. 

A TRUE COPY ATTEST: 



/s/Nancy J. Preston 
TOWN CLERK 




Town Clerk Nancy J. Preston 



208 



FINANCIAL REPORTS 

TOWN OF MEDFIELD 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1992 



209 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Comparative Financial Report 
1991, 1992, 1993 



1991 





CLASS 


PARCEL COUNT 


1) 


Residential 


3469 


2) 


Open Space 


205 


3) 


Commercial 


154 


4) 


Industrial 


50 


5) 


Personal Property 


160 


Total 


Real and Personal 


4038 



VALUATION 

781,815,650.00 

7,578,100.00 

39,364,750.00 

25,506,000.00 

7,112,040.00 

861,376,540.00 

Tax Levy 10,412,292.46 

Overlay 92,809.46 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 12 . 08 



1992 



1) 


Residential 


3506 


2) 


Open Space 


190 


3) 


Commercial 


148 


4) 


Industrial 


50 


5) 


Personal Property 


151 


Total 


Real and Personal 


4045 


Tax Levy 




Overlay 




Tax Rate per thousand all 


classes 


1993 






1) 


Residential 


3544 


2) 


Open Space 


175 


3) 


Commercial 


145 


4) 


Industrial 


39 


5) 


Personal Property 


141 


Total 


Real and Personal 


4044 



701,347,777.00 

4,604,350.00 

33,287,750.00 

23,212,000.00 

7,913,000.00 

770,364,877.00 

10,908,366.66 

125,028.66 

14.16 



711,068,427.00 

3,923,350.00 

33,233,050.00 

23,212,000.00 

7,772,400.00 

779,209,227.00 



Tax Levy 11,368,706.40 

Overlay 100,108.40 

Tax Rate per thousand all classes 14.59 



210 







COLLECTOR OF TAXES 








Taxes Receivable 






Real Estate 


5 Personal Property 


Excise Tax 


1992 


$213,230.18 


$ 3,457.08 


$107,912.05 


1991 


83,684.25 


514.56 


67,023.94 


Prior Years 


29,996.51 


1,166.29 


32,144.35 


TOTAL 


$326,910.94 


$5,137.93 


$207,080.34 


Taxes in Litigation 




$ 23,005.00 




Water Rates 




110,666.01 




Sewer Rates 




100,825.95 




Septic 




508.11 




ADDED TO TAXES: 






Water & Sewer Liens 


$9,925.58 




Apportioned Betterments 


103.09 




Committed Interesl 




37.67 





Respectfully submitted, 



Robert G. Stokes 
Tax Collector 



211 



TOWN TREASURER 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Residents of Medfield: 

STATEMENT OF CASH 

Receipts Fiscal 1992- 

including investment returns $ 17,186,185.31 

Disbursements Fiscal 1992 - 

including reinvestments 16,838,530.84 

Cash in Banks June 30, 1992 $2,621,320.05 



STATEMENT OF INVESTMENTS 
Pooled Investment Fund 
Investments June 30, 1992 965,724.23 

Total Cash, Savings and Investments - 
June 30, 1992 $3,587,044.28 



STATEMENT OF INTEREST RECEIVED ON SAVINGS/INVESTMENTS 

General Fund $ 1 1 0,700. 86 

Pooled Investment Fund 77,382.47 

Total Interest Received Fiscal 1992 $ 188,083.33 



OUTSTANDING DEBT ACCOUNTS 
June 30, 1992 

Outside Debt Limit: 

Aquifer Land Acquisition $ 700,000.00 

Town Land Acquisition 380,000.00 

Street Sewers and Construction 200,000.00 

$1,280,000.00 
Inside Debt Limit: 

Refuse Transfer Station $ 300,000.00 

Sewers - Pine Needle Park 2,220,000.00 

$2,520,000.00 

Net Funded or Fixed Debt Balance $3,800,000.00 



212 



TOWN TREASURER 

TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 

Funds in Custody of Town Treasurer: 

Retirement/Pension $1,223,590.93 

Conservation 32,419.57 

Stabilization 140,871.57 

Group Health Insurance 62,080.87 

Special Unemployment Insurance 142,341 .49 

Library Trusts 11,657.46 

Granville Dailey - Library 75,483. 19 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 14,993 .08 

Municipal Insurance 172,615.55 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 98,086.83 

Council on Aging 3,089.74 

Palumbo Sports Fund 3,407.74 

Library Income Expendable 6,3 1 1 .85 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 367, 122.24 

Cemetery Income Account 4,476.89 

Moses Ellis Post #1 17 G.A.R. 9,3 19.49 

Medfield Antiquities Trust 3,784.29 

Tri-Centennial Trust 1,511.20 

Madelyn L. Grant Library Fund 39,653. 17 

School Essay Fund 2,728.99 

Granville Income Fund 400.84 

Balance June 30, 1992 $2,415,946.98 



The foregoing is a record of cash, investments, interest earned, trust funds and outstanding debts 
for fiscal year ended June 30, 1992. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert G. Stokes 
Town Treasurer/Collector 



213 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



TOWN OF MEDFIELD 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1992 



GENERAL FUND 



DEBIT 



CREDIT 



Cash $3,354,277 

Investment of Available Funds 

Total Cash & Available Funds 



$3,354,277 



Personal Property 
Current Year 
Prior Years 



$3,276 
3.930 



7,206 



Real Estate 
Current Year 
Prior Years 
Prepaid Taxes 



Other Taxes 
Forestry 
Recreation 



TOTAL TAXES 



Provision for Abatements & Exemptions 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Taxes 



Tax Liens Receivable 

Reserve for Uncollected Tax Liens 



$269,808 

106,846 






376,654 


$ (203) 
1.369 








$ 


1.166 
385,026 


iptions 




$ 96,364 

12,657 

385.026 
$494,047 


dens 


$ 


108,010 

108,010 



Taxes in Litigation Receivable 
Reserve for Taxes in Litigation 



23,005 



23,005 



Deferred Taxes Receivable 
Reserve for Deferred Taxes 



14,470 



14,470 



Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Current Year 
Prior Years 

Reserve for Uncollected Excise Tax 



100,991 

96.783 

$ 197,774 



$197,774 



214 



Departmental Receivables: 

Ambulance $ 63,287 

Reserve for Uncollected Departmental Rec $ 63,287 



Unapportioned Betterments Added to Tax: 

Water 

Sewer 
Committed Interest 

Reserve for Betterments Added to Tax 



$ 847 

551,875 

1.381 

$554,103 



554,103 



Agency Payables: 

Teachers' Retirement Withholding 
Life Insurance Withholdings 
Add'l Voluntary Life Ins. Withholding 
Health Insurance Withholdings 
Annuity Withholding Payable 
Medicare Withholding Payable 

Warrants Payable 



4,037 
2,041 
1,937 
(5,049) 
6,492 

85 

9,543 
536,019 



Guarantee Deposits 
Treasurer's Tax Title 



7,500 
18,854 



Reserved Fund Balances: 

Reserve for Over (Under) Assessments 
Reserve for Encumbrances: 

Pine Needle Park Sewer Construction 

Special Warrant Articles 

Budget Escrow Accounts 
Reserve for Planned Budget Deficit (FY93) 



(732) 

632,211 
994,939 
198,859 
357,765 



TOTAL RESERVED FUND BALANCES 



Unreserved Fund Balance 



$2, 



183,042 
490,298 



GENERAL FUND TOTALS 



$4,699,952 $4,699,952 



SPECIAL REVENUE FUND 
Due from General Fund 



$ 690,075 



215 



Federal: 
Ambulance 



508 



Total Federal 



508 



State: 

Public Works - Highway up Front 

Chapter 90 - Highway 

Arts Lottery 

Elderly Grants 

Right-to-Know 

Suicide Prevention 

Library Grants 

DARE 

Hurricane Bob 

Allendale Affordable Housing 

Drug Education Grant - Police 
School: 

Drug Free Schools 

Chapter I ECIA 

Title VIB (94-142) 

Title VIB Early Childhood 

Chapter II ECIA 

School Improvement 

D. Eisenhower Grant 

Horace Mann Grant 



304,147 

5,400 

7,069 

758 

1,094 

240 

4,406 

1,658 

67,977 

34,300 

1,407 

(612) 

109 

13,130 

1,652 

310 

2,454 

1,750 

1 



Total State 



Revolving: 

School Tuition 

School Lunch 

School Council Improvement 

Memorial School Rents 

School Custodian Detail 

Adult Education 

School Athletics 

Park & Recreation 

Police Detail 

College Night 

Fire Revolving 

Ambulance Mileage Fees 

Total Revolving 

Reserved for Appropriation: 
Perpetual Care 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Total Reserved for Appropriations 



$ 


447,250 


$ 


61,625 




19,020 




606 




(6,549) 




4,049 




(8,598) 




10,910 




24,018 




16,729 




2,396 




369 




1,083 


$ 


125,658 




3,265 




51,980 



55,245 



216 



$ 32, 


,770 


6, 


,201 


2 


,267 




530 


8, 


,126 




900 




100 


10, 


,520 


$ 61. 


,414 



Other Special Revenue: 
Gift Accounts 
Fine Arts 

Oxbow Water System Study- 
Theatre Fund 
Conservation Fee Account 
Special Investigation Fund 
Cable Access 
Premium/ Interest Accrued on Loans 

Total Other Special Revenue 

SPECIAL REVENUE TOTALS $ 690,075 $690,075 

TRUST FUNDS 

Cash $2,313,218 

Prepaid Expense 100,000 

In Custody of the Treasurer: 

Pension $1,223,591 

Conservation 32,420 

Stabilization 140,872 

Gloria Lynn Library Scholarship 14,993 

Library Trusts 11,657 

Granville Daily Library 75,483 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 367,122 

Special Unemployment Insurance 142,342 

Madelyn L. Grant Scholarship 98,087 

Council On Aging 3,090 

Palumbo Sports 3,408 

Municipal Insurance 172,616 

Group Health Insurance 62,081 

Library Income Expendable 6,713 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Expendable 4,476 



Total in Custody of the Treasurer $2,358,951 

In Custody of the Board of Selectmen: 

Moses Ellis Post G.A.R. $ 9,319 

Antiquities 3,784 

Tricentennial 1,511 



Total in Custody of the Board 

of Selectmen $ 14,614 

In Custody of the Library Trustees: 

Madelyn L. Grant $ 39,653 



TRUST FUND TOTALS $2,413,218 $2,413,218 



TOTAL FUND BALANCES $7,803,245 $7,803,245 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Georgia K. Colivas, Town Accountant 
217 



WATER AND SEWER ENTERPRISE FUND 

ESTABLISHED JULY 1, 1991 (FISCAL YEAR 1992) UNDER 

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS, CHAPTER 40, SECTION 3 9K 



WATER 

TOTAL SERVICES 3,246 

ADDED SERVICES 64 

THOUSAND GALLONS PUMPED 3 66,000 

THOUSAND GALLONS SOLD 329,000 

WATER ENTERPRISE EXPENDITURES $443,858 

RETAINED EARNINGS - RESERVED 104,297 

RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 92,136 



SEWER 



TOTAL SERVICES 
ADDED SERVICES 

WATER ENTERPRISE EXPENDITURES 
DEBT SERVICE 

RETAINED EARNINGS - UNRESERVED 



$196,433 



1, 


,127 




32 


$429, 


,961 


129, 


,456 


(28, 


,396) 



218 



CONTRACTS FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



Department/ 
Board 

Assessors 

Stanley Bergeron 
96 Hecla St. 
Uxbridge, MA 

Vinson Rasta 
31 Thornton Rd. 
Chestnut Hill, MA 

Municipal Computer 
Service 



Carlson Survey Co 

Health 

William R. Doomey 
1 Brush Hill Rd. 
Sherborn, MA 

Walpole Visiting 
Nurse Association 
Walpole, MA 



Purpose 



Real estate appraisal 
consultant. 



Amount 
$43/hour 



Personal property appraisal $30/parcel 

Consultant. Updating public 

utilities. $1, 000/utility 

Printing tax bills, commitment $15,430 
books, master report lists and 
computerized equalization program. 

Correcting and updating $5. /parcel 
assessor's maps. $2. /Lot 

Consultant Sanitary Engineer/ $15,600 
Agent for the Board of Health. 



Responsible for all Public 
Health nursing needs and 
communicable disease follow-ups 
and statistics. 



$ 8,230 



Planning 
Whitman & 



Howard Assistance in reviewing $ 40 /hour 
subdivision plans, site plans and 
other engineering services. 



School 

Joseph A. Emerson 
44 Bromfield St. 
Boston, MA 



Legal consultant for School 

Committee. 



$95/hour 



Selectmen 

Tucci & Roselli 
C.P.A. 



Fiscal Audit 



$6,950 



Town Clerk 

L.H.S. Associates 
Dundee Park 
Andover, MA 



Street Listing and Voter $.40/name 
Census by Mail 



219 



PERPETUAL CARE 



Richard E. Gilman $ 700 

Richard L. and H. Joyce Goodwin 3 50 

Gertrude L. Ehnes 350 

Catherine P. Bickel 700 

Joseph A. and Mary Gillis 300 

Donna Zuzevich Gavaghan 700 

Beverly L. Hallowell 700 

Frances Gould 12 

George J.R. Sauer 2,800 

Dorothy Kopf 350 

Michael Flynn 350 

James M. and Sharon Keane 350 

Francis A. and Elizabeth M. Logue 1,400 

William Stewart 350 
Richard L. McCurry, Grace D. and Gail A. Dahlberg 1,400 

Andrew R. and Elizabeth Logie 2,800 

Arthur Milton 350 

$14,070 



220 



INDEX 



Page 

Town Officers Elected 7 

APPOINTMENTS BY: 

Board of Selectmen. . 9 

Assessors 20 

Town Accountant 2 

Town Clerk 2 

Fire Chief 21 

Board of Health 21 

Moderator 21 

Planning Board 22 

Treasurer/Collector 22 

DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

Affordable Housing Committee 42 

Aging , Council on 46 

Ambulance Department 41 

Animal Inspector 47 

Appeals on Zoning, Board of 48 

Arts, Council on 49 

Assessors, Board of 51 

Cemetery Commissioners 53 

Civil Defense Department 54 

Conservation Commission 55 

Fire Department 34 

Health, Board of 59 

Historical Commission 65 

Housing Authority 67 

Inspection Department 68 

Kingsbury Pond Committee 71 

Library Trustees 77 

Medfield Youth Advisory Commission 103 

Memorials, Committee to Study 82 

Memorial Public Library. ... 75 

Memorial Day Address 79 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 73 

Mosquito Control, Norfolk County 84 

Park and Recreation Commission 85 

Planning Board 88 

Police Department 33 

Public Works, Superintendent 30 

Recycling Committee 9 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 102 

Selectmen, Board of 2 6 

Tree and Insect Pest Control 93 

Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical School 94 

Veterans' Services 102 

Water and Sewerage Board 100 



221 



Page 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS: 

School Committee 108 

Superintendent of Schools . ill 

Assistant superintendent 113 

Teachers' Directory 115 

Amos Clark Kingsbury High School 126 

Graduation Exercises, High School 128 

Thomas A. Blake Middle School 132 

Dale Street School 134 

Ralph Wheelock School 137 

Memorial School 140 

Report of the Pupil Services Department 142 

Athletic Director 145 

Adult Education Program 144 

Food Service Director 150 

Director of Plant Management 152 



TOWN CLERK'S RECORDS: 

Births 156 

Deaths 163 

Marriages 159 



TOWN MEETINGS AND ELECTIONS: 

Presidential Primary, March 10, 1992 165 

Annual Town Election, March 30, 1992 168 

Warrant and Proceedings, Annual Town Meeting 

April 27, 1992 171 

Special Recall Election, June 9, 1992 198 

State Primary, September 15, 1992 201 

Presidential Election, November 3, 1992 204 



FINANCIAL REPORTS: 

Assessors' Report 210 

Collector 211 

Contracts for Professional Services 219 

Perpetual Care 220 

Town Accountant 214 

Treasurer 212 

Water and Sewer Department 218 



222